53RD SERVICE GROUP, UNIT HISTORIES

A military airfield does not just accommodate combat aircrew and aircraft. There are various supporting organizations that fulfilled the numerous ancillary roles necessary for the operation of the airfield, and also to supply, maintain, and support its aircraft and personnel.

This gives a total of 413 Officers and 1568 Enlisted Men, a total of 1,981 personnel.

A Service Group was also assigned to each airfield to provide ancillary services to the combat group and squadrons assigned there. A number of separate units were attached to the serice group, each providing a particular primary service. Apart from the Service Squadrons and the Ordnance Supply and Maintenance Companies; most of the units of the 53rd Service Group seem to have been split into teams or detachments with each assigned to a separate airfield. These were assigned to the 391st Bomb Group at Station 166, Matching Green and the 387th Bomb Group at Station 162, Chipping Ongar (Willingale), Essex as follows (the number of Officers and Enlisted Men are annotated):

Alert Orders No. 66, for the movement of service group personnel overseas to France and which appears on page 1747 below, gives us approximately 860 service group personnel based at Station 166. By adding this number to the personnel listed in Movement Orders #12 above, this gives a grand total of approximately 2,800 personnel based at Station 166. This figure appears to be typical for an Army Air Force bomber station.

The "Unit Histories" for the 53rd Service Group and its attached units have been transcribed from digital copies of the US Air Force microfiche records. These are included below for information and as a tribute to the personnel of these organizations who served their country and contributed to the victory of the Allied Forces in World War II.


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APO 149, US Army
6 May 1945

Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron
53rd Service Group
Less Dets A & B

Subject: Historical Data

To: Commanding Officer, 30 Air Depot Group, APO 149, US Army Attn: Historical Officer

In compliance with letter, your Headquarters, subject "Historical Data", dated 4 May 1945, file number 314.7 the following report is submitted:

The Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, 53rd Air Base Group (SP) was activated at Craig Field, Selma, Alabama. The cadre was made up of enlisted personnel drawn from the unit station there. The Squadron Commander was Captain Matthew G. Stanhope, AC. Authority for the activation of this organization was contained in letter, War Department, AG 320.2, AAF, dated 6 August 1941 .

On 1 November 1941 this cadre of Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, 53rd Air Base Group (SP) moved by motor convoy to their new Field, at that time known as Grimes Field, Dothan, Alabama, and later named Napier Field.

The Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, 53rd Air Base Group (SP) was redesignated the Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, 53rd Service Group, pursuant to letter from the War Department, AG 320.2, dated 13 June 1942 .

In September 1942, Captain Stephen B. Kinard, AC, relieved Captain Matthew G. Stanhope, AC, as Squadron Commander, per paragraph 1, Special Orders No. 18, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, dated 15 September 1942.

The Headquarters Squadron, after spending 11 (11) prosperous months at Napier Field, Dothan, Alabama, received its moving orders, in compliance with paragraph 3, Special Orders No. 156, Headquarters, 3rd Air Service Area Command, dated 2 October 1942; the Headquarters Squadron moved by troop train, under the Command of Captain Stephen B. Kinard, to their new station, Columbia Army Air Base, Columbia, South Carolina, arriving there on 2 October 1942. While the Squadron was stationed at Columbia Army Air Base, additional changes were made in the Officer personnel. Captain Arthur O. Pittenger, AC, relieved Captain Stephen B. Kinard, as Squadron Commander, per Special Orders No. 27, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, dated 27 October 1942.

The next move for the Headquarters Squadron was to Dale Mabry Field, Tallahassee, Florida, on 11 November 1942, under the Command of Captain Arthur O. Pittenger. This move was also made by troop train.

While stationed at Dale Mabry Field, Captain David H. Moffat, AC, relieved Captain Pittenger, as Squadron Commander, as per paragraph 1, Special Orders No. 39, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, dated 16 December 1942. After a very short period of Command, Captain Moffat was relieved from his duties as Squadron Commander to attend to other duties, and Captain Pittenger was placed back in Command, per paragraph 1, Special Orders No. 43, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, dated 28 December 1942.

2nd Lt Earl G. Shahan, AC relieved Captain Pittenger, as Squadron Commander as per Special Orders No. 1, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, dated 6 January 1943.

The next move for the Headquarters Squadron was to the Greenville Service Group Training Center, Greenville, South Carolina, pursuant to letter, AAF, Headquarters, Air Service Command, 9 February 1943. This move was made under the Command of 2nd Lt Shahan, and was made by motor convoy, with a one night stay in Macon, Georgia, and arriving at the new station on March 19, 1943.

Later 2nd Lt Richmond R. Fowler, AC, was assigned to the squadron and relieved 2nd Lt Shahan, of his duties as Squadron Commander, per paragraph 4, Special Orders No. 30, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, dated 22 March 1943. Lt Shahan was appointed Group S-3 officer, on the same order.

The next move for the Headquarters Squadron was to Walterboro Army Air Field, Walterboro, South Carolina, by motor convoy, pursuant to Special Orders No. 94, paragraph 12, Headquarters, Greenville Service Group Training Center, Greenville, South Carolina, dated 11 may 1943, and Field Orders No. 5, 53rd Service Group, dated 13 May 1943 .

The next and the last move for the Headquarters Squadron before going overseas was to Camp Shanks, New York, pursuant to Special Orders No. 121, paragraph 9, Headquarters, Warner Robins Air Service Command, dated 26 June 1943, and Special Orders No. 182, paragraph 1, Columbia Army Air Base, Columbia, South Carolina and Special Orders No. 103, paragraph 2, 53rd Service Group, Walterboro Army Air Field, Walterboro, South Carolina, dated 30 June 1943. This move was made by troop train, under Command of Lieutenant Fowler.

On the morning Of 16 July 1943 the Headquarters Squadron left Camp Shanks and boarded the troop ship "Hawaiian Shipper". The next morning the "Hawaiian Shipper" pulled away from its dock and headed into the wide open Atlantic Ocean.

On the evening Of 26 July 1943 the "Hawaiian Shipper" steamed into the port of Gourock, Scotland, and dropped anchor. The following afternoon, the Headquarters Squadron debarked and entrained, bound for its new destination, which was AAF Station 162, Willingale, Essex County, England.

On 4 January 1944, the Headquarters Squadron moved to AAF station 166, Matching, Essex County, England.

Captain Fowler was relieved of his duties as Squadron Commander by 1st Lt Walter N. Armbruster, AC, per paragraph 4, Special Orders No. 11, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, dated 4 January 1944 .

On 27 August 1944, Captain James L. Tucker, relieved Captain Armbruster, as Squadron Commander.

On 7 September 1944 Captain John A. Everhard, relieved Captain Tucker, as Squadron Commander.

On 27 September, the Headquarters Squadron moved to Roye/Amy, France, strip A-73.

On 12 October, that Headquarters Squadron moved to Notre Dame Du Thily, strip A-61A VM 9109.

On 20 February 1945, under the reorganization of Service Groups the Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron was divided into 3 detachments. Two of them designated detachment "A" and detachment "B" Hq and Hq Sq, 53rd Service Group, and the third (this organization) was designated Hq and Hq Sq, 53rd Service Group, less detachments A & B.

Captain Everhard was transferred 20 February 1945 to Det "A" and 1st Lt Robert M. Lick, AC, Squadron Adjutant at that time assumed the duty of Acting Squadron Commander, of this detachment.

On 25 February 1945, Hq Sq, Less Dets A & B, moved to Beauvais/Tille Strip A-61A N 925097.

On 9 April 1945, Hq Sq, Less Dets A & B, moved to Tirlemon, Belgium Strip A-89 J 906433, per Secret letter, Hq, IX Air Force Service Command, subject: Movement of Troops Orders (No. 65) dated 3 April 1945. The organization is still serving at this address.

Robert M. Lick
1st Lt., A. C.,
Historical Officer


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1576 ###]

Auth: CO, AAF Sta166
Date: 31 Mar 1944
Initials: ???

ANNEX II
COMPANY HISTORY
of the
1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn)
March 1 to 31 1944

Organization: Negative.

Strength: as of March 31, 1944, the total strength of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn) was 4 Officers and 76 Enlisted Men.

Casualties: Negative.

Decorations: Negative.

Operation of unit: All sections of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn) are operational and are performing their primary functions.

Master Sergeant Angelo A. Emerson, the Automotive Shop Foreman was commended by Ninth Air Force for "the efficient manner in which he is performing his duties and the superior knowledge of motor vehicles and motor vehicle maintenance".

Completion of the Maintenance Shop in the latter part of this month assures continuance of a high level of efficiency in the Maintenance Section.

Lt. Irving Brody joined the organization on March 10, 1944, and was appointed Armament Supply & Property Officer vice Lt. Fred J. Werran. Lt. Werran was appointed Ammunition Supply Officer.

A Company Party was held on March 22, 1944, at Matching Tye. A fine time was had by all. Major Sam J. Pecoraro, the Group Ordnance Officer, was Guest of Honor


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1578 ###]

Auth: CO, AAF Sta162
Initials: ???

1812th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co. Avn
Office of the Company Commander
Service Team "B", 53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 5 April 1944

Subject: Unit History.

To: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. Thru: Commanding Officer, Service Team "B", 53rd Service Group.

1. In compliance with Paragraph 3, letter Hq 53rd Service Group, dated 23 January 1944, Subject "Unit Histories", the following report is submitted:

A. Organization: Negative.

B. Strength: 31 March 1944: 75 EM, 4 Officers

C. Date of arrival or departure of Station: Negative.

E. Awards to & Decorations of members: Negative.

2. The most important event during this month was the filling of the majority of our personnel shortages. This company has been operating all of its sections very efficiently with the eighty-two (82%) per cent of its authorized personnel, both in officers and enlisted men.

3. Two of our men, namely, Cpl Martin Laurel and Cpl Clarence J. Stanley, were requested by 1st AADA to proceed to the 1461 Ordnance AA Co for the purpose of teaching and giving instruction in all matters pertinent to ammunition and armament. Since our unit is just a little over one year old, we feel quite proud to have and to be able to send these men on detached service for thirty (30) days.

4. During the month of March we were fortunate to be able to send several officers and enlisted men to special schools:

a. Lt Sidney L. Silesky attended a one day school on enemy ammunition, small arms and booby traps.

b. Lt Curtis O. Sandals and Sgt Edward Schukman attended a twelve day, two hours per day, course in Chemical Warfare. Our entire company has now attained a high degree of efficiency in the protection against chemical attacks.

c. Sgt Rhodes was on detached service for seven (7) days to participate in a course of instruction on mines, booby traps and camouflage.

5. Throughout the month the unit as a whole has performed not only its primary mission very satisfactorily but also has maintained high standards of morale.

Curtis O. Sandals
1st Lt., Ord. Dept.
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1580 ###]

1052nd Signal Company (SG)
53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 31 March 1944

Subject: Unit History

To: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. (ATTN: Group Historian)

1. Following is the March installment of the Unit History of this organization. Important changes were as follows:

a. Organization: T/5 Giovanni T. Costantini, 36357206, 060, listed as overage, was transferred out and replaced by Cpl Cecil C. Sumners, 18029762, 405, who joined the organization on 20 March.

b. Strength: No change.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. Company activities for the month of March were dominated by the extensive preparations necessary for overseas movement and the achievement of the mobility emphasized by our Commanding general, The extensive problem of finding time to accomplish this work and at the Same time fulfill our mission of supply and repair for the Tactical Bomb Groups was a constant problem to be coped with. The preponderate requirements in time and planning, the necessary meetings with noncoms and with the company at large to coordinate these extensive preparations absorbed most of the time of the Headquarters Section, the reports required by higher headquarters on our condition of readiness, etc., now amount to almost one a day and exceed in time required for their accomplishment the normal administrative duties. Among special training directed by the headquarters section were the following: the courier drivers were given a chance to fire their pistols on the range and were given instructions in the weapon by Captain Rieck; at the same time the drivers fired the 50 cal. machine gun from the mount on the truck; and 1st Lt John M Casson, O-1643738, and S/Sgt John J. Costello, Jr., 12034091, were sent to special school conducted by the Group Chemical Warfare service.

3. In the Operations section an outstanding plan to increase mobility was worked out by S/Sgt John Fisher, 37471453, chief of the Wire Section at Station 162, By using a system of plugs all along the circuit from the switchboard through homemade junction boxes for testing and by using cable instead of field wire the whole system may be taken down in a very few minutes. Excess cable on the main lines was left on the drum so that it did not have to be cut. The Radio Operations Section had a field problem consisting of setting up a radio station under field conditions. The exercise was very successful and constituted the first test of mobility for the Company. 2nd Lt William W. Pashwa, O-1645273, the Operations Officer, attended a school in British codes and ciphers.

4. The Warehouse and mobile Radio Repair Sections of Station 166 had the distinction of receiving compliments for excellent work. S/Sgt John J, Costello, Jr., 12034091, received a commendation from the 391st Bomb Group (M) for the very excellent job of supply performed by his section. On the thirteenth of March Major Roberts of 1st AADA inspected the Company and was particularly impressed by the work done by T/4 Donnis E. Taylor, 34395374, and Sgt Joseph C. Bleiler, 31090438, on the mobile Repair Truck. The Major requested drawings and photographs. photographs were taken by the service group photo laboratory and copies are included with this report. This work is another example of what technical ingenuity can do with junk and scrap to improve existing equipment. During a raid on the night of the fourteenth the Supply and Repair building was almost hit by a large shell.

5. In spite of a full program time was allotted for recreation. Acting on a directive from higher headquarters S/Sgt Robert Gray, 35262884, organized a physical training program, emphasizing sports. A Company soft ball team was organized and played several games, and the sections were divided into teams to play each other, reviving an old rivalry in the organization which dates back to Columbia, South Carolina, where the privates used to play the noncoms with a bet of a dollar a head. Continuing its policy of being the unofficial morale section of the Group, the company carried out the following projects. The Radio Repair Section at station 162 has two radios in operation, and with scrap wire and speakers purchased locally or made from scraps an extension was placed in nearly every hut in the surrounding area, at Station 166 T/5 Herbert F. Worm, 36243563, and T/5 Tolbert J. Neibich, 33506232, continued to operate the base motion picture projectors at night and showing training films during the day for the Bomb Group. Giving upmost of their spare time, they helped build the stage equipment and helped Special service put on several USO Shows, and among; distinguished visitors at tie theater was James Cagney.

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1582 ###]

Auth: CG 9th AF
Init:

5 April 1944

314.7

HEADQUARTERS
2198TH QUARTERMASTER TRUCK COMPANY AVN
53rd SERVICE GROUP
APO 149, US ARMY

5 April 1944

UNIT HISTORY, for Month March 1944:

1. ORGANIZATION: Negative.

2. STRENGTH: a. 1 Officer Transferred, b. 2 Officers assigned and joined, c. 2 Enlisted Men transferred, d. 1 Enlisted Man assigned and joined.

TOTAL STRENGTH 3 Officers 96 Enlisted Men

3. MOVEMENT: On 7th March 1944, from AAF Station 169 to Station 166. Detachment "A" 2198th Truck Co., Avn, consisting of one Officer, and 41 Enlisted Men moved to AAF Station 162, and assigned to Team "B", 53rd Service Group.

4. CASUALTIES: Negative.

5. DECORATIONS: Negative.

6. Month of March company was separated into two teams, operating at two stations. Aside from this it was just another month in the Army, consisting of the usual Company and Garrison duties of a Quartermaster Truck Company. The organization lost one Officer, 2nd Lieut., LAWRENCE M, BLICKLEY, and two enlisted men who were overages in the organization. The company gained two Officers, 2nd Lieut RAYMOND J. STONEHOUSE, Automotive Officer, and 2nd Lieut IRA J. NYE, Supply Officer.

For the Commanding Officer:

IRA J. NYE
2nd Lieut., AC
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1583 ###]

873RD CHEMICAL COMPANY, AIR OPERATIONS (H or M) AAF STATION 166

6 April 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History

To: Headquarters "Team A", 53rd Service Group, AAF Sta 166.

1. This organization made no changes during the month of March 1944, that could be recorded as Unit History.

2. This organization performed usual ??? from the period of 1 March 1944 to 31 March 1944 inclusive.

ROBERT H. GRAY
1st. Lt., CWS,
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1584 ###]

Auth: CO, 166
Date: 5 Apr 44
Init:

1176TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY, SERVICE GP (AVN)
APO 149, US Army.

5 April 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History

To: Group Historian, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. The following is a subsequent installment of the Unit History of this organization for the month of March 1944.

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: (As of 31 March 44) 2 Officers 38 EM

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

DANIEL W. MAHONEY
1st Lieut., QMC
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1587 ###]

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP
APO 149 US ARMY

4 May 1944

SUBJECT: Monthly Installment of Unit History

To: Group Historical Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with memorandum, Hqs, IX Air Force Service Command, No. 20-10, dated 5 February 1944, the following, information is submitted:

a. Organization: Organization reorganized under T/O 1-412, dated 16 June 1943, including changes one (1) and two (2).

b. Strength: 27 Officers and 130 Enlisted Men.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. This unit is at the present time stationed at AAF Station #166, with Team "A" of the 53rd Service Group. The Finance Section and five (5) enlisted men of this unit is at AAF Station #162 with Team "B" of the 53rd Service Group.

WALTER N. ARMBRUSTER,
1st Lt., Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1588 ###]

AUTH: CO Sta 162
Date: 5 May 1944
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE SQUADRON
Office of the Commanding Officer

APO 149, US Army 5 May 1944

In reply refer to: 300.6

SUBJECT: Unit History

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with letter, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army, dated 23 January 1944, subject, Unit Histories, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: None.

b. Strength: O-7, WO-2, EM-216.

c. Movement: None.

d. Casualties: None.

e. Decorations: None.

2. Organization performing 3rd Echelon Maintenance on B26s for the 387th Bombardment Group (M).

IRWIN L. UNGERLEIDER
Capt., Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1589 ###]

Auth: OG Ninth AF
Initials:
Date: 5 May 1944

40TH MOBILE R & R SQUADRON
AAF Station 166

APO 149 US Army 5 May 1944

314.7

Unit History, April 1944

1. Organization: Negative.

2. Strength: a. Officer 7, b. Enlisted Men 164

3. Movement: Negative.

4. Casualties: Negative.

5. Decorations: Negative.

The need for sheet metal workers in the Organization became acute. Twenty men were sent to a three week course in sheet metal work to help off set this situation. To complete their training the men are now assigned in "on-the-job training" which means daily application of their newly acquired knowledge. And additional 25 men were assigned from the 13th RCD. Before these men will have actually joined the organization, they will attend sheet metal courses.

1st Lt John R. Weaver, Squadron transportation officer, was promoted to the grade of Captain per Par 10, GO 92, Hq ETOUSA. Captain Weaver was transferred to Detachment "A" and Lt Hugh Skidmore came to station 166.

Captain Gogle, CO of the outfit was granted a well earned ?? day leave, which he spent with friends and relatives in Scotland and 1st Lt James R. Hysler, Jr assumed command, per Sq Order 5, of the Squadron.

Under the consolidation of the Medics in the Ninth Air Force the Squadron lost its medical personnel.

Five missions were assigned the Squadron during the month of April. Two B-26s were forced down on an emergency landing strip at an RAF base in Suffolk County. One ship was to be repaired the other salvage. Two units were dispatched and the job was completed in six days.

The next two assignments were at Manston, Kent, near the the faces Cliffs of Dover. The men of these two units experienced are higher degree of assisilated? war fare. A B-24 returning from enemy territory was forced down. As the ship approached to runway, its guns began blazing away. Needless to say the men of the 40th played soldier fast and well as they hit and hugged the ground.

The following day, a bomb from a P-47 went wild and hit the field, and for the good of all concerned it turned out to be a dud.

With these two near misses and the coast of France within sight, the crews worked hard and well to get the two ships back in flying condition.

The final mission of the month was at Great Sailings, where where a Unit of six men chalked up another ship to re-visit with Adolph.

Fie EM were transferred per VOCO 1st AADA to the 16th Depot Repair Squadron. One EM was transferred to General Hospital as a result of an accidental self-inflicted gun wound.

Equipment for the the mobile units is fast pouring in and at the present rate it won't be too long before each unit will be fully equipped.

As the continuous onslaught of air power continues over the enemy, the Squadron looks forward to a busy month ahead. Like the other units in the group it is all boxed up and ready to move at the given time.

JAMES H. HYSLER
1st Lt., AC Sq History


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1592 ###]

Auth: CO9AF
Date: 4 Jan 44
Init:

87th Service Squadron

APO 149, US Army 5 May 1944.

SUBJECT: Squadron History (Installment IV, 30 April 1944)

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with Letter, Hq, 53rd Service Group, Subject: Unit History, 23rd January 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. 7 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers, 222 Enlisted Men

c. Arrived AAF Station 173, Dunkeswell, near Honiton, Devon, 28 July 1943. Departed AAF Station 173 and arrived at AAF Station 162, Chipping Ongar, Essex, 13 November 1943. Departed AAF Station 162, 27 December 1943 and arrived at AAF Station 166, Matching Green, Essex, 27 December 1943.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations and Awards: Negative.

2. April 1944 was a notable month in the history of United States Army Air Forces in the European Theater of Operations. Reports showed over 100,900 tons of bombs dropped over Germany and German occupied territory during this month. No small share of this tremendous feat belongs to the Ninth Air Force. Clear, bright days plus the extra hour of daylight each day found fleets of Ninth Air Force bombers and fighters scuttling through the clouds twice a day to attack their objectives along the invasion coast. Interception by enemy planes was practically nil. However, German ack-ack was always severe and resulted in numerous cases of battle damage to the B-26 Marauders based at AAF Station 166. The 87th Service Squadron was again called upon to give their utmost as the ships had to be patched up and sent up in the air within excessively few hours. It was not an uncommon sight, during those weeks to find one B-26 leaving on a mission with a part belonging to another ship that was not quite ready to leave on operations. One aluminum painted ship had a rudder of a battle painted ship put on so that it could perform its mission. Returning from the mission it was found that the replacement rudder was severely flakked on the days operations. The handicaps the men had to work under were many yet at the end of the month, it was found that no ship under the care of the 87th Service Squadron was non-operational during the month.

3. The Mobile Units, of which this organization has four, has played a major role in repairing and servicing the Marauder B-26 of the 391st Bomb Group. Under the very capable Warrant Officer WILLIAM BAK, who holds a citation from Brigadier General A. ANDERSON, the mobile units have completed work on one hundred twenty-six Marauder aircraft during the month of April 1944. Eighty-five of these repair jobs were cases of battle damage while forty one were cases of memorandum modifications. This was no small job considering the fact that battle damage to one ship took in all the flak holes sometimes numbering as many as fifty on one ship. Speed was the word along with care as the boys worked day in to night and night in to day to got the ships ready for the air.

4. Despite the tremendous obligation placed upon the personnel of the squadron by the effects of battle it was still necessary to carry on the routine work of the organization, which includes the marking and packaging for overseas movement at this time. "Mobility" was stressed even more. The month of April found the 87th Service Squadron completely mobile with the completion of the marking and lettering of the boxes.

5. Two Officers joined the organization in month of April. 1st Lt THOMAS B. HAWKINS joined as the 87th Service Squadron Adjutant and 1st Lt SAMUEL R. REMAR joined as transportation Officer.

WESLEY B. GOVER
Captain, Air Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1594 ###]

87th Service Squadron

APO 149, US Army 5 May 1944.

SUBJECT: Biographical Sketch TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

Joe Ludes is tall, thin faced, ruddy complexioned. To one who doesn't know him, Joe is apt to appear taciturn and quiet. To his friends and tent mates however, Joe is a fun loving prankster, a sportsman, a regular guy. To get him talking, all one need do is mention some incident relative to some sporting event. He can tell you about it, especially if it concerns golf. Joe's first and lest love is golf which is perhaps, the reason he left Penn State College; to devote all his time to the golfing profession. While attending Penn State, Ludes was Captain of the Golf Teams of 1926 and 1927. In the years to come Joe was slated for bigger and better things. As assistant to Ed Dudley, President of PGA, he helped establish his reputation at the world famous "Augusta National Golf-Club", Augusta, Georgia. Upon induction into the armed forces, Joe was the Pro Golfer at the exclusive and well known Philadelphia Country Club.

Carrying his golfing interest with him into the Army, Joe Ludes participated in golfing matches and exhibitions at Napier Field, Dothan, Alabama. His services were in demand. COLONEL DANIELS, commanding Napier field, desired his participation in Intra-Mural Sports. At that time he was offered a post with the permanent staff at Napier Field where his talent as a golfer could be brought into play. However, he refused, preferring to accompany the 87th Service Squadron on their moves.

T/Sgt Joseph Ludes has participated and competed in thirteen golf matches as a member of the Hans Crescent American Red Cross Golf Team of London. One of the aims of this club is the promotion of Anglo-American Relationship. This team has has competed with different country club teams, soldier teams - British, Canadian, and American. The Hans Crescent Club has also played against Cambridge University. Charities in the British Isles benefited as the club played against some of Britain's leading pro-golfers in exhibition matches devoting the proceeds to various worthy ones.

It is the belief of all who know Joe that, come the end of the war, we will hear more and more of him


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1595 ###]

873RD CHEMICAL COMPANY, AIR OPERATIONS (H or M) AAF STATION 166

3 May 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History

To: Headquarters 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army

1. This organization made no changes during the month of April 1944, that could be recorded as Unit History.

2. This organization performed usual Camp Duties from the period of 1 April 1944 to 30 April 1944 inclusive.

JOHN J. O'HARA
Captain, CWS
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1596 ###]

Auth: Serv Gp CO
Date: 30 Apr 44
Init:

1052nd Signal Company (SG)
53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 30 April 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. (ATTN: Group Historian)

1. Following is the March installment of the Unit History of this organization. Important changes were as follows:

a. Organization: Pvt Aaron K. Kraft, 16097032, 647, was transferred from Hq & Hq Sq on Special Orders Number 58 of Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, dated 5 April 1944. On Special Orders Number 117 of Headquarter, IX Air Service Command, dated 26 April 1944 Pvt Stanley J. Misura, 12192872, 647, and Pvt Harry M. Loxley, 35700030, 951, were transferred out of the organization, and Pfc Thomas H. Conn, 38434969, 647, was transferred from the 1053rd Signal Company, Service Group.

b. Strength: The Company was one man over normal strength for the greater part of the month.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. LT COLONEL FREEMAN T. CALDWELL, Commanding Officer of the Service Group, set May First as the readiness date for the Group, so the activities of the month were dominated by the conversion of "1919-F" into "52119", which entailed arranging for packing of all equipment, marking all cases, and planning the loading of vehicles, The organization's equipment can now be recognized by an orange ace of spades and the color code stripes buff, white, buff in addition to the number. On the eighth of the month the Company had a practice move on its own in which both teams participated and the vehicles cleared the base. All personnel of Team "A" participated in a practice move, acting on a directive from 1st AADA ordering the Team to move at noon on the thirteenth. All organizational and individual equipment had to be moved and amounted to about fifty tons for the 1052nd. Normal activities were carried on during the packing and during the moves.

3. Another important phase of preparations were two field problems performed by the 1052nd. In both cases the scene of operations was reached by compass. The first was a night problem in which blackout regulations had to be observed. The Company was honored by the presence of the Chaplain, CAPTAIN TRAVIS PURDY, who distinguished himself by a debate with the owner of the lend on which the operations were held on British farming methods as opposed to American. On the second problem the day was distinguished by the presence of the Group Executive Officer, LT COLONEL HARRY D. STONE, and on the way to the scene of operations the Colonel came upon CAPTAIN RIECK and LT CASSON on their hands and knees in the middle of the road. Their story was that they were orientating their map, but as the good Colonel observed a pub at the side of the road there was a doubt in his mind.

4. The Group had a gas alert week during which masks were carried all day and considerable gas was released. Our gas reconnaissance squad was employed and received training in their function. Under the direction of the Gas NCO, S/Sgt John J. Costello, Jr., each man tried on his impregnated clothing, and misfits were rectified. Drill was given in the use of protective covers. Apparently we were the first outfit to do so as we had a large audience,

5. There were air raids during the month on eight different nights. On one occasion flares were dropped illuminating the landing strips at Station 166 to almost daylight brilliance. Flak has never been heavy in this area as it's a fighter zone.

6. The population of the Company was considerably increased. In addition to the new men mentioned above the company cat had five kittens, and Sgt Costello had a son. Cpl Robert H. Paul, Cpl Clifford S. Jelliff, and Pvt Edward A. Olson each appeared with a puppy of debatable ancestry. Then too some of the boys who had best in this instance remain anonymous came back with a big old goose but sobered up in the morning and returned it to its owner.

7. The primary mission of a Signal] Company, Service Group, is to provide Signal supply and third echelon maintenance and repair of airborne Signal equipment to any type of Air Force group to which it may be assigned. In addition to this it must supply, install, operate, and maintain telephone, teletype, radio, and motor courier service to higher administrative and technical headquarters for the Group. All this may have to be accomplished under extreme battle conditions, and the company may be called upon at any time to provide its own protection. All this with one hundred men. This is further complicated by the new policy of breaking the Service Groups into two teams to service two Tactical Groups. The T/O now in effect made no provision for such an arrangement bringing about many difficulties, and it is proposed to discuss in this installment some of the problems encountered and give the breakdown of the company as worked out by this Organization. At first a plan was tried to break the company into two equal teams, but recent directives have indicated that the Company must consist of two equal teams of supply and repair and a third team of Headquarters and operations. The three teams must be prepared to work as one unit or individually at any distance from each other as the tactical situation may direct.

HEADQUARTERS SECTION


COMPANY COMMANDER:
CAPTAIN WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR., O-469001 0210


FIRST SERGEANT:
F/Sgt Robert (NMI) Gray 35262884 585


ADM & TECH CLERK:
S/Sgt Merhl W. Sulcer 33371646 405


SUPPLY SERGEANT:
T/5 Laurel C. Howard 39831883 405
Pvt Aven B. Moody 18125096 650


MOTOR TRANS NCO:
T/4 John J. Corsall, Jr. 12067069 813


CLERK TYPIST:
Sgt Jerome V. Lundblad 39280944 405
T/4 John M. McCarty 31062428 405
T/5 Robert H. Paul 33247036 405


AUTOMOBILE MECH:
T/5 Laverne J. Tiedeman 36246651 014
Pfc Lemoine C. Shaw 16024418 238


ARMORER:
Pvt Thomas J. Quirk, Jr. 11053211 511


COOK:
T/4 Ciro M. Montuori 12191777 060
T/5 Fred (NMI) Bedross 32872058 060


COOK'S HELPER:
Pvt Jimmie A. Holland 38274603 060


BASE DEFENSE:
Pvt Tom D. Olin 36735567 951

a. The original plan of dividing the Company into two equal detachments with Sergeant Sulcer acting as First Sergeant at 162 had to be abandoned. As D day and H hour approaches an increasing number of deadlines on reports of the condition of the Company must be met, frequent meetings and inspections to determine progress of preparations and other special activities such as direction of special training such as review of basic held nightly and special chemical warfare training, distribution of technical and administrative data, submitting of ten press releases weekly to the Public Relations Office, coordination with Red Cross and other special service activities, orientation lectures, physical training, etc., all of which must come from the Headquarters Section in addition to regular administrative duties could not be accomplished with the Section split up.

b. The Motor Section, otherwise known as the "Independent Freight Company" in spite of its able chief, Sgt Corsell, and his capable assistants could not operate divided between two teams because of sufficient equipment not being authorized. A sample of their difficulties is shown by the fact that when one vehicle lost its fan belt a new one could not be obtained. To keep the vehicle from being dead-lined the Section kept borrowing a fan belt from dead-lined vehicles of other outfits until a replacement finally arrived.

c. The Mess Section is another section which is inadequately supplied to service both teams. A feather in the cap of this section is the fact that it was at the instigation of the CO and the Mess Sergeant, T/4 Montuori, that the Service Group is getting new mess halls and kitchens which are much needed. The Mess Section volunteered and cooked pan cakes one night at the Red Cross Aero Club. There were two Promotions in the Section on Special Orders 56 of Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, dated 1 April 1944. Montuori was promoted from technician fifth grade to technician fourth grade, and Bedross was promoted from private to technician fifth grade.

d. A particularly harassed section has been Company Supply under Cpl Howard. Having nothing on Durante and his "Umbriago", Cpl Howard carried on alone at first with only the help of his "little Men". But the rigors of the job were so great that Howard found his little men goofing off on him, so he was given the assistance of Pvt Moody. But indications are that under the tri-division of the Company company supply will have an increasing role to play, and more personnel will be required.

8. The Company had hoped to be able to give equal and complete operations service to both teams, but it has been found to be impossible under existing conditions. The telephone facilities installed for Team "B" are still being operated at Station 162 by a skeleton staff, but the balance of the Operation Sections are now at Company Headquarters and are a part of the third division of the Company. Radio, teletype, and message center equipment has been removed from 162. Following is the personnel of the Operations Sections:

OPERATIONS SECTIONS

WIRE CHIEF
T/Sgt Jarvis J. Phillips 16043194 950

ASST WIRE CHIEF
S/Sgt John (NMI) Fischer 37471453 261

LINEMEN
T/4 Thomas J. Brennan 33712143 950
T/5 William W. Pinkerous 32240257 238
T/5 Anton (NMI) Klein 37287074 238
Pfc Leland (NMI) Johnson 37285804 950
Pfc Ormal P. Goodell 36554706 950
Pfc Robert A. Phelps 37493604 950
Pfc Calvin C. Hornbeck 15075230 238
Pfc Willie D. Risher 14099839 238

CHIEF TELEPHONE OPERATOR
Sgt Max W. Loop 35038489 537

ASST CHIEF TELEPHONE OPERATOR
T/5 Cecil P. Huff 34186357 650

OPERATORS
Pfc Charles L. Coley 36718896 650
Pfc Will T. Shiflet 38413103 650
Pfc Donald I. McCoy 16101404 650
Pvt Ernest F. Colbath 31114167 650
Pvt Walter J. Stilley 33786735 650

TELETYPE MECHANICS
T/4 Stanley A. Szoda 32241294 239
Pfc Robert J. Higgins 12059069 239

CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
S/Sgt Harold M. Bauer 37115135 237

ASST CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
Sgt Warren S. Parsons 34537736 237

TELETYPE OPERATORS
Pfc Richard E. Otis 36479127 237
Pfc Howard F. Fishcer 35684695 239
Pvt Ben T. Ware, Jr 34597673 237
Pvt George W. King 7025405 237

CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
T/Sgt Anthony J. Laraia 31045818 766

ASST CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
S/Sgt Robert G. Kampert 13152313 766

RADIO OPERATORS
T/4 Frank J. Squadrito 13098795 766
T/4 William F. Finn 31098430 766
T/5 Clifford S. Jelliff 12098430 766
T/5 Peter (NMI) Slata 33362208 766
T/5 Leland (NMI) Montgomery 15104546 766
Pfc Edward J. P. Murphy 11115777 766
Pfc Edward A. Olsen 12095760 766
Pvt Clarence C. Rankin, Jr 33301555 766

MESSAGE CENTER CHIEF
S/Sgt Raymond (NMI) Perry 34178024 667

ASST MESSAGE CENTER CHIEFS
Sgt Floyd H. VanGuilder 31114163 667
Sgt Florience R. Dicke, Jr 35336466 667

MESSAGE CENTER CLERKS
T/5 Edward J. Doyle 11088302 667
T/5 Meyer S. Finkelstein 12082078 667
Pvt Samuel (NMI) Ben 12096566 667
Pvt Kenneth H. Lincoln 12207730 667

MOTOR MESSENGERS
Pfc Willard M. Austin 12066999 695
Pfc James L. Drinnen 34186258 521

a. Since their installations were completed some time ago the Operations Sections under T/Sgts Phillips and Laraia spent most of their time in excess of normal duties preparing for overseas movement. Each section built its own boxes and did the marking, taking time off only when the Red Cross Clubmobile hove in sight. The wire section enlarges its sorely laden truck and special credit is due such men as Pfc Phelps whose skill with a saw and hammer did much to increase the space in the truck and make accessible the maze of equipment which must go into a wire truck. The Radio Operations Section has not completed its mobile radio station to be installed in its trailer, but since the boys promise something super-duper all eyes are upon them.

b, Another important phase of training and preparation was the field problems. On the night problem the Wire Section was a little late in arriving because Sgt Bauer get his wires crossed on reading a speedometer, but on the second one they laid five miles of wire in forty minutes and picked it up in one hour thus displaying speed and agility that was probably responsible for their coming out on top in the Company softball league.

c. The Teletype section has proven its service is one of the most important ones. At the Signal Center it is bearing an increasing burden of the traffic and has yet to have a complaint on its speed, efficiency, or maintenance. The Section also displayed a mobility in keeping with the desired policy. On the second field problem the Section had established communication within ten minutes and was complimented for ingenuity in using an abandoned bomb-shelter for the sight of their installation.

d. It was in the Message Center Section that it first became manifest that the Company had insufficient personnel and equipment to give operations service to both teams. The Section in the opinion of its chief, Sgt Perry, was well trained when it left the states, but upon reaching England the men had to be trained in the use of British codes and ciphers. Sgts Perry and Van Guilder were sent to school in Worcester, and this month Sgt Dicke worked for two weeks in the code room at 1st AADA, our next highest administrative headquarters, to learn further codes and to study procedure under on particular type of command. The importance of the contribution of a message center has long been underestimated, but the problem of coordinating communication for the Service Croup is en endless task. Operating on a 24 hour schedule, the section handled a traffic of 252 outgoing messages and 303 incoming messages for the month, and the very efficient courier drivers, Pfc Austin and Drinnen, made a total of ninety round trips to Station 162 and 169.

e. The Operations Sections suffered several casualties during the month. Pvt Ben has been wearing a cast on his foot as a result of an accident while on pass, and Pfc Fisher had a close one when he fell off a pole while repairing the line to Station 169. He struck a tin sign on the way down and had several stitches taken in his leg. In spite of their heavy routines, the boys of the Operations sections have been noteworthy in the regularity with which they have carried out almost nightly bicycle mission to the local pub, and many have returned home so flak-happy that they suffered injury from crash landings.

9. The two teams consisting of equal elements of supply and repair were divided as follows:

TEAM A
TEAM COMMANDER
2nd Lt William W. Pashwa O-1645273 500

#SUPPLY
WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
S/Sgt John J. Costello 12034091 821

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/5 Reece B. Drinnen 34186188 835

WAREHOUSEMEN
Cpl Cecil C. Summers 18039762 405
Pvt Joseph J. McFadden 31161569 237

#RADIO MAINTENANCE
RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/Sgt Vaughn W. Gagosian 31355338 647

ASST RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Donnis E. Taylor 34395374 954-5

AIRBORNE CHIEF
Sgt William W. Casey 36171752 647

AIRBORNE REPAIRMEN
T/5 William W. Craig 35800677 [blank]
Cpl Raymond N. Blair 33553738 951
Pvt Aaron K. Kraft 16097032 647

VHF REPAIR CHIEF
Sgt Joseph C. Bleiler 31090438 647

VHF REPAIRMEN
T/5 Tolbert J. Neibich 33506232 647
T/5 Edward E. Sheerer 33508965 647

RADAR REPAIRMEN
T/4 George C. Lewis 39324364 955
T/5 Richard M. Ramsbey 35541621 955
T/5 Herbert F. Worm 36243563 [blank]
Cpl George M. Parker, Jr 16085397 955
T/5 Finley M. Gleason, Jr 39024227 955

TEAM B
TEAM COMMANDER
1st Lt John M. Casson O-1643738 4400

#SUPPLY
WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/Sgt Frank A. Swider 33135179 252

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
Sgt Lawrence A. Brennan 12056692 252

WAREHOUSEMEN
T/5 Henry L. Pratt, Jr 38410858 835
T/5 John W. Depew 34186223 835

#RADIO MAINTENANCE
RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
M/Sgt Malcolm D. Raines 34231859 766

AIRBORNE RADIO CHIEF
T/5 William E. Siebold 31354795 647

AIRBORNE REPAIRMEN
T/5 Knowles R. Roberts 34820933 647
T/5 David S. Hymovitz 33054079 647
Pfc Thomas H. Conn 38434696 647

VHF REPAIR CHIEF
T/3 Francis S. Brownell 11039851 951

VHF REPAIRMEN
T/5 Bernard (NMI) Kastner 35220090 951
T/5 Simon H. Snider 38329725 [blank]

RADAR REPAIRMEN
T/5 Robert J. Martin 46245300 955
Cpl John S. Serick 32730107 955
T/5 William C. Finley 38318823 954-5
T/5 Richard C. Matthews 13150898 954-5
T/5 Frederick A. Hofmann 13159542 954
Pvt Morris (NMI) Novak 33786735 955

a. The Warehouse Section of each team built crates for its supplies which also serve as shelving in the warehouse. The Section at 162 had to rebuild theirs because of poor lumber supplied by the British the first time. Both Sections found that their track space was inadequate, so the vehicles were enlarged to hold a fifteen day level, but, if a thirty day level must be carried, the plan is to divide it into two fifteen day levels, take one, and have the second shipped separately. The Sections have found it very difficult to maintain their levels because of the Depot is often unable to fill requisitions. Loading supplies for the moves, marking as well as building cases, had to be accomplished in addition to regular duties of storage and issue, so the boys were really kept busy. The Section of Team "A" had a particularly rough month. In addition to all this work they had to sweat out the news of Sgt Costello's baby. On hearing the news the staff went on a short mission with the usual target, the local pub. On the return trip, Cpl Drinnen, known as "Possum" , encountered heavy flak forcing him so far off his course that he landed at the wrong field. This trip involved more then one crash landing, so Possum is sweating out the Purple Heart. There was one promotion in the section, John W. Depew was promoted from private first class to technician fifth grade.

b. The Radio Maintenance Sections of each Team were adding to their total ability to perform their mission. Many of the boys displayed unusual ingenuity in devising their own battery chargers, rectifiers, test setups, etc., made out of scrap to make up for equipment not available or not authorized. The Sections used their mobile repair trucks on field problems, and the Section of Team "A" was complemented by COLONEL STOME on their use of camouflage. Sgt Raines, T/5 Sheerer, and Pvt Loxley went to VHF school for two weeks, and T/3 Brownell and Sgt Bleiler went to the VHF maintenance shops at 2nd T&D for one day. Promotions for the month in the Section at 166 were as follows: Gagosian was promoted from staff sergeant to technical sergeant, Sheerer was promoted from private first class to technician fifth grade, and Craig was promoted from private to technician fifth grade. Sgt Gagosian has been giving lectures to the squadrons of the 391st Bomb Group (M) on operator maintenance and has received complements on the excellent job his section is doing. And while we are on the subject of bouquets for Radio Repair Cpl Blair informs the writer that he has received very flattering complements from two majors and several "minor" officers on his pin-up girls at the shop. The Radio Repair Section of team "A" had a very slow start in the Company softball league, justly earning the sobriquet of "Gugenheimer's Bloomer Girls", but the girls brought the month to a fitting conclusion by defeating 162 which had become the team to beat.

10, The Company has lost the services of one man, Cpl Olin, who spends all his time on the line in Base Defense. The Company now has an expert anti-aircraft man in Cpl Klein who went to Northern Ireland to school. Plans are being made to give other men practice in the use of the Organization's .50 cal machine gun,which is mounted on the wire truck.

11. The 1052nd is awaiting anxiously the big day of invasion and hopes each day that higher headquarters my see fit to authorize the extra equipment and personnel needed to perform its mission properly.

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1603 ###]


special orders for sig companies. names, ASN, but faint.

[### Reel B0818 - Page 1605 ###]

Auth: CO, 53rd S.G.
Date: 5 May 44
Initials:

1176TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY, SERVICE GP (AVN)
APO 149, US Army.

5 May 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History

To: Group Historian, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. The following is a subsequent installment of the Unit History of this organization for the month of April 1944.

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: (As of 30 April 44) 2 Officers 38 EM

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

DANIEL W. MAHONEY
1st Lieut., QMC
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1606 ###]

Auth: CO, Sta 166
Date: 30 Apr 44
Initials: ???

ANNEX III COMPANY HISTORY of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn) April 1 to 30, 1944

ORGANIZATION: The 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance. Co (Avn) was reorganized under T/O & E 9-417 dtd 29 Sent 43 effective 22 March 1944. (GO #41, Hq, IX Air Force Service Command dated 12 March 1944)

STRENGTH: 4 Officers 78 Enlisted Men 5 EM attached

MOVEMENT: Negative.

CASUALTIES: Negative.

DECORATIONS: Twenty-seven Enlisted Men of this organization were awarded the Good Conduct Medal for having, "during the past twelve months, demonstrated his fidelity through faithful and exact performance of duty, and efficiency through capacity to produce desired results, while the behavior of each has been such to deserve emulation". (GO #4, Hq, 53rd Service Croup, dated 2 April 1944)

The 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn) continue during the month of April 1944 performing its appointed tasks, rendering every possible service to the task force.

The Ammunition Section of this organization operating under the direction of 1st Lt Fred J. Werren and Technical Sergeant John W. Birnbaum, is worthy of special comment. Theirs is the uninspiring task of loading and unloading tons of explosives, of storing bombs and fuzes and ammunition and of preparing these items for delivery to the Continent. Though it is necessary for these men to work all hours of the day and night and in all types of weather, their willing cooperation speaks highly for both their leaders and for themselves.

On the 13th of April the company took part in a practice move made for the purpose of discovering and forestalling any shortcoming in our preparation for an actual move. On the 30th of April all preliminary preparations for an actual movement were completed.

During the month of April, 1944, the organization was commended by the Group Administrative Inspector for the excellence of its administrative records.

Deficiencies in training as regards Bomb Reconnaissance and unit defense were overcome. First Sergeant Gerald P. Vernon and Technical Sergeant John W. Birnbaum attended a one-week course in Bomb Reconnaissance. Corporal Raymond W. Burns and Technician 5th Grade Lambert N. Ratermen attended Anti-Aircraft Machine Gun School at Kilkeel, Ireland.

During the past month this organization lost its first men to civilians life and a first had close contact with enemy bombardment. Technician 3rd Grade Matthew F. Czarnecki departed this organization on April 5, 1944 for shipment beck to the United States where he is to receive a dependency discharge.

Technician 5th Grade Byron O. Saunders was the first man in the organization to have intimate contact with enemy bombardment. He was hospitalized at Braintree Hospital when a stray German bomb hit the hospital and leveled several of the wards. Technician 5th Grade Saunders luckily escaped without injury.

On April 5, 1544, invasion talk became the predominating factor in all conversation when all overnight passes and furloughs were stepped. Things returned to normal however on the 30th of the month when the overnight pass privilege was restored.

April 39, 1944, found the company operational at its present location, and capable of moving on short notice and carrying on with operations wherever directed


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1609 ###]

GO41.


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1610 ###]

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE GROUP

APO 149, US Army 2 April 1944

GENERAL ORDERS )
NUMBER 4 )

EXTRACT

1. Under the provisions of AR 600-68, 4 May 1943, and Memorandum No 35-18, Hq, Ninth Air Force, dtd 20 Dec 1943, the GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL is awarded to the following named personnel.

Each of the following named individuals, orgns as indicated, has, during the past twelve months, demonstrated his fidelity through faithful and exact performance of duty, and efficiency through capacity to produce desired results, while the behavior of each has been such to deserve emulation.

1589th Ord S & M Co (Avn)

T/Sgt John W. Birnbaum (505) 32602050
T/Sgt Thomas J. Bonanno (413) 32719386
Sgt Orville D. Beck (505) 37410215
Tec 4 Charles L. Cruthers (414) 32588348
Tec 4 Jimmie L. Dowie (014) 38274639
Tec 4 Russell F. Peddicord (348) 38274639
Tec 4 John L. Savage (256) 35508531
Tec 4 Walter ?. Schoenradt (114) 36543465
Tec 5 Louis P. Danek (256) 16156236
Tec 5 Everett R. Drescher (405) 31274695
Tec 5 Ralph ?. Harris (901) 35613608
Tec 5 Norman H. Jensen (056) 32631065
Tec 5 Leo M. Kerl (114) 32671634
Tec 5 Joseph F. Lesko (405) 31314496
Tec 5 Adam T. Morico (014) 31330518
Tec 5 Arthur ?. Kenman (405) 33471755
Tec 5 Kenneth J. Scheffner (931) 16156490
Tec 5 George T. Ziegler (405) 32754585
Pfc Jim L. Brandon (014) 38327782
Pfc Joseph J. Dumler, Jr (835) 33390439
Pfc Chester W. Gale (056) 39021607
Pfc Morris C. Keller (901) 33487890
Pfc Lonnie F. Kindrick (521) 34525947
Pfc Ralph A. Lytle (050) 39833335
Pfc Warren E. Powers (060) 32836591
Pfc Thomas (NMI) Rutherford (521) 33438935
Pfc Charles I. Wall (911) 34456698

By order of Lieutenant Colonel CALDWELL:

Frank E. Robins, Jr.,
Captain, Air Corps,
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1611 ###]

Auth: CO, AAF 162
Initials:

1812th ORDNANCE SUPPLY & MAINTENANCE CO. Avn.
Office of the Company Commander
Service Team "B", 53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 5 April 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History.

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, U.S. Army. THRU: Commanding Officer, Service Team "B", 53rd Service Group.

1. In compliance with paragraph 3, letter, Hq 53rd Service Group, dated 23 January 1944, Subject "Unit Histories", the following report is submitted:

A. Organizational: Negative.

B, Strength: 30 April 1944 - 76 EM, 3 Officers,

C. Date of arrival or departure of Station: Negative.

D. Awards to & Decorations of Members: Negative.

2. The past month produced an acceleration in all phases of Ordnance activities. The unit has been called upon to exert itself to the utmost not only to perform its prescribed mission but also to accomplish various tasks incident to the efficient operation of the base. The Tactical Group has learned that our special tools and equipment can produce tools and instruments to aid them in their work. Also that we can repair and maintain many tools which were formerly salvaged.

3. The unit is operating much more efficiently than ever before. The attitude and spirit in which the men are performing their assigned tasks is noteworthy. To our section leaders, M/Sgt Godby, F/Sgt Kuch, T/Sgt Dancik, T/Sgt Jenkins and T/Sgt Bazzani, goes much of the credit for the company’s commendable record of activity during the past month.

4. A good deal of emphasis has been placed upon physical training. All men receive some sort of planned exercise each day and a great deal of interest is being shown in the company baseball league which has been drawn up. At present, three teams have been organized and are playing each other on scheduled nights. Later on a company team will be organized to compete with other company teams.

5. All personnel shortages have been received. Replacements received last month are rapidly becoming efficient in their work. In addition to technical training each member of the organization is receiving a weeks course of instruction concerning the basic principles of soldiering.

MICHAEL B. HEINDL
Capt, Ord Dept.
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1612 ###]

Auth: CG 9th AAF
Init:
Date: 5 May 1944

HEADQUARTERS 2198TH QUARTERMASTER TRUCK COMPANY AVN 53rd SERVICE GP
APO 149, US ARMY

5 May 1944

UNIT HISTORY, for Month April 1944:

1. ORGANIZATION: Negative.

2. STRENGTH: a. 3 Enlisted Men assigned. b. 1 Enlisted Man transferred.

TOTAL STRENGTH

3 Officers 98 Enlisted Men

3. MOVEMENT: Negative.

4. CASUALTIES: Negative.

5. DECORATIONS: Negative.

6. Month of April was just another month in the Army. Company was for a period of ten days, separated into 4 Detachments, operating from Station 166, Station 162, Station 164, and Station 358. At completion of temporary duty detachments reformed into Headquarters Detachment, at Station 166, and Detachment "A", at Station 162. Unit for the most part continued to perform duties of a Quartermaster Truck Company attached to Service Teams of a Service Group.

PAUL S. GLICK
1st Lieut., QMC
Commanding


[###Reel B0818 - Page 1613###]

Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "In front of 1052nd Tent City."
Standing:
T/5 Peter (NMI) Slata 33362208
T/5 Laurel C. Howard 39831883
Sitting:
T/4 Thomas J. Brennan 33711752
T/5 William W. Pinkerous 32240257


[###Reel B0818 - Page 1614###]

Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Practice Move."
Left to right:
Pfc Edward J. P. Murphy 11115777 (eating)
T/4 William F. Finn 31094246 (being served)
Pvt Ben T. Ware, Jr 34597673
T/5 Peter (NMI) Slata 33362208 (facing camera)
S/Sgt Harold M. Bauer 37115135 (last at right)


[###Reel B0818 - Page 1615/6###]

Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "T/5 Robert H. Paul 33247036, and the puppies on Practice Move."
Left to right:
T/5 Edward J. Doyle 11088302 667
Sgt Floyd H. VanGuilder 31114163 667
Sgt Florience R. Dicke, Jr 35336466 667
Pfc Willie D. Risher 14099839 238
T/4 Ciro M. Montuori 12191777 060
Pfc Robert A. Phelps 37493604 950


[###Reel B0818 - Page 1617###]

Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Simulated Gas Attack during Practice Move."


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1619 ###]

AUTH: CO Sta 166
DATE: 11 June 1944
INITIALS:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE GROUP

APO 149, US Army 11 June 1944

In reply refer to: 300.6

SUBJECT: Installments of Unit Histories. TO: Commanding General, Ninth Air Force Service Command, APO 149, US Army.

Transmitted herewith in compliance with par 5, Memo 20-10, IX AFSC, 5 Feb 1944, installments of unit histories for organizations this group are forwarded for your information.

PAUL J. WEXLER
1st Lt., A. C., Gp Hist O.

Incls: Unit Histories.

[Abridged]

FRANK E. ROBINS, JR.,
Captain, Air Corps,
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1620 ###]

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP
APO 149 US ARMY

3 April 1944

SUBJECT: Monthly Installment of Unit History

To: Group Historical Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with memorandum, Hqs, IX Air Force Service Command, No. 20-10, dated 5 February 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 26 Officers and 128 Enlisted Men.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. This unit is at the present time stationed at AAF Station #166, with Team "A" of the 53rd Service Group. The Finance Section and (3) three men of the Chemical Warfare Section of this unit is at Station #162 with Team "B" of the 53rd Service Group.

WALTER N. ARMBRUSTER,
1st Lt., Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1621 ###]

AUTH: CO Sta 162
DATE: 5 Apr 1944
INITIALS:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE SQUADRON
Office of the Commanding Officer

APO 149 US ARMY 5 April 1944

In reply to refer to: 300.6

SUBJECT: Unit History.

To: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with letter, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army, dated 23 January 1944, subject, Unit Histories, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: None.

b. Strength: O-6, WO-2, EM-217.

c. Movement: None.

d. Casualties: None.

e. Decorations: None.

2. Organization performing 3rd Echelon Maintenance on B26s for the 387th Bombardment Group (M).

THOMAS M. BARTON,
Major, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1622 ###]

AUTH: CO Sta 162
Date: 5 June 1944
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE SQUADRON
Office of the Commanding Officer

APO 149, US Army 5 June 1944

In reply refer to: 300.6

SUBJECT: Unit History

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with letter, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army, dated 23 January 1944, subject, Unit Histories, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: None.

b. Strength: O-7, WO-1, EM-215.

c. Movement: None.

d. Casualties: None.

e. Decorations: None.

2. Organization performing 3rd Echelon Maintenance on B26s for the 387th Bombardment Group (M).

IRWIN L. UNGERLEIDER
Capt., Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1623 ###]

AUTH: CO 9AF
DATE: 11 June 1944
INITIALS:

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP
APO 149 US ARMY

5 June 1944

SUBJECT: Monthly Installment of Unit History

To: Group Historical Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with memorandum, Hqs, IX Air Force Service Command, No. 20-10, dated 5 February 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 30 Officers and 126 Enlisted Men.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. This unit is at the present time stationed at AAF Station #166, with Team "A" of the 53rd Service Group. The Finance Section and seven (7) enlisted men of this unit is at AAF Station 162 with Team "B" of the 53rd Service Group.

For the Commanding Officer:

ROBERT M. LICK,
1st Lt., A. C,, Squadron Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1624 ###]

Auth: OG Ninth AF
Initials:
5 June 1944

40TH MOBILE R & R SQUADRON AAF Station 166

APO 149 US Army 5 June 1944

314.7

Unit History, May 1944

1. Organization: Negative.

2. Strength: a. Officers 7, F/O 1. b. Enlisted Men 169

3. Movement: Negative.

4. Casualties: Negative.

5. Decorations: Negative.

Nineteen enlisted men were promoted June 1st. The promotions included two S Sgts, 15 Cpls, and 4 Pfcs. the men were promoted per Per 4, SO 78, 53rd Service Group.

Nineteen enlisted men, all pvts, were assigned during the month from the 13th RCD. Before those men joined the organization they were sent to an Airplane Sheet Metal School, at an RAF base in Wheston. After a three week course in theory in sheet metal work they became part of the squadron.

There new men are now assigned to on the job training in the mobile units. Six of them have been transferred to Detachment "A". The average age of these men is 18 and their army life is about six months.

Two new officers were assigned per Par 1, SO 115 1st AADA, IX AFSC. 1st Lt Wayne Jessup and F/O Robert S Riverman. Lt Jessup was with the organization three days, when he was assigned to the 87th Service Squadron. F/O Riverman was assigned to duty as AAF Supply Officer, Air.

The month of June was a busy month for the Units on the Line. A total of 21 ships were assigned for Repair and 7 Ships for salvage. 18 hours a day began a resigned factor, for the men.

Passes and time off became a subject for discussion rather than an actuality. Nevertheless, morale is up because the men are happy in their work. They can see what they have accomplished. It is a far cry from the months back when details were the only duties to be had.

Range practice was enjoyed by the entire organization, during the month. Each man fired on the 200 yard range at a nearby RAF target range.

The squadron's softball team is holding its own on the Base. Having lost two out of seven games played, it stands second in the Post standing. It proves good relaxation for the men both for the players and the side line rooters.

JAMES H. HYSLER, Jr
1st Lt., AC
Security Office


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1626 ###]

Auth: CO 9AF
Date: 4 Jan 44
Init:

87th Service Squadron

APO 149, US Army 5 June 1944.

SUBJECT: Squadron History (Installment V, 31 May 1944)

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with letter, Hq, 53rd Service Group, Subject: Unit History, 23rd January 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 7 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers, 223 Enlisted Men.

c. Arrived AAF Station 173, Dunkeswell, near Honiton, Devon, 28 July 1943. Departed AAF Station 173 and arrived at AAF Station 162, Chipping Ongar, Essex, 13 November 1943. Departed AAF Station 162, 27 December 1943 and arrived at AAF Station 166, Matching Green, Essex, 27 December 1943.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations and Awards: Negative.

2. Invasion is at hand. Column after column in the English newspapers during the month of May were devoted to invasion conjecture. Newspapers printed in the U. S. flashed 3 inch headlines on invasion dates. Nervousness was evident everywhere. The "War of Nerves" had reached its climax. Invasion date pools were taken up amongst the military personnel. The Allied Armies launched their great attack: successfully in Italy and pushed ahead steadily. Now was the time. General Eisenhower had spoken. The Air Forces were working overtime in pulverizing the Nazis over the Continent of Europe. Who should know better then the tired air crews returning from missions over enemy territory. Twice a day they were briefed. Twice a day they clambered aboard their B-26 ships and roared off toward their targets. Twice a day they returned (most of them), weary but satisfied with their work. There was little or no time for play because the job at hand was too great. There was hardly time enough to get their proper rest and food. They were doing a job. The Invasion Chief had been true to his word.

5. Fighter opposition, while negligible, was compensated by extremely effective Ack-Ack fire. Again the Service Squadron was called upon to put the battered planes into flying condition. To increase bombing efficiency and prevent weak raids a pool of 12 B-26 planes was organized. This did guarantee the crews a ship to perform their missions as many a time it was necessary to sign out a new ship to the crew while their ship was being put into operational condition. The Mechanics worked against time and succeeded in putting into flyable condition the ships that had been too battered to fly a few days earlier. Morale was high. Give the boys something with which to occupy their minds and bodies and they are happy. No one griped against working until 2 or 3 AM or being literally yanked out of bed to unlimber their tools for the job at hand.

4. The Engineering Section showed "Work Orders” for 40 ships during the month of May repaired by the Mobile Units and the shops. Out of these 40 ships, 35 consisted of battle damage repairs while 5 were modifications. Following is a facsimile of a Work Order done on one B-26 during the month of May. This is one job:

AIRPLANE WORK SHEET

WORK ORDER J

Airplane Type B-26-C45 AC #107620 Date 4-28-44 Airplane time 89:10

Airplane assigned to: 87th Service Squadron

Engine Type R-2800-43 Engine Time Left 89:10, Right 89:10 Propeller Type Curtiss Elec Prop Time Left 89:10, Right 89:10

Forms Received #41 x 60A x 50b x 61 x 1 x

Work to be done:

L Engine Throttle Control Cable to be replaced
L Engine throttle control fiber pulley to be replaced
L Engine throttle prop and mixture control brace to be replaced
R Wing aileron control cable to be replaced
R Engine No 5 cylinder remove and replace
No 2 and 4 gas cells remove and replace
Stringer between No 2 and 4 gas cells repair
Hole in gas cell plate right side reinforce and repair
Large hole on right side between engine and fuse reinforce and repair
Hole in right rear bomb bay door repair
Hole in right forward bomb bay door repair
Large hole on right side between engine and fuse reinforce
Four sections of air duct by co-pilot replace
Patch hole right side horizontal S. leading edge
Patch hole right side horizontal S. center of under side
Patch hole right side elevator trim tab under side
Patch hole right side in elevator fabric lead edge
Patch hole right side elevator fabric under side
Patch hole left side elevator fabric under side
Patch hole right side H. Sta. top center
Patch hole right side H. Sta. top center
Patch hole right side elevator trim tab on top
Patch hole right side elevator fabric on top
Patch hole right side H. Sta. on top next to V-Finn.
Patch hole right side vertical fin (center top)
Patch hole left side elevator fabric (tip)
Patch hole right side fuse rear bottom
Patch hole right side fuse rear forward to waist gun
Patch hole right side fuse below top turret
Patch hole right side fuse forward top turret
Patch hole right side fuse forward top turret
Patch hole right side fuse forward top turret
Patch hole bottom fuse forward to waist gun
Patch hole bottom side right wing outboard
Patch hole right aileron (fabric)
Patch hole right engine nacelle right side
Patch hole in cowling on bottom side right engine

Patch hole on right wing top side outboard
Patch hole on top side right wing flap
Patch hole on under side right wing flap
Patch hole Right wing leading edge inboard
Patch hole right aileron top side
Patch hole on top of fuse forward of top turret
Patch hole in right wing top inboard
Patch hole in left wing tip
Patch hole in left wing tip leading edge
Patch hole in fuse top rear of co-pilot escape hatch
Patch hole right side under co-pilot window
Patch hole left sides above nose wheel door
Patch hole in fuse left side next to armor plate
Patch hole in fuse right side above nose wheel door
Patch hole in right half of nose wheel door
Patch hole in fuse bottom forward of bomb bay door
Patch hole in left bomb bay door left lower section
Patch hole in left bomb bay door in left lover section
Patch hole in left bomb bay door top section rear
Patch hole in left bomb bay door left section middle
Patch hole in left bomb bay door lower section inside
Patch hole in left bomb bay door inside
Patch hole in catwalk under side FBB
Patch hole in catwalk under side RBB
Patch hole in right bomb bay door between sections
Patch hole in right bomb bay door (rear) back side inside window
Patch hole in right bomb bay door (rear) top side window (inside)
Patch hole in right bomb bay door (rear) to front of window (inside)
Patch hole in right bomb bay door (rear) back side window (inside)
Patch hole in right bomb bay door (rear) rear part outside
Patch hole in right bomb bay door (rear) top side window outside)
Patch hole in right bomb bay door (rear) back of window (outside)
Patch hole in right bomb bay door (rear) front side of window (outside)
Patch hole left engine nacelle rear end
Patch hole on inside of fuse in bulkhead forward of tail gunners comp.
Patch hole inside fuse in stringer under emergency door (tail gunner)
Patch hole in stringer right forward of waist gun
Patch hole in stringer right forward waist gun
Patch hole in stringer right forward of waist gun
Patch hole in stringer right forward of waist gum
Patch hole in stiffner on bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in stiffner on bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in bulkhead at rear of rear bomb bay door
Patch hole in center bulkhead of rear of bomb bay
Patch hole in bulkhead rear of forward bomb bay
Patch hole in bulkhead and stringer rear of forward bomb bay
Patch hole in floor under co-pilot seat
Patch hole under pilot seat
Remove and replace engine fire extinguisher under co-pilot seat

Remove and replace hydraulic line under pilot seat
Remove and replace de-icer line in front right bomb bay comp
Remove and replace vacuum line in nose wheel well
Remove and replace fifteen lines in leading edge of right wing inboard (vacuum hyd de-icer fire extinguisher etc lines)
Remove and replace prop relay cable in leading edge of fight wing
Check brake clearance
Pull retraction test
Check all controls
Change both main LDG Tires
Patch hole in left engine cowling
Put on hydraulic pumps

Airplane OK for Flight Test, Date 5-19-44
Foreman /S/ T/Sgt O'Donnell
Airplane inspected and OK'd for Flight Test, date 5-19-44 Inspector T/Sgt H. Mann /S/
Airplane completed, Ready for Delivery, Date 5-19-44 Foreman [blank]
Date Airplane delivered 5-19-44
Airplane Inspected, Found OK for Delivery, Date 5-19-44 Inspector T/Sgt Panowicz /S/

End Work Order

5. While the Mobile Units are assigned the repair jobs on the ships no small portion of the work done or them belongs to the various shops supporting the mobile units. One of the shops is the Dope & Fabric & Paint Shop. During the month of May the shop has on record work Orders for the following jobs: Repairs to 5 rudder assemblies, repairs to 7 ailerons, repairs to 6 elevator assemblies, and painting of insignias on 2 ships. In addition the boxes made for overseas packing were painted and stenciled with code insignia by this shop, entire airplanes spray painted, and all vehicles assigned to the Engineering Section are kept in good paint condition by this shop.

WESLEY B. GOVER, JR,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1630 ###]

Auth: CG 9AF
Date: 11 June 1944
Initials:

1176TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY, SERVICE GP (AVN)
APO 149, US Army.

11 June 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History

To: Group Historian, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. The following is a subsequent installment of the Unit History of this organization for the month of May 1944.

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: (As of 31 May 1944) 2 Officers 39 EM

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

DANIEL W. MAHONEY
1st Lieut., QMC
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1631 ###]

Annex IV May 1, 1944 to may 31, 1944 COMPANY HISTORY of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn)

Organization: Negative.

Strength: 4 Officers, 78 Enlisted Men, 5 EM attached.

Casualties: Negative.

Decorations: Negative


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1633 ###]

1812th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co. Avn
Office of the Company Commander
Service Team "B", 53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 6 June 1944

Subject: Unit History.

To: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. Thru: Commanding Officer, Service Team "B", 53rd Service Group.

1. In compliance with Paragraph 3, letter Hq 53rd Service Group, dated 23 January 1944, Subject "Unit Histories", the following report is submitted:

A. Organizational: Negative.

B. Strength: 31 May 1944: 77 EM, 3 Officers

C. Date of arrival or departure of Station: Negative.

E. Awards to & Decorations of members: Negative.

2. The month of May has been an exceptionally busy month for us. Practically all sections have had a record month of activity. As we look beck upon it we can take justifiable price in our accomplishments.

A. Lt Wardell joined the organization the early part of the month and being assigned Ammunition Officer, fell into a real hot bed of activity. His initiative and organizational ability in addition to his friendly and cooperative spirit made him truly a valuable asset to the organization. His subsequent transfer out of the outfit, the letter part of the month, has disappointed the entire company.

B. The automotive section, under Lt Sandels, has, in conjunction with the supply section under Lt. Silesky, accomplished what we have long thought to be an impossibility on this base, namely, bringing the deadline vehicle report to show less than ten vehicles. Supply did a noteworthy job in getting parts required to keep 'em rolling and the men of the Automotive Shop used ability and ingenuity in accomplishing this success. We are going to try hard to keep it this way.

C. The supply of ordnance organizational equipment on this field will soon be a moot question inasmuch as practically all major requirements have been filled. The recent arrival of Capt. Bettinger as Service S-4 Officer and Lt. McGovern as Service Team Ordnance Officer has aided the supply situation materially.

MICHAEL B. HEINDL
Capt., Ord. Dept.
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1634 ###]

Auth: CG 9th AAF
Init:
Date: 5th June 1944

HEADQUARTERS 2198TH QUARTERMASTER TRUCK COMPANY AVN 53rd SERVICE GP
APO 149, US ARMY

5th June 1944

UNIT HISTORY, for Month of May 1944:

1. ORGANIZATION: Negative.

2. STRENGTH: a. 1 Officer, assigned and joined. b. 1 Enlisted Man, assigned and joined. c. 7 Enlisted Men, transferred.

TOTAL STRENGTH

4 Officers 94 Enlisted Men

3. MOVEMENT: Negative.

4. CASUALTIES: Negative.

5. DECORATIONS: Negative.

6. During month of May, Unit continued to operate and perform duties of a Quartermaster Truck Company attached to Service teams of a Service Group. One Officer, 1st Lt EWELL E. WRIGHT, was assigned and joined. The seven enlisted men transferred were overages in the organization.

PAUL S. GLICK
1st Lieut., QMC
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1635 ###]

Auth: Serv Gp CO
Date: 31 May 44
Init:

1052nd Signal Company (SG)
53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 31 May 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. (ATTN: Group Historian)

1. The following is the May installment of the Unit History of this Organization. Changes were as follows:

a. Organization: Sergeant Max W. Loop, 35038489, (097) was transferred from the Company by Special Orders Number 131, Hq, 1st AADA, IX AF C, dated 25 May 1944, and Pvt Morris Novack, 33786735, (955) was transferred to the 53rd Service Squadron, Station 162, on Memorandum of Hq, 53rd Service Group on the 28th of May.

b. With the transfer of the above two men the Company was two EM below strength at the end of the month.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. The following EM of this organization received the GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL on General Orders Number 6, Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 10 May 1944:

S/Sgt Harold M. Bauer (237) 37115135
T/5 Fred Bedross (060) 32872058
Pvt Samuel Ben (667) 12096566
Cpl Raymond N. Blair (951) 33553738
Sgt Lawrence A. Brennan (252) 12056692
T/5 Edward J. Doyle (667) 11088302
Pfc James L. Drinnen Jr. (521) 34186258
T/5 Meyer S. Finkelstein (667) 12082078
Pfc Howard F. Fischer (239) 35684695
S/Sgt John Fischer (261) 37471453
T/5 William C. Finley (955) 38718823
T/Sgt Vaughn W. Gagosian (647) 31355338
Pfc Ormel P. Goodell, Jr. (950) 36554706
Pfc Robert J. Higgins (239) 12059069
T/5 Frederic A. Hofman (955) 13150542
T/5 Laurel C. Howard (405) 39831883
S/Sgt Robert O. Kampert (766) 13152313
T/4 George G. Lewis (955) 39324364
Pvt Kenneth H. Lincoln (677) 12207730
Sgt Jerome V. Lundblad (405) 39280944
T/5 Leland Montgomery (766) 15104546
T/5 Richard C. Matthews (955) 13150898
T/4 Ciro M. Montuori (060) 12191777
T/5 Tolbert J. Neibich (647) 33506232
Pfc Charles L. Coley (650) 36718896
Pfc Richard E. Otis (237) 36479127
T/4 George M. Parker Jr. (955) 39034227
Sgt Warren S. Parsons (237) 34537736
Pfc Robert A. Phelps (950) 37493604
T/5 Byrne W. Pike (955) 39844307
T/5 Henry L. Pratt Jr. (835) 38410858
T/5 Richard M. Ramsbey (955) 35541621
Pfc John S. Sarick (955) 32730107
T/5 Simon H. Snider (955) 38329725
T/4 Frank J. Squadrito (766) 13098795
T/4 Donnis E. Taylor (955) 34395374
Pvt Ben T. Ware Jr. (237) 34597673

2. May did not bring the long awaited invasion but was the occasion of an almost continuous air assault on fortress Europe with our Marauders specializing in the destruction of railroad marshalling yards and Hitler's Nest Wall. There were retaliatory raids on the coast of England there were purp alerts in our area but no air action during the entire month. This month the 1052nd Signal Company completed six months overseas service. By the first the Company paraphernalia was ready for overseas movement, but many changes and improvements have been made in cases, marking, and packing, personnel was shifted around, and changes and additions to plans continued to come in from higher headquarters. The Air Force changed a number of Specialist Serial Numbers, so a number of men had to be reclassified. An interesting change was the announcement of an addition to our mission is the responsibility for clearing the sites of our installations and line routes of mines and booby-traps. To accomplish this this Corporal Herbert F. Worm was sent to school at an Engineer Station at Newbury, Berkshire, to study camouflage, mines, and booby-traps, and the Company is to be authorized a minesweeper.

3. Operations in the Service Group now begin each day with a mass reveille in the best OCS tradition, accompanied by a bugle at 166. In the personnel division three more men who were part of the operations section at Station 162, S/Sgt Fischer, Pfcs Higgins and Hornbeck, were transferred to 166, and transferred from Headquarters to Team "B" was the black and white kitten. The Company is now two under strength with the loss of Sgt Loop and Pvt Novack, but the ranks were increased early in the month when Sgt Van Guilder, T/4 McCarty, and Pfc Colbath, the three "sap squeezers" from Vermont, each acquired a baby crow. It is rumored that Colbath, better known as "Coldshower", sat up all one night swearing at his bird hoping to teach it to cuss.

HEADQUARTERS SECTION

COMPANY COMMANDER:
CAPTAIN WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR. O-469001 0210

FIRST SERGEANT:
F/Sgt Robert (NMI) Gray 35262884 502

ADM & TECH CLERK:
S/Sgt Merhl W. Sulcer 33371646 275

SUPPLY SERGEANT:
T/5 Laurel C. Howard 39831883 821

SUPPLY CLERKS:
T/5 Peter Slata 33362208 766
Sgt Jerome V. Lundblad 39280944 405
Pvt Aven B. Moody 18125096 650

MOTOR TRANS NCO:
T/4 John J. Corsall, Jr. 12067069 014

CLERK TYPIST:
T/4 John M. McCarty 31062428 405
T/4 Byrne W. Pike 39844307 955

AUTOMOBILE MECH:
T/5 Laverne J. Tiedeman 36246651 014
Pfc Lemoine C. Shaw 16024418 5?0

ARMORER:
Pvt Anton Klein 37287074 511

COOK:
T/4 Ciro M. Montuori 12191777 060
T/5 Fred Bedross 32872058 060

COOK'S HELPER:
Pvt Jimmie A. Holland 38274603 060

BASE DEFENSE:
Pvt Tom D. Olin 36735567 647

4. In the Company Supply Section Sgt Jerry Lundblad, who returned from a month in the hospital, is going aver the Company supply records while recuperating. The Mess Section moved into its much needed new kitchen which Pfc Murphy promptly named "Ye Olde Dehydrated Shoppee". A talent in the Section heretofore concealed was uncovered when T/5 Freddie Bedross joined the cast of the base production, "Flak Happy", as a female impersonator and exponent of jitterbugging. The Motor Section has justified its claim to the title of the most mobile section in the organization as it moved bag and baggage for the fourth time since arrival at the base. This time the Section drove its tent pegs back in the same holes that were used when the Section first arrived on the Matching Base. Sgt Corsall, the Section Chief, went to school at Ordnance Depot, O-616, at Halstead, to study waterproofing vehicles. Training within the Company has been extensive and varied. At Station 166 review of the school of the soldier was carried on throughout the month, and at 162 defense school continued; the last commands in the Company is its newest member, Pfc Conn. At 166 Cpl Blair presided at classes in Chemical Warfare training. Having just returned from school in Northern Ireland, Cpl Klein took over the fob of Company armorer in addition to his regular duties, and during the month instructed every man at Headquarters in firing, disassembly, and assembly of the .50 cal. machine gun. Every man at 166 fired the carbine and the men having a Thompson sub machine gun fired their weapon during the month. Two more men with instructor ability were unearthed in the Company when Sgt Van Guilder and T/4 McCarty interrupted a pub mission to lecture local children in class on American culture.

OPERATIONS SECTIONS

WIRE CHIEF
T/Sgt Jarvis J. Phillips 16043194 950

ASST WIRE CHIEF
S/Sgt John (NMI) Fischer 37471453 261

LINEMEN
T/4 Thomas J. Brennan 33712143 950
T/5 William W. Pinkerous 32240257 238
Pfc Leland (NMI) Johnson 37285804 950
Pfc Ormal P. Goodell 36554706 950
Pfc Robert A. Phelps 37493604 950
Pfc Calvin C. Hornbeck 15075230 238
Pfc Willie D. Risher 14099839 238
Pfc Will T. Shiflet 38413103 238

CHIEF TELEPHONE OPERATOR
T/5 Cecil P. Huff 34186357 650

TELEPHONE OPERATORS
Pfc Charles L. Coley 36718896 650
Pfc Donald I. McCoy 16101404 650
Pvt Ernest F. Colbath 31114167 650
Pvt Walter J. Stilley 33786735 650

OPERATORS
Pfc Robert J. Higgins 12059069 239

CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
S/Sgt Harold M. Bauer 37115135 237

ASST CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
Sgt Warren S. Parsons 34537736 237

TELETYPE OPERATORS
Pfc Richard E. Otis 36479127 237
Pfc Howard F. Fischer 35684695 237
Pvt Ben T. Ware, Jr 34597673 237
Pvt George W. King 7025405 237

CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
T/Sgt Anthony J. Laraia 31045818 766

ASST CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
S/Sgt Robert G. Kampert 13152313 766

RADIO OPERATORS
T/4 Frank J. Squadrito 13098795 766
T/4 William F. Finn 31098430 766
T/5 Clifford S. Jelliff 12098430 766
T/5 Leland (NMI) Montgomery 15104546 766
T/5 Robert H. Paul 33247036 405
Pfc Edward J. P. Murphy 11115777 766
Pfc Edward A. Olsen 12095760 766
Pvt Clarence C. Rankin, Jr 33301555 766

MESSAGE CENTER CHIEF
S/Sgt Raymond (NMI) Perry 34178024 667

ASST MESSAGE CENTER CHIEFS
Sgt Floyd H. VanGuilder 31114163 667
Sgt Florience R. Dicke, Jr 35336466 667

MESSAGE CENTER CLERKS
T/5 Edward J. Doyle 11088302 667
T/5 Meyer S. Finkelstein 12082078 667
Pvt Samuel (NMI) Ben 12096566 667
Pvt Kenneth H. Lincoln 12207730 667
Pvt Thomas J. Quirk 11053211 667

MOTOR MESSENGERS
Pfc Willard M. Austin 12066999 590
Pfc James L. Drinnen 34186258 590

TELETYPE MECHANICS
T/5 Peter (NMI) Slata 33362208 766

5. In the Operations Section the Radio Operators were the fair haired boys of the month. First, with the help of the Teletype Operator Section they walked away with the plumb of the year, the championship of the Company softball league. Secondly, in their radio trailer they turned out one of the neatest installations in the Company. By building compact containers they have installed one ton of equipment constituting a complete radio station. So economically has the small amount of space available in a trailer been utilized personnel will have ample room to carry on operations within the trailer. The Communications Sections in the Signal Center, better known as "Vacation Valley”, handled the heaviest month's traffic of the year. Particularly in the Telephone Section was the increase so evident. The line to Station 162 was simplexed to handle increased traffic, and about 250 personal telephone calls were handled by the Section amounting to about $75 in tolls. The Message Center sent T/5 Doyle to 1st Advanced Air Depot Area to study British codes and ciphers and T/5 Finkelstein to a British school in Oxford, Oxfordshire, to study the same subject. Of great significance regarding the future was the receipt of Ninth Air Force SOP's covering procedure upon arrival across the channel. T/4 Brennen brought honor to his Section and the Company as the only man from the Company competing in a track and field meet held on the Base. He won first place in the discus throw and second in the shot put. All the personnel of the Wire Section are now men since Pfc Bobby Phelps became twenty-one this month.

TEAM A
TEAM COMMANDER
2nd Lt William W. Pashwa O-1645273 500

#SUPPLY
WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
S/Sgt John J. Costello 12034091 581

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/5 Reece B. Drinnen 34186188 835

WAREHOUSEMEN
Cpl Cecil C. Summers 18039762 405
Pvt Joseph J. McFadden 31161569 835

#RADIO MAINTENANCE
RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/Sgt Vaughn W. Gagosian 31355338 647

ASST RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Donnis E. Taylor 34395374 955

AIRBORNE RADIO CHIEF
Sgt William W. Casey 36171752 647

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 William W. Craig 35800677 647
Cpl Raymond N. Blair 33553738 647
Pvt Aaron K. Kraft 16097032 647

VHF RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
Sgt Joseph C. Bleiler 31090438 951

VHF RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Edward E. Sheerer 33508965 951
T/5 Tolbert J. Neibich 33506232 647

RADAR REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 George C. Lewis 39324364 955

RADAR REPAIRMEN
T/5 Richard M. Ramsbey 35541621 955
T/5 Herbert F. Worm 36243563 955
Cpl George M. Parker, Jr 16085397 955
T/5 Finley M. Gleason, Jr 39024227 955

TEAM B
TEAM COMMANDER
1st Lt John M. Casson O-1643738 4400

#SUPPLY
WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/Sgt Frank A. Swider 33135179 581

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
Sgt Lawrence A. Brennan 12056692 821

WAREHOUSEMEN
T/5 Henry L. Pratt, Jr 38410858 835
T/5 John W. Depew 34186223 835

#RADIO MAINTENANCE
RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
M/Sgt Malcolm D. Raines 34231859 955

AIRBORNE RADIO CHIEF
T/5 William E. Siebold 31354795 647

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Knowles R. Roberts 34820933 647
T/5 David S. Hymovitz 33054079 647
Pfc Thomas H. Conn 38434696 647

VHF RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/3 Francis S. Brownell 11039851 951

VHF RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Bernard (NMI) Kastner 35220090 951
T/5 Simon H. Snider 38329725 951

RADAR REPAIRMEN
T/5 Robert J. Martin 46245300 955
Cpl John S. Serick 32730107 955
T/5 William C. Finley 38318823 955
T/5 Richard C. Matthews 13150898 955
T/5 Frederick A. Hofmann 13159542 955

6. An innovation in supply and repair procedure for Team "A" was initiated this month with the setting up of a pool of new planes by the Service Group. These newly arrived planes must be put in condition and maintained until required by the Bomb Group. The Radio Repair Section of this team had a busy month. In addition to giving pre-flight checks to the planes that arrived for the pool they salvaged six planes, and in a ten day period they handled 109 pieces of equipment, 79 were cleared and checked and 3 were repaired. To check a Compass that was giving trouble T/Sgt Gregosian and T/5 Craig went on a practice bombing mission which took them out over the channel waters. They checked their equipment during the flight and had the pleasure of watching the practice bombs being released. T/4 Taylor was sent to GEE equipment school at Stanstead, and T/5 Worm departed for GEE school in Lincolnshire at the end of the month. Plans were started for link-radio trainer mock set ups and installation of radio equipment in the ambulance used by the station for crash landings.

7. The Radio Repair Section of Team "B" also had an increased amount of work for the month. On one day eleven SC8-522 VHF sets came in damaged from the squadrons and were all put in good shape before the day was over. Such on influx of work necessitates working till late at night quite often, but deadlines are all met, and this busy routine has not dampened interest of off-schedule experiments in the shop, particularly by Cpl John S. "Frank Sinatra" Serick who has a very complete stock of equipment and parts purchased locally with which to experiment. Aided and abetted by T/5 "Pappy" Snider, who has constructed his own VHF transceiver, Cpl Serick is exploring the mysteries of electronics. T/5 Matthews went to GEE school at Stanstead for two weeks, and T/5 Finley left for a three week course in GEE equipment in Lincolnshire. The Warehouse section has just completed twenty boxes to be used to carry their thirty-day level of supplies. Sgt Loop, who had remained with the Team to be in charge of telephone operations, was transferred out of the Company. Pvt Novack, who was acting as clerk in the orderly room, was also transferred, and T/5 Hofmann is acting in that capacity.

8. The extra-curricular activity of the 1052nd for the month offers many colorful sidelights. Outstanding were the well provided Company party which turned out, to be a beer-bust with the usual ramifications; the noticeably increased number of drunks and great lovers; and the growing number of casualties on missions to the local pubs, all of which seem to be SOP now. "And after mothering my boys for two years", said the First Sergeant despairing of such conduct. To date Wild Bob Martin still holds the record for the greatest number of flats on any one mission, and on a non-operational mission, T/5 Hynovitz came up with a neat pancake landing in a ditch.

9. The conclusion to last month's installment of the Unit History expressed the hope of long standing in the Company that additional personnel and equipment needed to accomplish our mission be authorized, so the big news of the month was the announcement by higher headquarters that a new T/O is to be in effect soon. It is hoped that this much needed assistance my reach us in time that full advantage may be taken of it in our coming job.

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1643 ###]

AUTH: CO Sta 166
DATE: 7 July 1944
INITIALS:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE GROUP

APO 149, US Army 7 July 1944

In reply refer to: 300.6

SUBJECT: Installments of Unit Histories. TO: Commanding General, Ninth Air Force Service Command, APO 149, US Army.

Transmitted herewith in compliance with par 5, Memo 20-10, IX AFSC, 5 Feb 1944, installments of unit histories for organizations this group are forwarded for your information.

PAUL J. WEXLER
1st Lt., A. C., Gp Hist O.

Incls: Unit Histories.

[Abridged]

FRANK E. ROBINS, JR.,
Captain, Air Corps,
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1645 ###]

Auth: Memo 20-10 IX AFSC
Date: 1 July 1944
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP
APO 149 US ARMY

30 June 1944

SUBJECT: Monthly Installment of Unit History

To: Group Historical Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with memorandum, Hqs, IX Air Force Service Command, No. 20-10, dated 5 February 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 28 Officers and 127 Enlisted Men.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. A short narrative of the part played in the war by this organization.

a. As invasion day drew near members of the squadron worked with one eye scanning the countless publications and warily watched the sky and listened for omens of the long awaited day with the others. With knowing looks we watched as countless heavy bombers roared overhead, and as ships from our station queued up over head awaiting their turn to land, office doors swung open as our personnel poured outside to count them in. Prophesies, predictions and rumors flew thick and fast with each passing day, but in spite of all the watchful waiting D-Day and H-Hour came during the early hours in the morning and it wasn't until the reassuring voice of GENERAL EISENHOWER came over the radio with the news of the invasion, was the Headquarters Squadron able to return to normal. In spite of the fact that the squadron had no physical part to play in the invasion, the countless hours spent in supplying our tactical units, checking forms, and sending trucks to widely scattered depots in search of needed supplies, our part is the gigantic plan became evident as mission after mission went off without a hitch. The personnel of the Squadron were elated to hear in the form of a TWX of our efforts to "KEEP THEM FLYING" had not gone unnoticed as the Commanding General of the IX Air Force and our own Subordinate Headquarters relayed their words of thanks to all our personnel for their behind the scene activities.

b. One of our best known officers was transferred to Higher Headquarters as our S-2 Officer, Major Thomas Barton left for 1st AADA, in the capacity of area Provost Marshall.

c. In as much as our activities, to most of us, have little bearing on the Actual Combat Functions hardly anything of outstanding news or Historical Value ever happens, which makes the recording of our activities rather a trying venture. Plans are now being formulated to celebrate our first year in the ETO with a Squadron Party which with be recorded in our next installment.

3. This unit is at the present time stationed at AAF Station #166, with Team "A" of the 53rd Service Group. The Finance Section and Seven (7) enlisted men of this unit are at Station #162 with Team "B" of the 53rd Service Group.

WALTER N. ARMBRUSTER,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1647 ###]

Auth: CO, 53rd Serv Gp
Date: 5 July 1944
Initials:

1176TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY, SERVICE GP (AVN)
APO 149, US Army.

5 July 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History

To: Group Historian, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. The following is a subsequent installment of the Unit History of this organization for the month of June 1944.

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: (As of 30 June 1944) 2 Officers 39 EM

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. Unit Narrative:

At present this unit is ??? of its various units, the task assigned them. These include the requisitioning, receiving, storage, and issue of ?? clothing and equipment, gasoline and oil, and the laundry, dry cleaning, shoe repair, and salvage service, necessary at this station.

Recreational activities include softball and volleyball games, and participation in, the attending of current stage presentations.

Thirty six (36) EM of this organization have been awarded the Good Conduct Medal.

DANIEL W. MAHONEY
1st Lieut., QMC
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1648 ###]

AUTH: CO Sta 162
Date: 5 July 1944
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE SQUADRON
Office of the Commanding Officer

APO 149, US Army 5 July 1944

In reply refer to: 300.6

SUBJECT: Unit History

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with letter, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army, dated 23 January 1944, subject, Unit Histories, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: None.

b. Strength: O-7, WO-1, EM-222.

c. Movement: None.

d. Casualties: None.

e. Decorations: None.

2. Organization reorganized 1 July 1944 in accordance with GO #94, IX AFSC, dated 27 June 1944 and T/O & E 1-417, dated 2 January 1944.

3. Organization performing 3rd Echelon Maintenance on B26s for the 387th Bombardment Group (M).

4. Work performed by the Engineering Section during the month of June; twenty (20) B-26 aircraft worked on and completed, two-hundred (200) work orders completed by the various shops.

Service Team "B" Mess organized 26 June 1944. Eight (8) organizations attached to the 53rd Service Squadron for rations only. Parts one, two and three of the ration column on the Morning Report computed daily.

1st Lt. Pernick and Pfc. Shirley, Dental Corps personnel, attached to Service Team "B" for dental work. Departed 3 July 1944 after two (2) months duty.

Personnel strength according to number compared with a month ago; no change in assigned officers, less one (1) attached officer. Gain of three (3) assigned enlisted men and less one (1) attached enlisted man.

IRWIN L. UNGERLEIDER
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1649 ###]

AUTH: CO IX AF
Date: 11 July 1944
Initials:

873RD CHEMICAL COMPANY, AIR OPERATIONS (H or M) AAF STATION 166

10 July 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army THRU: Headquarters, "Team A" 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. The following record of History of this organization for the month of June 1944 is submitted per Memo 20-10, IX AFSC, dated 5 Feb 1944.

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: Strength of this organization at end of the month is four (4) Officers, and one hundred and twenty seven (127) enlisted men.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. The organization performed usual camp duties for the month of June, which consist of the following:

a. Regular inspections to determine any discrepancies in the organization

b. Storing, handling, and shipping of Chemical Ammunition.

c. Testing and handling of leaking Mustard Bombs.

d. Assisted in the loading of planes to perform missions.

3. There were no maps, no photographs, nor any secret documents that could be sent in as history of the organization.

4. There were no company parties or activities of any kind during the month of June.

JOHN J. O'HARA
Capt., CWS
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1650 ###]

Auth: CO, Sta 166
Date: July 4, 1944
Initials:

COMPANY HISTORY of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn) June 1, 1944, to June 30, 1944

Organization: Negative.

Strength: As of June 30, 1944, the strength of the organization was four Officers and seventy-three Enlisted Men.

Movement: Negative.

Casualties: Negative.

Decorations: Eight EM were awarded the Good Conduct Medal during the month of June, 1944. (General Order Number 8, Hq, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, dtd 3 June 1944)

This organization participated in the celebration held on this station commemorating the successful completion of 100 missions by the Bomb Group. Each man took pride in the fine record of the Bomb Group knowing his work contributed in no small way to the achievement of that record, knowing that he is am integral cog in the machine that had blasted enemy strong points one-hundred times since becoming operational.

This 100-mission celebration was, of course, am anti-climax to D-Day. That day attested to the efficacy of the tactical bombing as performed by medium bombers of the Ninth Air Force


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1651 ###]

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE GROUP

APO 149, US Army 3 June 1944

GENERAL ORDERS )
NUMBER 8 )

EXTRACT

1. Under the provisions of AR 600—68, 4 May 1943, and Memorandum No 35-18, Hq, Ninth Air Force, dtd 20 Dec 1943, the GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL is awarded to the following named personnel.

Each of the following named individuals, orgns as indicated, has during the past twelve months, demonstrated his fidelity through faithful and exact performance of duty, and efficiency through capacity to produce desired results, while the behavior of each has been such as to deserve emulation.

1589th Ord S & M Co (Avn)

S/Sgt Robert A. Kimball (821) 17157435
S/Sgt Thomas J. Lynch (405) 31118823
Pfc George J. King (521) 35455460
Pfc Tomas T. Moncada (901) 38440467
Pfc Edward J. Spaulding (201) 33475742
Pvt Oral D. Graves (901) 39257008
Pvt John W. Sands Jr. (521) 34546299
Pvt George Tatar (965) 32884239

By order of Lieutenant Colonel CALDWELL:

FRANK E. ROBINS, JR.,
Captain, Air Corps,
Adjutant.

CERTIFIED A TRUE EXTRACT COPY:

O. M. REMER
1st Lt, Ord Dept
Commanding 1589th Ord S&M Co (Avn


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1652 ###]

Auth: CO, AAF Sta162
Date: 4 July 44
Initials: ???

1812th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co. (Avn)
Office of the Company Commander
53rd Service Group
APO 149, US Army

4 July 1944

Subject: Unit History.

To: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. Thru: Commanding Officer, Service Team "B", 53rd Service Group.

1. In compliance with Paragraph 3, letter Hq 53rd Service Group, dated 23 January 1944, Subject "Unit Histories", the following report is submitted:

A. Organization: Negative.

B. Strength: 30 June 1944: 75 EM, 4 Officers.

C. Date of arrival or departure of Station: Negative.

E. Awards to & Decorations of members: Negative.

2. The long awaited "D" day arrived 6 June 1944. It has speeded up the tempo of our work considerably but with these added hurdles came also increased enthusiasm and greater hope for the successful culmination of this war in the ETO. The news of the actual invasion came over the Tannoy system early in the morning but almost everyone had a feeling that big things were pending before the actual announcement. All men were restricted from 1200 hours, 5 June 1944. The invasion brought about a feeling of great relief, of added seriousness, and of sober confidence, rather than a feeling of hilarious excitement. It has meant greater responsibility and more work but the men feel sorely repaid for their efforts by the satisfactory success and progress to date. The weather has been very poor throughout the entire month and has seriously hampered the operation of both the tactical units and the service units.

A. Lt. LLEWELLYN C. NUTTALL joined the organization the early part of the month and was assigned to duty as Ammunition Officer. His ability, initiative, and good fellowship were more than enough to enable his section to successfully cope with what has been the toughest thirty day period encountered in its operation thus far. So great was the supply of bombs and allied material that it has been necessary for us to call upon the entire company to assist. In addition, the Chemical Company assisted to the extent of five or six men daily. To all the men of this section great credit must be given for their mountainous accomplishment and great credit must also be given to the rest of the men in the company who so willingly pitched in at night to help this section - all in addition to their other duties.

B. Combined operations between the Automotive and Supply Sections again accounted for a new low in the deadline vehicles this last month. To accomplish this success necessitated overtime work and more then a normal amount of initiative and ingenuity on both the part of the officer and enlisted men.

C. The Armament section again conducted its routine inspections of small arms on the base and pronounced improvement was noted in the condition of the weapons on the field.

3. The following men attended schools or went on special service for purpose of instruction during the month.

a. T/5 Harry D. Bartlett and Pfc Richard A. Richard completed one week Vehicle Waterproofing school.

b. Pfc Harold R. Crosby is attending a six week Welding School.

c. T/6 Thomas E. Page is on detached service as instructor in water-proofing vehicles.

T/5 Martin Laurel and Pvt John B. White completed a one week course in Bomb Reconnaissance.

e. Pfc William Schaffer is attending a two week Ammunition (Amn) course.

MICHAEL B. HEINDL
Capt., Ord Dept.,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1654 ###]

Auth: CG 9th AAF
Init:
Date: 5th July 1944

HEADQUARTERS 2198TH QUARTERMASTER TRUCK COMPANY AVN 53rd SERVICE GP
APO 149, US ARMY

5th July 1944

UNIT HISTORY, for Month of June 1944:

1. ORGANIZATION: Negative.

2. STRENGTH: 4 Officers, 94 Enlisted Man.

3. MOVEMENT: Negative.

4. CASUALTIES: Negative.

5. DECORATIONS: Negative.

6. During month of June unit continued to operate and perform duties of a Quartermaster Truck Company attached to Service Teams of a Service Group. The vehicles hauled bombs, rations, sir craft parts, personnel, and assisted in various duties peculiar to motor vehicles in the operation of an AAF Station. For the six month period ending the 30th June 1944 the vehicles of this organization have made a total mileage of 326,840 miles.

PAUL S. GLICK
1st Lieut., QMC
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1655 ###]

Auth: CG 9AF
Date: 4 Jan 44
Init:

87th Service Squadron

5 July 1944.

SUBJECT: Squadron History (Installment VI, 30 June 1944)

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with Letter, Hq, 53rd Service Group, Subject: Unit History, 23rd January 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 7 Officers, 2 Warrant Officer, 223 Enlisted Men

c. Arrived AAF Station 173, Dunkeswell, near Honiton, Devon, 28 July 1943. Departed AAF Station 173 and arrived at AAF Station 162, Chipping Ongar, Essex, 13 November 1943. Departed AAF Station 162, 27 December 1943 and arrived at AAF Station 166, Matching Green, Essex, 27 December 1943.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations and Awards: Negative.

2. The month of June 1944 saw D-Day come and go. For the troops on the "in" it was a day fraught with peril, death and fear. They had no time to let their minds dwell in the glory of their deeds on that memorable day. It was for history to tell their story. For the air crews it meant more sorties of enemy territory and in the battlefront. What they were going through, they had gone through before. Their deeds were great on that day. For the crews servicing the ships it meant ceaseless day and night work to keep the planes where it would do the most good. Contrary to expectations, the loss and damage was slight. After the initial excitement and effort business again became routine.

3. The 87th Service Squadron commemorated the invasion by spending its entire squadron fund on a party that will long be remembered, with music, dancing, drinking and eating. There was little to be desired. The success of the party was due to the efforts of Lt. Wexler, Special Service Officer of the Group, T/Sgt Naidus, S/Sgt McKnight, Sgt Radford, Sgt Bennett, Cpl Chase, Cpl O'Neal and Cpl Watson who spent many hours in preparing the refreshments and serving while the party was in progress. Sgt Davies and Sgt Konikson deserves a vote of thanks for their efforts towards decoration; Captain Gover, the Commanding Officer, and Lt. Hawkins, Adjutant, for making the party possible.

WESLEY P. GOVER,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1657 ###]

Auth: OG Ninth AF
Initials: 5 July 1944

40TH MOBILE R & R SQUADRON AAF Station 166

APO 149 US Army 5 July 1944

314-7

Unit History, June 1944

1. Organization: Negative.

2. Strength: a. Officers: 7

b. F/Officers: 1

c. Enlisted Men 169

3. Movement: Negative.

4. Casualties: Negative.

5. Decorations: Negative.

During the first week in June, Captain John R. Cogle, squadron Commander was confined to Station Sick Quarters for five days. In his absence, 1st Lt James Hysler, Jr assumed command.

Twenty men received the good news of promotions. They included two Tech Sgts, 1 S Sgt, 4 Sgts, 10 Cpls and 3 Pfcs. In as much as many ratings are still available each man is aware that promotion depends upon him.

General Order No 8, 53rd Service Group awarded 64 men the Good Conduct award for faithful and exact performance of duty during the past year both in this Squadron and organization from which they came.

The long hours of preparation during the past month in getting and keeping as many planes available for duty was rewarded on D-Day. It was then that the men realized that they are an important part of the giantic team,

The equipment is keeping pace with the increased strength of the squadron. It won't be too long before maximum effectiveness will be reached.

Four mobile units wore pressed into service on five off base jobs. Planes were forced down at Friston, Manston, Lancashire and Ramsgate.

The "on the job training" of sheet metal students has proved successful. All the men have been re-classified as Airplane Sheet Metal Workers.

As per regulation the entire organization heard the re-reading of the AW's.

Plans are being made to hold a squadron party in one of the near by towns. Committees have been formed and the affair is looked forward to.

JAMES H. HYSLER, Jr
1st Lt., AC
Security Office


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1661 ###]

Auth: Serv Gp CO
Date: 30 June 44
Init:

1052nd Signal Company (SG)
53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 30 June 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. (ATTN: Group Historian)

1. Following is the June installment of the Unit History of this organization. Changes were as follows:

a. Organization: Orders which transferred Private Morris Novack from the Company to the 53rd service Squadron were canceled, and Private Novack is back in the organization. The newest member of the Company is T/5 Norbert E. Lisowski, 39274163, (239), who was transferred on Special Orders No. 149 of the 12th Replacement Control Depot, Avn., dated 31 May 1944. Pvt Jimmie A. Holland, 38274603, (060), was transferred from the Company on Special Orders No. 105, dated 9 June 1944; Pvt Nathan M. Matz, 11113682, (951), and Pvt Thomas J. Quirk, Jr., 11053211, (667), were transferred on Special Orders 106, dated 11 June 1944; and Pvt George W. King, 7025405, (237), was transferred on Special Orders No. 115, dated 22 June 1944, all orders of Headquarters, 53rd Service Group.

b. Strength: The Company is now four men under normal strength.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. In the early morning hours of June 6th the order reached our Message Center that D-Day procedure was in effect; the day for which the Allied Forces had been so long preparing and the whole world had been so long and anxiously awaiting had come. On the previous afternoon every available hand had been put to the task of painting the black and white stripes on our planes that would designate them as the air arm of invasion. In the evening the combat crews had been briefed in the strictest secrecy to which even the intelligence staff had not been admitted. The Company awoke in the morning to the roar of a constant stream of air traffic unaware of what was taking place one hundred and fifty miles away; everyone soon heard that radio Berlin had announced Allied landings in France; but it was not until we heard the resonant and reassuring voice of our supreme Commander, General Eisenhower, were we sure. That morning we gravely attacked tasks which had taken on a new significance.

3. No sooner had we become accustomed to the new order of battle when Hitler released the secret weapon he promised his people would end forever resistance in England. This weapon was first tried on the night of June 13-14 which became the occasion of the first air raid in London in some seven weeks. Several members of the Company were in London that evening together, and a plane came roaring over our vehicle shooting flame and flying at a very low altitude. The search lights and flak-bursts followed it across the sky, but suddenly the motor stopped and the plane crashed with a terrific explosion a few blocks away. Later we learned that this strange plane which sounded not unlike a one cylinder motor was a "flying bomb", a "pilotless expendable aircraft" by GI nomenclature. To us they became "doodle-bugs", and about one hundred a night came over England for the balance of the month causing alerts lasting practically all night. We soon learned that when the roaring of the motor stopped the bomb would land in about three seconds. On one occasion one landed mid-way between our two stations, causing considerable damage and disturbing the sleep of the 1052nd. On another occasion Sgt Kampert became a near casualty when in diving for a fox hole he broke one of his toes.

4. Tuesday the 20th of the month was the occasion of a big celebration at Station 166 to the tune of free beer, speeches, and entertainment. On this day the 391st Bomb Group (M) completed its 100th mission after less than five months of operations. There were gay festivities, highlighted by the Chaplain, CAPTAIN M. J. MOORE, being presented with the decoration of the "Order of Rationed Passion".

5. One of the newer members of the Organization, Private Aaron Kraft, has become an expert in the installation of radio equipment in the Crew Trainer which is an improvement on the Link Trainer. The original Link Celestial Navigation Trainer was designed to acquaint pilots with navigational instruments. The idea was conceived to include radio equipment in the trainer, so now the whole crew can participate, and a whole mission can be simulated with amazing realism. Private Kraft helped build the first model at station 162, the second at 166, and was in charge of construction of the third at Station 161. So excellent is the reputation he has made for himself he is frequently called for by Bomber Command and is to leave on DS again next month to build his fourth Crew Trainer at station 168.

6. This month several of the section leaders made visits to Signal Companies in the near vicinity in the hope of gaining some new ideas to improve our installations and our service to the Bomb Groups, but it was the consensus of opinion of the men that our setup is far superior to anything they saw. In fact it thought that only one Companies' installations compared favorably with ours.

7. On Sunday the 11th a triangular track meet was held at Station 166 between Stations 166, 169, and 161. T/4 Tom Brennan again distinguished himself by placing first in the discus and third in the shot put. Up until his last throw in the discus Sgt Brennan was in third place. The writer came on the field just as our champion made his final throw which went a good ten feet beyond his nearest opponent, a very thrilling sight to see. On the 21st Sgt Brennan competed in the Ninth Air Force meet and though not in such good form was second in the discus and will compete next month in the USSTAF meet.

COMPANY COMMANDER:
CAPTAIN WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR. O-469001 0210

FIRST SERGEANT:
F/Sgt Robert (NMI) Gray 35262884 502

ADM & TECH CLERK:
S/Sgt Merhl W. Sulcer 33371646 275

SUPPLY SERGEANTS:
Sgt Jerome V. Lundblad 39280944 405
Sgt Laurel C. Howard 39831883 821

SUPPLY CLERKS:
T/5 Peter Slata 33362208 766
Pvt Aven B. Moody 18125096 650

MOTOR TRANS NCO:
S/Sgt John J. Corsall, Jr. 12067069 014

AUTOMOBILE MECH:
T/5 Laverne J. Tiedeman 36246651 014

CLERK TYPIST:
T/4 John M. McCarty 31062428 405
T/4 Byrne W. Pike 39844307 955

ARMORER:
T/5 Anton Klein 37287074 511

COOK:
T/4 Ciro M. Montuori 12191777 060
T/5 Fred Bedross 32872058 060

COOK'S HELPER:
Pfc Lemoine C. Shaw 16024418 060

BASE DEFENSE:
Pvt Tom D. Olin 36735567 647

a. Only one Company meeting was held during the month at which the latest directives and plans and prospects for the future were discussed, a lecture on Army Orientation was given, and the last month's installment of the Unit History was read. At Station 166 the review of the school of the soldier was completed early in the month, and three classes in Chemical Warfare training were conducted by the Unit Gas Noncoms. Group S-3 initiated a school attended by all drivers in the Company and personnel of the 2198th QM Truck Company served as instructors. Drivers' school was also held for Team B at Station 162, and Base Defense school was continued with T/5 Roberts attending.

b. In the Company Supply Section T/5 Howard was promoted to sergeant, so he and Sgt Lundblad are now the joint executives in that department. Sgt Corsall, Chief of the Motor Section was promoted to Staff Sergeant. With the transfer of Pvt Holland Shaw was switched from the Motor Pool to the night shift in the kitchen, and our deserts have undergone considerable improvement this month as the result of Shaw's expert cooking.

OPERATIONS SECTIONS

WIRE CHIEF
T/Sgt Jarvis J. Phillips 16043194 950

ASST WIRE CHIEF
S/Sgt John (NMI) Fischer 37471453 261

LINEMEN
T/4 Thomas J. Brennan 33712143 950
T/5 William W. Pinkerous 32240257 238
T/5 Robert A. Phelps 37493604 950
Pfc Leland (NMI) Johnson 37285804 950
Pfc Ormal P. Goodell 36554706 950
Pfc Calvin C. Hornbeck 15075230 238
Pfc Willie D. Risher 14099839 238
Pfc Will T. Shiflet 38413103 238

TELETYPE MECHANIC
T/4 Stanley A. Szoda 32241294 239

MESSAGE CENTER CHIEF
S/Sgt Raymond (NMI) Perry 34178024 667

ASST MESSAGE CENTER CHIEFS
Sgt Florience R. Dicke, Jr 35336466 667
Sgt Floyd H. VanGuilder 31114163 667

MESSAGE CENTER CLERKS
T/5 Edward J. Doyle 11088302 667
T/5 Meyer S. Finkelstein 12082078 667
Pvt Samuel (NMI) Ben 12096566 667
Pvt Kenneth H. Lincoln 12207730 667

MOTOR MESSENGERS
Pfc Willard M. Austin 12066999 590
Pfc James L. Drinnen 34186258 590

CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
T/Sgt Anthony J. Laraia 31045818 766

ASST CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
S/Sgt Robert G. Kampert 13152313 766

RADIO OPERATORS
T/4 Frank J. Squadrito 13098795 766
T/4 William F. Finn 31098430 766
T/5 Clifford S. Jelliff 12098430 766
T/5 Leland (NMI) Montgomery 15104546 766
T/5 Robert H. Paul 33247036 405
Pfc Edward J. P. Murphy 11115777 766
Pfc Edward A. Olsen 12095760 766
Pvt Clarence C. Rankin, Jr 33301555 766

TELEPHONE OPERATORS
T/5 Cecil P. Huff 34186357 650
T/5 Norbert A. Lisowski 39274163 239
Pfc Charles L. Coley 36718896 650
Pfc Donald I. McCoy 16101404 650
Pfc Ernest F. Colbath 31114167 650
Pfc Robert J. Higgins 12059069 239
Pvt Walter J. Stilley 34147463 650

CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
S/Sgt Harold M. Bauer 37115135 237

ASST CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
Sgt Warren S. Parsons 34537736 237

TELETYPE OPERATORS
T/5 Ben T. Ware, Jr 34597673 237
Pfc Richard E. Otis 36479127 237
Pfc Howard F. Fischer 35684695 237

a. The mobile radio operations trailer which was mentioned in last month's installment was photographed, and pictures together with a description and circuit diagram were sent to higher headquarters. Copies are appended to this history. The trailer was inspected by MAJOR IRA F. STINSON, the Signal Officer at our next higher administrative headquarters, 1st Advanced Air Depot Area, and by MAJOR C. C. TURNER, Signal Officer at our Tactical Air Depot. They were very impressed by the work done and the ingenuity and planning displayed in this installation. The Radio Operators came up at the beginning of the month with what looked like a nifty invasion mascot for the Company in a goat by the name of "Mersey Doats" complete with a blanket with "1052" stenciled on it. But it seems she broke too many house rules and had to be sold to the garbage man for ten shillings. When last seen she was riding away in the garbage truck looking apparently undismayed by her loss of rank and prestige.

b. MAJOR STINSON and MAJOR TURNER were particularly impressed by the main frame just completed by our Assistant Wire Chief, S/Sgt Fischer. Sgt Fischer's system for increasing the mobility of our telephone system has already been described in a previous installment of this History, and pictures, diagram, and description are appended to this installment. The Majors thought this work showed a very commendable skill and ingenuity and that the idea had a very definate usefulness in our type of mobile installation. They requested pictures, diagram, and description, that copies may be disseminated throughout the command.

c. T/5 Finkelstein of the Message Center came through in traditional style of the 1052nd by getting the second highest grade of his class in a school of British codes and ciphers at Oxford, Oxfordshire. Promotions in the Operations Section for the month were given to Bobby Phelps and Ben Ware who both made T/5. The Message Center personnel and other Section Leaders were given a chance to fire the pistol. Sgt Brennan and Pfc Risher of the Wire Section were sent to .50 cal. machine gun school in Northern Ireland as the weapon is mounted on their wire truck.

SUPPLY AND REPAIR TEAMS

TEAM A
TEAM COMMANDER
2nd Lt William W. Pashwa O-1645273 500

#SUPPLY
WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
S/Sgt John J. Costello 12034091 851

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/5 Reece B. Drinnen 34186188 835

WAREHOUSEMEN
Cpl Cecil C. Summers 18039762 405
Pvt Joseph J. McFadden 31161569 835

#RADIO MAINTENANCE
RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/Sgt Vaughn W. Gagosian 31355338 647

ASST RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Donnis E. Taylor 34395374 955

AIRBORNE RADIO CHIEF
Sgt William W. Casey 36171752 647

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 William W. Craig 35800677 647
Cpl Raymond N. Blair 33553738 647
Pvt Aaron K. Kraft 16097032 647

VHF RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
Sgt Joseph C. Bleiler 31090438 951

VHF RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Edward E. Sheerer 33508965 951
T/5 Tolbert J. Neibich 33506232

RADAR REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 George C. Lewis 39324364 955

RADAR REPAIRMEN
T/5 Richard M. Ramsbey 35541621 955
T/5 Herbert F. Worm 36243563 955
Cpl George M. Parker, Jr 16085397 955
T/5 Finley M. Gleason, Jr 39024227 955
Pvt Morris Novack 33786735 955

TEAM B
TEAM COMMANDER
1st Lt John M. Casson O-1643738 4400

#SUPPLY
WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/Sgt Frank A. Swider 33135179 581

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
Sgt Lawrence A. Brennan 12056692 821

WAREHOUSEMEN
T/5 Henry L. Pratt, Jr 38410858 835
T/5 John W. Depew 34186223 835

#RADIO MAINTENANCE
RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
M/Sgt Malcolm D. Raines 34231859 955

ASST RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/3 Francis S. Brownell 11039851 951

AIRBORNE RADIO CHIEF
T/4 Bernard (NMI) Kastner 35220090 951

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Knowles R. Roberts 34820933 647
T/5 David S. Hymovitz 33054079 647
T/5 William E. Siebold 31354795 647

VHF RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Simon H. Snider 38329725 951

VHF RADIO REPAIRMEN
Pfc Thomas H. Conn 38434696 647

RADAR REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Robert J. Martin 46245300 955

RADAR REPAIRMEN
T/5 John S. Serick 32730107 955
T/5 William C. Finley 38318823 955
T/5 Richard C. Matthews 13150898 955
T/5 Frederick A. Hofmann 13159542 955

a. Shortly before D-Day some Forts and Libs were forced to land at our field because of bad weather, and VHF Chief Bleiler and Airborne Chief Casey of Team A had their first opportunity to explore and help repair a heavy bomber. Sgt Casey was sent to bomber maintenance school and T/5 Worm returned from GEE Equipment school this month. Sgt "One-Time" Taylor, assistant chief of the Radio Repair Section was promoted to technician third grade.

b. The Radio section has quite a photographic department now. A maze of equipment was purchased and salvaged from all quarters. Sgt Gagosian calls it the most complicated equipment ever devised for the development of films. One of the tricks worked out by the expert, T/5 Ramsbey, was the conversion of an obsolete 5 x 7 view camera into an enlarger. It is rigged up with five lights so that the exposure of various parts of the picture can be altered and improved. The mobile radio repair truck is the dark room, and the "photographic section" drives T/3 Taylor to distraction by running his batteries down and threatening to move out some of his radio test equipment so that they can have more room.

c. The month was spent in feverish activity by both supply teams to be ready for a possible move across the channel and in anticipation of increased requirements by the Bomb Group, but much to the surprise of all concerned the receiving and issuing of supplies has not noticeably increased since D-Day.

d. Team B had enjoyed the privilege of having a canteen in its back yard until last month when it was moved away. This caused considerable change in schedules and also vacated two buildings which were taken over by the two sections of the Team. The Radio section had been doing all its work in the mobile truck and now has considerably more space. The Section is continuing its excellent work under the supervision of "The Old Master", Sgt Rains, and in addition to routine work the boys found time to install a Special Service radio equipped with loud speakers in the Crew Briefing Room and Parachute Room. The Section proved its versatility when Sgt Brownell, answering an emergency call from the civilian electricians, climbed a pole that was too tall for the reach of their ladder and removed a dangerous live wire. Bernard Kastner was designated Airborne Chief, Simon Snider was designated VHF Chief, and Bob Martin was made Radar Chief, and each was promoted to technician fourth grade. With the advent of these promotions a debating team was formed to discuss forensically the subject, "Resolved Sergeants pull KP". The negative won, so only T/4s, T/5s, and privates are on the KP list.

e. The Company's newest arrival, T/5 Lisowski, was put on DS with the Team to help Pfc Coley and Pvt Stilley operate the switchboard and is doing an excellent job, thus relieving the boys considerably. Coley is doing the Team clerical work in addition to his regular duty on the switchboard.

f. LT CASSON is knocking himself out keeping things running smoothly and makes himself available to the men for questions or gripes every evening including Sunday from 2000 to 2230 hours - location, side room of Harry's Pub.

11. The mission of a Signal Company, Service Group, and the problems peculiar to its activities has never received space proportionate to that of the Ground Forces Signal Units in training directives, and this point was pointed out in a letter to Special Activities Branch of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer in Washington. A copy oi this letter and the answer concurring on this point are appended. This letter defines our mission as we understand it and also describes our policies of dissimination of training material and encouragement of originality and the desire for improvement. In view of results obtained and the recent inspection of other Signal Companies we believe our efforts have not been without avail.

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1668 ###]

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE GROUP

APO 149, US Army. 16 June 1944

SPECIAL ORDERS )
NUMBER 111 )

1. Pvt J. R. Zimmerman (345) 38089116, 2198th Qm Trk Co (Avn), WP Friston England, o/a this date on temp dy not to exceed two (2) days, for Engineering purposes. Upon compl of temp dy EM will return to proper orgn & sta. Reiubusscrent to EM while in travel status is atzd in accordance with Cir 63 Hq, ETOUSA, dtd 5 June 1944. TDN by MT, 60-136 P 432-02 A 212/40425.

2. UP of Ar 35-320, the fol named O are agtd Class "A" Agent Finance Officers for MAJOR GROVER C. FARMER, O479369, FD, for the purpose of paying regular and supplementary payrells, orgns indicated, for the month of Jun. 1944:

1ST LT ROBERT H. LICK, O5656991, AC, Hq & Hq Sq,
1ST LT GLENN R. DICKERSON, O474988, AC 53rd Serv Sq,
1ST LT THOMAS D. HAWKINS, O917650, AC, 57th Serv Sq,
CAPT MICHAEL D. HEINDL, O1574814, ORD, 1812th Ord S & M Co (Avn),
1ST LT OSWALD M. REMER, O1583553, ORD, 1589th Ord S & M Co (Avn),
1ST LT JAMES H. HYSLER, JR., O323708, AC, 40th Mob R & R Sq,
1ST LT ROBERT W. DOYLE, O568598, AC, Det "A", 40th Mob R & R Sq,
CAPT WILLIAM F. RIECK, O469001, Sig C, 1052nd Sig Co (SG),
1ST LT JOHN M. CASSON, O1643537, Sig C, Det "A", 1052nd Sig Co (SG),
1ST LT HAROLD P. JACOBS, O1581830, QMC, 1176th QM Co, Serv Gp (Avn),
1ST LT WALTER H. SCHULTTE, O1587606, QMC, Det "A", 1176th QM Co, Serv Gp (Avn),
CAPT JOHN J. O'HARA, O1036662, CWS, 873rd Chem Co (AO),
1ST LT OTIS W. NEAL, O10366650, CWS, Det "A", 873rd Chem Co (AO),
1ST LT PAUL S. GLICK, O1586608, QMC, 2198th QM Trk Co (Avn)

3. UP of AR 35-320, CAPT HAROLD H. DAVIS, O1036111, CWS, is aptd Class "A" Agent Finance Officer for MAJOR GROVER C. FARMER, O479369, FD, for the purpose of paying Officers Vouchers of Team "A", and Hq & Hq Sq, for the month of June 1944.

4. UP of AR 35-320, 1ST LT GLENN R. DICKERSON, O474988, AC, is aptd Class "A" Agent Finance Officer for MAJOR GROVER C. FARMER, O479369, FD, for the purpose of paying Officers Vouchers of Team "B" for the month of June 1944.

5. Fol named O & EM, orgns indicated, WP to IX AFSC Athletic O, 2 Dennan St, Rainbow Corner, London, o/a 15 June 44 on temp dy not to exceed four (4) days reporting thereat not later then 1600 hours 18 June 44 to participate in IX AFSC Track & Field Meet. Upon compl of temp dy O & EM will return to proper orgns & sta. Reinbursenent to O & EM while in travel status is atzd in accordence with Cir 63, Ha, ETOUSA, dtd 5 June 1944. TDN by MT, mil acft, or rail, 60-136 P 432-02 A 212/40425.

1ST LT PAUL J. WEXLER, O1593381, AC, Hq & Hq Sq
Tec 4 Thomas J. Brennan (950) 33172143, 1052nd Sig Co (SG)

6. T/Sgt Joseph C. Ludes (686) 33162695, 87th Serv Sq, WP Hans Crescent ARC, London, o/a 18 June 1944, on temp dy not to exceed two (2) days on physical training activitics. Upon compl of temp duty EM will return to proper orgn & sta. TDN by MT, mil acft, or rail, 60-136 P 432-02 A 212/40425.

7. UP of AR 615-5, 30 June 1943, and upon recommendation of the Orgn Commander, fol named EM, 1052nd Sig Co (SG), are reduced to grade of Private without pejudice.
Cpl Raymond Blair (647), 33553738
Cpl George M. Parker (955), 39034227
Cpl John S. Serick (955), 32730107

8. UP of AR 615-5, 30 June 1943, and upon recommendation of the Orgn Commander, fol named EM, 1052nd Sig Co (SG), are promoted to grade indicated:

TO STAFF SERGEANT (TEMP)
Tec 4 John J. Corsall Jr (014) 12067069

TO TECHNICIAN THIRD GRADE (TEMP)
TEC 4 Donnis E. Taylor (955) 34395374

TO SERGEANT (TEMP)
Tec 5 Laurel C. Howard (821) 39831883

TO TECHNICIAN FOURTH GRADE (TEMP)
Tec 5 Bernard (NMI) Kastner (951) 35220090
Tec 5 Robert J. Martin (955) 46245300
Tec 5 Simon H. Snider (951) 38329725

TO TECHNICIAN FIFTH GRADE (TEMP)
Pfc Robert A. Phelps (950) 37493604
Pvt Raymond N. Blair (647) 33553738
Pvt George M. Parker (955) 39034227
Pvt John S. Sarick (955) 32730107
Pvt Ben T. Ware Jr (237) 34597673

(Paragraphs directing travel are pursuant to auth contained in Ltr, Hq, ETOUSA, dtd 3 Nov 43. The alws in above order as those prescribed in Cir 63 Hq, ETOUSA, dtd 5 June 1944, and Policy No 30-1, Hq, USAAF, UK, dtd 9 Nov 43.


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1670 ###]

The mobile telephone centre main frame was built for the purpose of speeding up installation of telephone communications for a service group. It was constructed so that it could be used easily with either W-110-B Field wire or rubber covered cable, five or ten pair. It is constructed to accommodate three TO-12 Switchboards each consisting of 20 extensions and 4 trunks, a total of 72 lines, plus 16 repeat coils for phantom circuits.

The line side or outside part of the main frame has two vertical terminal strips numbered from one to 72. Attached to each terminal is a conductor from a five pair cable stud which is permanently attached to the terminals and to the base of the main frame and can be used at any time for a cable system. These same terminals are also equipped to be used for field wire.

The switchboard side of the main frame consists of three horizontal terminal strips each heaving thirty pairs of terminals attached to them. To these terminals, two ten pair cables are attached permanently to the first twenty pairs of terminals, and a plug is attached at the other end of the cables. This plug, salvaged from a crashed bomber, contains connections for twenty pairs of wires. The remaining ten pairs of terminals have attached to them another ten pair cable that also has a plug on the opposite end of it, but has only ten connections. The first twenty pairs are used for extensions only; the last ten pair are used for trunks, repeat coils in the switchboard, ground, cor. and ?? circuits, and telering. Each horizontal terminal strip contains enough terminals for one TC-12 Switchboard.

Also mounted to the switchboard is - Test set RE-65 with hand set connected to the test set for talking test, commercial power input receptical, telering, and a holder for line record cards. The test set is so mounted that any line may be tested without moving test set or removing any lines except the one under test. The ground test lead is permanently grounded to the frame. Test leads one and two are connected to the switchboard and used as wire chief's telephone when not being used for testing line.

The line and switchboard side of the frame are interconnected by jumper wire which runs through rings to keep them in neat and traceable manner. These jumpers can be easily changed when necessary.

Attached to the switchboard are two female recepticals that are used to connect the main frame to the switchboard. These female sockets are permanently attached to the switchboard and when the board is being packed for shipping, sockets will be stored away in the compartment with switchboard cords.

All rubber covered cable used by the army his a plug on each end that contains connections for five pairs of wires. The slugs on this cable will be plugged into the main frame at the base and taped to hold securely. The cable plug opposite the end attached to the main frame will plug into an outside terminal box. This terminal box can be either 5 or 10 pair as desired and is easily constructed.

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1672 ###]

DESCRIPTION OF MOBILE RADIO TRAILER

The greatest single problem in attaining mobility is the inadequate number of vehicles assigned to a Signal Company, Service Group. The Radio Operations Section was faced with the problem of picking two complete SCR-188's, totalling thirty-six hundred pounds, into just one one-ton trailer. It was decided test operations could be accomplished with the use of one complete set and the Warehouse and Company Supply Sections would carry the spare parts and supplies.

The sides of the trailer were built twelve inches higher than normal height in order to mount the transmitter above the rectifier. Chests were constructed to house the tuning units, BC-244 receiver, and BC-342 receiver. The tuning unit chest was mounted just along side the rectifier and is just large enough to hold the five spare tuning units. The front of the chest was hinged to form a table top when opened, thus giving us a suitable place for the typewriter when in operation. The chest for the BC-244 Receiver was mounted in a chest along side the tuning unit chest. This chest houses the rectifier and receiver. The BC-342 Receiver is mounted along side the BC-244 Receiver chest. This chest also serves as a desk and is the position that the set is operated from. There are other compartments in this chest. In the center just above the receiver a LS-3 Speaker is mounted. The other compartments are used for storing headsets, log and number sheets, spare tubes, etc. The lower section of this chest is equipped with slides used to house the typewriter when not in use. The frequency meter is mounted to the top of the BC-244 Receiver chest. Tool chests and spare parts chest for the remote control unit are used as seats.

All wiring is run beneath the trailer encased in tubing taken from salvaged planes. A wall outlet is mounted at the front of the trailer and all power lines lead to this outlet. Each piece of equipment is grounded to the trailer body. A keying relay is run from the BC-342 Receiver to the BC-191 Transmitter thus making it possible to operate from this position.

A six foot whip antenna is mounted on the left rear corner of the trailer and is attached to the BC-244 Receiver. At the right corner is mounted a fifteen foot whip antenna which is used for the transmitter and the BC-342 Receiver. A rack was constructed beneath the trailer to house the mast section and is easily accessable from the rear


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1674 ###]

1052nd Signal Company (SG)
53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 30 April 1944

SUBJECT: Suggestions for Signal Corps Information Letter. TO: Chief Signal Officer, Washington, D. C. (ATTN: Special Activities Branch)

1. The 1052nd Signal Company, Service Group, has been receiving Signal Corps Information letters for a period of two years, and much of the information contained in them has been put to excellent use, but there never has been included in the letters any information or items on the Signal Corps units which are serving with the Air Force. Theirs is a job composed of all the missions and problems of a ground force unit plus the missions and problems peculiar to the Air Force.

2. It has been a custom of this officer to pass these Information Letters from both Washington, D. C., and the European Theater of Operations around to all the sections of the Company so that the information and ideas portrayed in them can be out to use whenever possible. The subjects contained in these Letters under these conditions of striving for better maintenance and operation of Signal Corps units have proven invaluable during the existence of the Company. The letters give the power of self learning to all the men in the unit, and it makes them strive to better any suggestions or ideas put forth in them. The letter also enables the men to see pictures and read the accounts of communication personnel under combat conditions which they themselves might run into at a future date.

3. The missions of a Signal Company, Service Group, are composed of all types of work that any ground force unit might encounter. As it must be remembered one of the primary missions of the ground force is to secure a beachhead and effect a neutralization of the territory so that a landing strip may be secured for the use of aircraft of any type to give the proper ground support which is needed to further the advance of the ground troops. At this time a Signal Company, Service Group, or mobile detachments thereof, is called into action to service and maintain the air croup in its operations. As was shown in the African and Italian campaigns this work is done under the extreme combat conditions. The work performed includes the supply of the combat and service group with Signal items, both ground and airborne, and the third echelon repair and maintenance of all Signal equipment including airborne radar, radio, ground radio, telephone, teletype, and both airborne and ground VHF equipment. In addition a complete communication system composed of telephone, teletype, radio, and message center must be installed, operated, and maintained for the headquarters of the Service Group.

4. For the above reasons it is suggested that your Headquarters include in the Signal Corps letters information which will aid in the betterment of th


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1675 ###]

WAR DEPARTMENT ARMY SERVICE FORCES OFFICE OF THE COMMANDING OFFICER WASHINGTON

10 May 1944

Dear Captain Rieck:

Thank you for your letter of April 30th, and for the suggestions you make for the improvement of the Signal Corps Technical Information Letter.

Your remarks about the need fer more information regarding air equipment and the use of Signal equipment by the Air Forces also occurred to us and we are attempting to cover that subject every month. An article, entitled "Problems of High Altitude Communication," in two parts ran in the December 1943 and January 1944 issues of SCTIL. "Radio Set 624-?" ran in the April issue, and the May issue will contain two stories on the subject: "Speech Level for Interphon. Communications" and "VHF Fighter Control." Subsequent issues will include an article on "Wire Communications at an Air Base" in addition to other items on airborne and air-ground apparatus.

I was more then happy to hear of the use to which you put the Letter and the benefits you and your men derive from it. If anything makes us feel that we are doing some good here in Washington, it is learning that what we do is being used to advantage in the field.

Should you at any time have any ideas for an article, don't hesitate to put therm down on paper and send them in. We welcome contributions.

Yours very sincerley,

C. J. McIntyr. Lt. Col., Signal Corps, Chief, Special Activities Branch


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1683/4 ###]


1052 Sig Co - Radio Operations Trailer - 1 Ton Trailer.


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1685/6 ###]


1052 Sig Co - Radio Operations Trailer - 1 Ton Trailer.


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1687/8 ###]


1052 Sig Co - Mobile Telephone Main Frame.


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1689/90 ###]


1052 Sig Co - Mobile Telephone Main Frame.


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1692 ###]


53 Sv Gp Hq Sq - People / Party Photo


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1693 ###]


53 Sv Gp Hq Sq - People / Party Photo


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1694 ###]


53 Sv Gp Hq Sq - People / Party Photo


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1696 ###]

Auth: Memo 20-10 IX AFSC
Date: 4 August 1944
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP
APO 149 US ARMY

4 August 1944

SUBJECT: Monthly Installment of Unit History. TO: Group Historical Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, U. S. Army.

1. In compliance with memorandum, Hqs, IX Air Force Service Command, No. 20-10, dated 5 February 1944, the following information is submitted:

Organization: Organization reorganized under Change #3, dated 19 May 1944 to T/O 1-412, dated 16 June 1943.

Strength: 27 Officers and 135 Enlisted Men

Movement: Major Grover C. Farmer and (8) E/M Finance Section moved from AAF Station #162 to AAF Station #166. Captain Charles E. Bettinger - Group Material Officer, 1st Lt George W. Hoffman - Asst Group Finance Officer, 1st Lt Clyde H. Warren - Asst Group CWS Officer, 1st Lt Harry K. McGovern - Group Property Ordnance Officer (3) E/M CWS, (6) E/M Finance Section, (2) E/M Ordnance Section and (1) E/M, AC Special Service Clerk moved from AAF Station #162 to AAF Station #452.

Casualties: Negative.

Decorations: Negative.

A short narrative of the part played in the war by this organization.

a. On July 26th Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron completed one (1) year in the E.T.O. and decided to hold a squadron party to celebrate it's first anniversary. Being dept at playing the master of ceremonies, First Sergeant Cheatwood appointed a number of committees to arrange for a suitable place to hold the festivities, a dance band to provide the most in the way of music and refreshments to suit everybody's taste. July the 8th was selected as the date and the School Hall in Brentwood, Essex was made available through the kind co-operation of our English friends. Promtly at 2030 hours the GIs and their best girl friends arrived on the scene and proceeded to make merry. The scene itself was one of striking gaiety with multicolored streamers floating overhead as the party makers danced to the tunes, both hot and mellow, of the Station #162 band, drank beer and coca cola and munched delicious sandwiches. In an atmosphere of good fellowship, there was plenty of "story swapping" and "reminiscing" about all that has happened to us since landing on the shores of England, and one GI was heard to remark that "even home was never like this". Perhaps the most universal comment to be heard throughout the evening - and the best tribute to the success of the affair itself - was the oft repeated remark that "this is the best squadron party we've ever had". Among the Officers present were Colonel Freeman T. Caldwell, Group Commander, Lt Colonel Harry D. Stone, Group Executive Officer, Captain Walter N. Armbruster, Squadron Commander, Captain Rocco L. Pompa, Group Dental Officer, Captain James L. Tucker, Group S-3 Officer and 1st Lt Charles Le McQuillan, Group Transportation Officer, all of whom appeared to be having as much fun as the enlisted men. Our thanks go out to all those who helped to provide such a "swell time" and we express our particular appreciation to the men who arranged for all the facilities needed including such refinements as polishing glass-ware to be used by the lady guests. We close our comment on the first squadron party held in the E.T.O. by repeating the question which all of the boys are asking, "When's the next Party ?"

b. Major Horace A. Cannon, one of our best known Officer was transferred to the 12th Replacement Control Depot, rho will await Water Transportation to the Zone of Interior, under the provisions of RPO Project.

c. The Squadron baseball team continues to be the best "six inning" team in the league and are considering having the rules amended so that all games will end after the sixth inning. What has happened to them from the seventh inning on is better left unsaid and unsung. But, lest it be said that we can't take it, here's the record. Of the eight games played, the squadron won two (2) and lost six (6) (five (5) of which "went with the wind" after the sixth time at bat).

d. With D-Day safely launched all eyes feverishly scan each day's news bulletins and papers, all ears are glued to the radio for "last minute" announcements (Doodle Bugs permitting) and all hands "stick" at their appointed tasks hoping that our unspectacular efforts are in some measure helping to make the going a little smoother for the boys across the Channel.

3. This unit is at the present time stationed at AAF Station #166, with Team "A" of the 53rd Service Group. Four (4) Officers and twelve (12) enlisted men of this unit are et AAF Station #452 with Team "B" of the 53rd Servic. Group.

WALTER N. ARMBRUSTER,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding.

Incl: 3 Pictures taken at Squadron Party


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1698 ###]

Auth: CO Sta 452
Date: 4 August 1944
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE SQUADRON
Office of the Commanding Officer

APO 149 US ARMY 4 August 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History. TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with letter, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army, dated 23 January 1944, subject, Unit Histories, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Organization reorganized 1 July 1944 in accordance with GO No. 94, IX AFSC, dated 27 June 1944 and T/O & E 1-417, dated 2 January 1944.

b. Strength: O-8, WO-1, EM-224.

c. Movement: Organization transferred from AAF Station 162 (Chipping Ongar) to AAF Station 452 (Stony Cross) on 21 July 1944 in accordance with letter, Headquarters, IX AFSC, APO 149, US Army, dated 11 July 1944, file number 370.5, subject, Movement of Troops.

d. Casualties: None.

e. Decorations: Sixty-one (61) enlisted men of this organization were awarded the Good Conduct Medal in accordance with paragraph 1 of GO No. 9, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army, dated 11 July 1944.

2. General information about the different sections of the squadron:

a. Squadron Headquarters: A unit personnel has been organized for the purpose of handling all of the personnel work in the team. Two (2) enlisted men of Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, 53rd Service Group, who have been put on temporary duty with this headquarters, are assisting in this sections.

b. Squadron Mess:

(1) Enlisted Men's Mess: Upon arrival at this station the Enlisted Men's Mess was reorganized. Officers and organizations, other than those in the team, have discontinued messing in the Enlisted Men's Mess Hall.

(2) Officers' Mess and Club: Officers' Mess and Club was organized upon arrival at this station for the officers in the team and the officers in the Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron of the 387th Bombardment Group (M).

c. Air Corps Supply: Air Corps Supply obtains its supplies direct from the 2d Tactical Air Depot Detachment located on this station.

d. Engineering: Engineering Section is performing 3rd Echelon Maintenance on B26s for the 387th Bombardment Group (M).

For the Commanding Officer:

GLENN R. DICKERSON,
1st lt., Air Corps,
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1700 ###]

Auth: CG 9AF
Date: 4 Jan 44
Init:

87th Service Squadron

APO 149, US Army 7 August 1944.

SUBJECT: Squadron History (Installment VII, 31 July 1944

TO : Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, U. S. Army

1. In compliance with Letter, Hq, 53rd Service Group, Subject: Unit History, 23rd January 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 7 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers, 223 Enlisted Men

c. Arrived AAF Station 175, Dunkeswell, near Honiton, Devon, 28 July 1943. Departed AAF Station 173 and arrived at AAF Station 162, Chipping-Ongar, Essex, 13 November 1945, Departed AAF Station 162, 27 December 1943 and arrived at AAF Station 166, Matching Green, Essex 27 December 1943,

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations and Awards: Negative.

2. There was very little activity during the month of July. Incessant bad weather curtailed operations. Negligible enemy opposition reduced battle damage on the aircraft participating in missions so that Bomb Group ground crews were able to handle practically all necessary work. From time to time it was necessary for the Bomb Group to remove a ship from the line because of severe battle damage or by some serious defect in the mechanics of the ship. This ship was replaced by one of the aircraft this organization has been keeping in a pool as a reserve for just such a contingency. The replaced ship would then be placed in condition or sent to the depot for fourth echelon maintenance.

3. With more time to spare an educational program was organized. Sessions taking in everything current from the latest allied advance to the "GI Bill of Rights” were held. This was required attendance for all personnel. More emphasis was placed on physical conditioning. The organization was split into three groups and rotated daily so that everyone would have the benefit of training. Hikes, baseball, volleyball, and basketball were part of the program.

WESLEY B. GOVER, JR,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1701 ###]

Auth: CO IX AF
Date: 4 August 1944
Initials:

COMPANY HISTORY of the 873RD CHEMICAL COMPANY, AIR OPERATIONS (H or M)

1 July 1944 to 31 July 1944

Organization: Negative.

Strength: As of 31 July 1944, the strength of this organization was four (4) Officers and one hundred and twenty nine (129) Enlisted Men.

Movement: Detachment "A" of this organization, consisting of two (2) Officers and Sixty five (65) enlisted Men left AAF Station 162 during the week of 16 July and are now at AAF Station 452. Some of the Enlisted Men made this trip in Ninth Air Force C-47 Transport planes. This was the first move ever made by this organization in which any personnel of the organization traveled by air.

Decorations: Negative.

Casualties: Negative.

With increased Allied Operations, many Enlisted Men of this organization were tagged with the new name of "Ammunition Worker". In addition to their regular duties of handling and storing Chemical Ammunition, these men assisted the Service Group Ordnance Company and the Ordnance Sections of the Bomb Squadrons in handling and loading planes with Ordnance Ammunition.

A Company party was held in the School Hall at Shenfield, Essex on the 14th day of the month. Beer, food and girls were plentiful and a good time was had by all. Everyone in the organization is looking forward to another party in the near future.

All members of the organization attended school on Orientation and many attended the training films shown at the Base Theater. These activities are made possible through the efforts of the S-3 Section of the 53rd Service Group.

Only one member of the Organization was on DS during the month. Cpl. Donald G. Devitt attended the Instructors Course on Aircraft Recognition at South Port, Lancashire for a period of 10 days.

On the 23rd of the month an inter-company Enlisted Men's Council was formed, consisting of one man of each rank as a representative of all EM of that respective rank. Those elected were Pvt. James Connolly, Pfc Lee A. Peters, T/5th George. W. Doyle, Cpl. Donald G. Devitt, Sgt. Harlan P. Marshek and S/Sgt. Alfred A. Cataloni. 1st Sergeant William J. Dougherty was elected chairman of the council. Meetings with the Commanding officer are held each Saturday at 1500 hours. The first meeting was held on the 29th of July and many topics were discussed including the mess situation, passes and company duty.

Frequent inspections were made of the company area and quarters by the Commanding Officer. Weekly inspections of all weapons were held and any descrenpancies were corrected as soon as possible and inspected again by Lt. Robert H. Gray, Supply Officer of this organization.

All H-Bombs which are stored by this organization were individually inspected for leakage and the seams were painted with Liquid Vesicant Paint so that any leakage may be easily detected. Schedules have been made for Future inspections of these bombs. This work is under the able supervision of S/Sgt. Alfred A. Cataloni and S/Sgt. Jack B. Skidmore.

A new guard procedure has been established at our Ammunition Area. A Guard Tent has been set up at the entrance to the Area and an armed guard is Stationed here 24 hours a day. All of the guards are furnished by this company. The entire Ammunition Area has now been enclosed with barbed wire and guards walk post along the inside of this enclosure. Special Orders for these guards nave been drawn up by Captain John J. O'Hara and copies of these orders have been distributed as follows: 1 copy for the Company bulletin board, 1 copy for the guard tent, one copy for the base adjutant and one copy for the Provost Marshal.

On the 18th of the month, 1st Lt. Robert H. Gray was transferred from the detachment to this headquarters and 1st Lt. Otis W. Neal was transferred from this headquarters to the detachment.

No recent company picture has been made because of the fact that since the arrival of this organization to this theater of operations, the company has divided into two sections. The last picture made of this organization was made at Herbert Smart Airport, Macon, Georgia just prior to our leaving the United States for overseas duty. There have been very few changes in personnel since that picture was taken.

There were no maps of any kind made during the month or any secret documents that might be classed as Company History.

For the Commanding Officer:

ROBERT H. GRAY
1st. Lt., CWS, Historical Officer


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1703 ###]

873 Chemical Weapons Squadron - Squadron personnel photo


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1704 ###]

SUBJECT: Unit History TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. Attn: Group Historian.

1. The following is the July installment of the Unit History of this organization. Changes were as follows:

a. Organization: On Special Orders Number 125 of the 53rd Service Group, dated 11 July 1944, the following men were transferred from the Company:

T/5 Norbert A. Lisowski 39274163 (950)
T/5 Cecil P. Huff 34186357 (950)
T/5 Herbert F. Worm 36243564 (955)
Pvt Morris Novack 33786735 (955)

On an unnumbered Memorandum of Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 15 July 1944, the following man was transferred from 1812th Ordnance S & M Company of this Group:
Pfc James G. McMahon 39186467 (237)

On Special Orders Number 199 of the Hq, 13th Replacement Control Depot (Avn), dated 20 July 1944, the following men were transferred to the Company:

T/Sgt Robert J. Brown 7060434 (648)
Sgt Eugene M. Field 37285066 (237)
Pfc Douglas F. Daugherty 19176378 (955)
Pfc Beryl R. Cullen 16127760 (955)
Pvt Ronald W. Wood 19170878 (650)

On Special Orders Number 18 of the Hq, AAF Station 462, dated 29 July 1944, the following men were relieved from the 13th RCD (Avn) and assignedf to the 1052nd:

Cpl Winton L. Lenz 36812440 (950)
Cpl George W. Dinger 33292992 (851)

On Special Orders Number 208 of the Hq, 2nd Tactical Air Depot, dated 27 July 1944, transferred to the Company was:

T/5 Keiner E. Shumaker 34178731 (238)

b. Strength: The Company was four men under normal strength at the beginning of the month, and the transfer of four men brought the total ??? assigned bringing the strength to one above normal.

c. Movement: The Supply and Repair Team "B" of the Company moved on 18 July 1944 on an order by teletype from IX Bomber Command directing the 387th Bomb Group (M) and its associated units to move to Stony Cross, AAF Station 452.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Under the provisions of 600-69, 4 May 1943, Memorandum Number 35-18 of Hq, Ninth Air Force, dated 20 December 1943, and General Order Number 9 of Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 11 July 1944, the GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL was awarded to the following named personnel:

T/4 Robert J. Martin 46245300 955
T/4 Bernard (NMI) Kastner 35220090 951
T/5 William W. Craig 35800677 647
T/5 Finley M. Gleason, Jr 39024227 955
T/5 Knowles R. Roberts 34820933 647
T/5 Edward E. Sheerer 33508965 951
T/5 William E. Siebold 31354795 647
T/5 Norbert A. Lisowski 39274163 239
Cpl Cecil C. Summers 18039762 405
Pfc Thomas H. Conn 38434696 647
Pfc Edward J. P. Murphy 11115777 773
Pvt Aven B. Moody 18125096 650
Pvt Morris Novack 33786735 ?55
Pvt Clarence C. Rankin, Jr 33301555 766

2. On the date of this writing, D plus 55, the organization is still in England. The Allied armies continue, as radio Tokio expressed it, "retreating haphazardly inland". The fact that the Germans were able to employ only fifty percent of the available divisions and troops moved from ?? after D-Day had to march three hundred miles through France in spite of the ?? - All this because of the effectiveness of the attacks of the Tactical Air Forces on transportation facilities and troop movements - indicates that the effort in which the 1052nd participated had had a material effect upon the invasion.

3. On the 18th, D-Day plus ??, Team B moved to a new station. The following are personnel of the Team:

TEAM COMMANDER
1st Lt John M. Casson O-1643738 4400

RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
M/Sgt Malcolm D. Raines 34231859 955

ASST RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/3 Francis S. Brownell 11039851 951

AIRBORNE RADIO CHIEF
T/4 Bernard (NMI) Kastner 35220090 951

WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/Sgt Frank A. Swider 33135179 581

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
Sgt Lawrence A. Brennan 12056692 821

WAREHOUSEMEN
T/5 Henry L. Pratt, Jr 38410858 835
T/5 John W. Depew 34186223 835

TEAM CLERK
T/5 Robert H. Paul 33247036 405

LINEMEN
T/5 William W. Pinkerous 32240257 238

TR & TG CHIEF
T/5 Robert J. Higgins 12059069 239

TELEPHONE OPERATOR
Pvt Walter J. Stilley 34147463 650

RADAR REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Robert J. Martin 46245300 955

RADAR REPAIRMEN
T/5 John S. Serick 32730107 955
T/5 William C. Finley 38318823 955
T/5 Richard C. Matthews 13150898 955
T/5 Frederick A. Hofmann 13159542 955

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Knowles R. Roberts 34820933 647
T/5 David S. Hymovitz 33054079 647
T/5 William E. Siebold 31354795 647

VHF RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Simon H. Snider 38329725 951

VHF RADIO REPAIRMEN
Pfc Thomas H. Conn 38434696 647

a. It was decided it would be necessary to have a clerk in the ?? T/5 Bob Paul was added to the Team. Also three men were ?? to provide communications. T/5 "Pinky" Pinkerous will maintain telephone circuits, Bob Higgins, who was promoted to T/5 this month, becuase of his versatility, given charge of teletype operation and maintenance and telephone operations, and he will be assisted by Pvt Stilley. Pvt Walter B. Brooks, 13044275, (855), of Hq & Hq Sq was put on temporary duty with the Team. T/5 John Serick did not move with the Team as he was sent to hospital.

b. The first movement left Station 162 at 0730 hours, 14 July, and arrived at Station 452 at 1430. The party included T/5 Dave Lymovitz, in charge, T/5 Richard Matthews, second in command, T/5 Knowles Roberts, and T/5 William Siebold. Upon arrival the party learned that the Team was assigned to Site 2 and quarters consisting of one hut for twenty-one men and no provisions for Orderly Room, Company Supply, or Warehouse and Repair Shop. An effort to secure more facilities was unsuccessful. To complicate matters the site is a "beautiful gully" as the boys expressed it, a former swamp land and very muddy and dirty. Four days were spent in cleaning up the hut and perparing for the arrival of the rest. Difficulties were alleviated somewhat by the discovery that the nearest pub is operated by the NAAFI, and a way was discovered to bypass the gate; therefore, the evening hours were spent here and in the army's most desirable occupation, bunk fatigue.

c. The second movement left 162 at 0445, July 18, and arrived at 1230. This party consisted of five men, M/Sgt Malcolm Rains, driving the jeep, T/Sgt Swider and T/5 Henry Pratt, driving the 2 1/2 ton warehouse truck and trailer with the Warehouse supplies, and T/3 Francis Brownell and T/5 Robert J. Martin, driving the Radio Repair truck and trailer. The balance of the men were to have traveled by C-47 transport plane, but due to bad weather the flight was cancelled. This was a big disappointment to the men who had been looking forward to flying, but in spite of this the movement was the usual riotous 1052nd affair made possible by the exceptional comradship that exists in the organization. Six trucks were requisitioned from 166 for the movement and included a 2 1/2 furnished by the 1052nd and driven by S/Sgt John Corsall and T/5 Reece Drinnen. Although K-rations were not issued, our crew "accidentally" acquired on ration per man. The party left at 1245, 18 July, and arrived at 1815. As the convoy left Enfield the camouflage on one of the trucks caught fire but was quickly extinguished; on one of the ten-minute breaks a flat tire was discovered; many convoys were passed on the road; but other than this the trip was without incident.

d. Part of the former crew room in the 53rd Tech Site was obtained for the Warehouse and Repair Room, and a small sized hut near the living quarters served as an orderly room and houses T/5 Higgins' operation section. The living quarters are slightly crowded, but our boys, always with an eye for the sensational and verve, came up with a linoleum for the floor. The ??? pub ??? customers. We ?? that Southampton, the nearest city, is not very far, and nothing is now known about the surrounding towns. This part of the country is very hilly, making bicycling practically out of the question. The boys ran into S/Sgt Harrell G. ?c?ff, formally of this organization, whose company had been stationed at 452.

4. HEADQUARTERS SECTION

COMPANY COMMANDER:
CAPTAIN WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR., O-469001 0210

FIRST SERGEANT:
F/Sgt Robert (NMI) Gray 35262884 585

ADM & TECH CLERK:
S/Sgt Merhl W. Sulcer 33371646 275

CLERK TYPIST:
T/4 John M. McCarty 31062428 405
T/4 Byrne W. Pike 39844307 656

SUPPLY SERGEANTS:
Sgt Jerome V. Lundblad 39280944 405
Sgt Laurel C. Howard 39831883 821

SUPPLY CLERKS:
T/5 Peter (NMI) Slata 33362208 766
Pvt Aven B. Moody 18125096 650

MOTOR TRANS NCO:
S/Sgt John J. Corsall, Jr. 12067069 813

AUTOMOBILE MECH:
T/5 Laverne J. Tiedeman 36246651 014

ARMORER:
T/5 Anton Klein 37287074 511

COOK:
T/4 Ciro M. Montuori 12191777 060
T/5 Fred (NMI) Bedross 32872058 060

COOK'S HELPER:
Pfc Jimmie A. Holland 38274603 060

BASE DEFENSE:
Pvt Tom D. Olin 36735567 647

a. A service offered to the members of the Company not mentioned heretofore in this History is publicity releases on individuals through the Public Relations Office. Below is the on S/Sgt John Fischer used an an example because it is a complete printing of the information issued by the publicity writer of this organization. This type of general release was available until the invasion, an a number were sent in each week. Now only ?? stories are accepted such as promotions and communications and human interest stories. A release from this organization is given on every promotion if the man wishes it. The article reproduced below appeared in the May edition of the "Lincoln Telephone News" published by the Lincoln (Nebraska) Telephone & Telegraph Company for whom Sgt Fischer worked:

JOHN FISCHER CITED IN ARMY PRESS RELEASE

A press release directed to the "Telephone News" from Headquarters, Ninth Air Force, European Theater of Operations, gives our Sgt Johnnie Fischer a choice bit of publicity. In that it is the first Army press release the "News" has been honored with, it is reproduced in its entirety.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Staff Sergeant John Fischer, age 24, husband of Mrs. John Fischer, 425, 6?th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska, is now serving overseas as Wire Chief with the Ninth Air Force Service Command, Advance Air Depot Area, Signal Company, somewhere in England.

The Ninth Air Force Service Command acts in a gigantic invisible herd, supporting Ninth Air medium bombers and fighter planes on their forrays over enemy-occupied territory. It supplies bombs, guns, ammunition, spare parts, tools, oxygen, clothing and skilled technical labor. It maintains equipment at the highest peak of efficiency and repairs all battle damage for America's tactical component of the Allied Expeditionary Air Force.

Segeant Fischer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Fischer, ?? Street, Lincoln, Nebraska, was graduated from Lincoln High School in 193?. Prior to entering military service on February 3, 1943, Sgt Fischer was employed by the Lincoln Telephone & Telegraph Company as a combination man. Before leaving for overseas service, late in 1943, Sgt Fischer was staioned at Florence, Army Air Field, Florence, South Carolina.

b. This month the Company located the Training Film Library of the Eastern Base Section at Bury St. Edmunds, so a number of trips were made to acquire films which were shown at Station 166. Team B saw a number of them before moving to the new base, and on ?? July a group of films were shown at two performances for the 809th Signal Company Depot Aviation at the 2nd Tactical Air Depot, our next higher supply headquarters, and the other Signal Companies, Service Group, under this depot. Following is a list of films shown:

Shown to Company:

TF-11-205 - Safeguarding Military Information
1-72A - Camouflage of Airdromes
7-1061 - Daylight Reconaisance Patrol
11-551 - Motor Vehicle Driver
11-321 - Combat Counter Intelligenc.
21-2014 - Baptism of Fir.
30-2033 - Sucker Bait
21-1028 - Heroes
21-1019 - Crack that Tank
21-1018 - Keep It Clean
1-71708 - Squadron Communication Officer

Shown to Telephone and Telegraph Sections:

11-1234 - Telephone Switchboard Operator
11-1229 - Teletype Set E-97-A
1-206C - Telegraph Printer Operation
1-207CF - Telegraph Printer General Principles
1-210 - Telegraph Printer

Shown to Radio Operations and Message Center Sections:

TF-11-2064 - Radio Transmission Security
11-671 - Message Center Procedur.
1-331? - The Radio Operator

Shown to Radio Repair Sections:

11-217 - Aerial Radio Aids
4-1325 - Radio Set, SCR-58A
4-1363 - Radar Spotting of Trial Fir.
-63 - Mark II & III IFF Set
1-76 - Radio Compass in Flight

Some of the films in the first group listed were shown to the whole Service Group by Group S-3 along with the "Why We Fight" series shown this month.

c. Another training program introduced by S-3 is classes in Army Orientation which a part of the Company attends each week. Early in the month a traveling school unit on mines and booby traps was on the Station. on Special Orders Number 120 of Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 1 July 1944, T/5 William Pinkerous and T/5 Frederick Hofmann were sent to a mines and booby trap school at AAF Station 124. During the early part of the month Sgt William W. Casey and T/5 William R. Siebold attended a course in Bomber Radio Maintenance. They left in June on Special Orders Number 117 of Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 25 June 1944.

d. During the month the Company Orderly Room was painted and the appearance improved considerably. The Company soft ball league began anew and was featured by the Wiremen defeating the Radio Operators.

WIRE CHIEF
T/Sgt Jarvis J. Phillips 16043194 950

ASST WIRE CHIEF
S/Sgt John (NMI) Fischer 37471453 261

LINEMEN & INSTALLER REPAIRMEN
T/4 Thomas J. Brennan 33712143 950
T/5 Robert A. Phelps 37493604 950
T/5 Keiner E. Schumaker 34178731 238
Pfc Leland (NMI) Johnson 37285804 950
Pfc Ormal P. Goodell 36554706 950
Pfc Calvin C. Hornbeck 15075230 238
Pfc Willie D. Risher 14099839 238
Cpl Winton L. Lenz 36812440 950

TELETYPE MECHANICS
T/4 Stanley A. Szoda 32241294 239

MESSAGE CENTER CHIEF
S/Sgt Raymond (NMI) Perry 34178024 667

ASST MESSAGE CENTER CHIEFS
Sgt Florience R. Dicke, Jr 35336466 667
Sgt Floyd H. VanGuilder 31114163 667

MESSAGE CENTER CLERKS
T/5 Edward J. Doyle 11088302 667
T/5 Meyer S. Finkelstein 12082078 667
Pvt Samuel (NMI) Ben 12096566 667
Pvt Kenneth H. Lincoln 12207730 667

MOTOR MESSENGERS
Pfc Willard M. Austin 12066999 590
Pfc James L. Drinnen 34186258 590

CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
T/Sgt Anthony J. Laraia 31045818 766

ASST CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
S/Sgt Robert G. Kampert 13152313 766

RADIO OPERATORS
T/4 Frank J. Squadrito 13098795 766
T/4 William F. Finn 31098430 766
T/5 Clifford S. Jelliff 12098430 766
T/5 Leland (NMI) Montgomery 15104546 766
Pfc Edward J. P. Murphy 11115777 766
Pfc Edward A. Olsen 12095760 766
Pvt Clarence C. Rankin, Jr 33301555 766

CHIEF TELEPHONE OPERATOR
T/5 Will T. Shiflet 38413103 238

TELEPHONE OPERATORS
Pfc Donald I. McCoy 16101404 650
Pfc Ernest F. Colbath 31114167 650
Pfc Charles L. Coley 36718896 650
Pvt Ronald W. Wood 19170878 ???

CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
S/Sgt Harold M. Bauer 37115135 237

ASST CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
Sgt Warren S. Parsons 34537736 237

TELETYPE OPERATORS
T/5 Ben T. Ware, Jr 34597673 237
Pfc Richard E. Otis 36479127 237
Pfc Howard F. Fischer 35684695 237
Sgt Eugene M. Field 37285066 237
Pfc James G. McMahon 39186467 237

a. The biggest job the communications sections had this month was to take down the telephone system at Station 162 and setting up a new one for Team B at Station 452. The lines at 162 were removed immediately after the Team left. On the 21st CAPTAIN RIECK with T/5 Jelliff as driver and Wire Chief Phillips and his men, T/4 Brennan, T/5 Phelps, Pfc Goodell, Pfc Johnson, and Pfc Fisher went to 452 and installed nineteen extensions and two trunk lines to the base switchboard as well as putting in some circuits for the Staion Complement Squadron. This work was accomplished in record time. It is hoped that a GPO line will be obtained for the Team.

b. Sergeants Lerais and Perry completed painting the Communications Center this month and have received many complements on the neat appearance of the installation. The building and the radio trailer were inspected by the units who came to the Station for the training films on the 17th, and they expressed admiration for the boys' work.

c. This month T/5 Cecil P. Huff, 34186357, Chief Switchboard Operator and a member of the first group of men to join the Company after its activation, was transferred from the Company. Will Shiflet was promoted to T/5 and appointed the new chief. Also in the Section Ernest Colbath was promoted to Pfc.

TEAM A
TEAM COMMANDER
2nd Lt William W. Pashwa O-1645273 500

#SUPPLY
WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
S/Sgt John J. Costello 12034091 862

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/5 Reece B. Drinnen 34186188 835

WAREHOUSEMEN
Cpl Cecil C. Summers 18039762 405
Pvt Joseph J. McFadden 31161569 835

#RADIO MAINTENANCE
RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/Sgt Vaughn W. Gagosian 31355338 647

ASST RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Donnis E. Taylor 34395374 955

AIRBORNE RADIO CHIEF
Sgt William W. Casey 36171752 647

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 William W. Craig 35800677 647
T/5 Aaron K. Kraft 16097032 647
Cpl Raymond N. Blair 33553738 647

VHF RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
Sgt Joseph C. Bleiler 31090438 951

VHF RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Edward E. Sheerer 33508965 951
T/5 Tolbert J. Neibich 33506232 647
Cpl George W. Dinger 33292992 951

RADAR REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 George C. Lewis 39324364 955

RADAR REPAIRMEN
T/5 Richard M. Ramsbey 35541621 955
T/5 George M. Parker, Jr 16085397 955
T/5 Finley M. Gleason, Jr 39024227 955
Pfc Beryl R. Cullen 16127760 955
Pfc Douglas F. Daugherty 19176378 955

???????
T/Sgt Robert J. Brown 7060434 648

d. The repair and supply functions performed for the Bomb Group has dropped off considerably, but the Section Chief Gagosian, master of keeping his men busy, interested in their work, and planning new ideas, had many activities in progress during the month. One of the problems which had to be solved was the fact that the corrugated iron and very large hangers were in a direct path between the shop and the control tower. This presented a very grave problem for the very reflective VHF transmission, so the boys built a a very directional antenna and installed it on the roof which removed the difficulty. With the new directional antennas at both Teams the VHF sections could communicate with each other to check frequencies and so forth, but since Team B moved the distance is too great. The Radio Section in cooperation with the Wire Section are working on their invention, a telephone amplifier. Some difficulties were encountered and had not been ironed out completely as yet. The Photographic Section is going full blast. It had such a back log of work that Sergeants Gagosian and Taylor and Corporals Shearer and Neibich have been working almost nightly to keep the work up. T/5 Ramsbey, another photographic man, has been on DS at 1st TMD at Station 479. The Section received several new men this month, and our Crew Trainer expert, Aaron Kraft, was promoted to T/5.

7. It will be noted that the majority of activity this month was other than routine duties, Since D-Day our Bomb Group have not been very active. The Fighter Groups of the Ninth Air Force are performing most of the ground support. The medium bombers have attacked flying bomb installations several times and attacked other targets, but a number of missions have been cancelled because of bad weather. Even administrative traffic ha been extremely light. This comparative inactivity has been responsible for our ability to pursue many special activities. The flying bombs or "doodle-bugs" continued to come over this month, and exploding in the near vicinity are a daily occurrence. The outstanding social event of the month was a birthday party given for the First Soldier, F/Sgt Robert Gray. It featured a gorgeous bottle of gin donated by LT. PASHWA and took place at the Greyhound in Romford. The revelers included T/Sgt "Pop" Laraia, T.Sgt Swider, T/Sgt "Naw" Phillips, S/Sgt John Costello, S/Sgt "Sack" Sulcer, S/Sgt "Rebel" Perry, S/Sgt John Fisher, T/3 Francis Brownell, Sgt "NYC" Howard, Sgt Larry Brennan, and Sgt Mike Cafola, formally of the Company and now with the 1112th Signal Company. The 1052nd room at the King's Head at Norton is still featuring mild and bitters and music from T/4 McCarty's guitar.

8. The 1052nd was honored with two commendations this month, both from 1st Advanced Air Depot Area, IX Air Force Service Command, our next highest administrative and technical headquarters. The first, signed by MAJOR STINSON, the Signal Officer, described the main frame designed and built by S/Sgt Fischer which has been described in previous installments. The second commended CAPTAIN RIECK for a Signal Supply and Maintenance SOP written by him. Acting as Group Signal Officer and Company Commander, CAPTAIN RIECK felt that because so many different directives from so many headquarters were in effect a simplified and complete explanation of procedure was necessary for the information and guidance of units serviced by this Organization. In that no other unit had attempted this undertaking the commendation complemented the organization not only for thoroughness but for originality and directed that other units prepare a similar directive. This complement was very encouraging as it has always been the policy of this Company to see that copies of all directives are disseminated to all concerned and that they are fully understood. Copies of both commendations are appended.

9. In this History it has been felt justified to speak of the versatility and humor of the Company. Added to the list this month is the accomplishment of a poet, Pfc Edward John Patrick Murphy, who had one of his efforts in the July 11th issue of "The Stars and Stripes" in the very popular column "Hash Marks". we feel it is typical of "soldier humor" of which the Army is justly proud:

If you're in a pub, and you hear a doodle-bug, don't run off and leave your mug, take it with you!

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1713 ###]

HEADQUARTERS 1ST ADVANCED AIR DEPOT AREA IX AIR FORCE SERVICE COMMAND

APO 149, US Army

In reply refer to:

SUBJECT: Commendation on Establishing Precedent on Procedure, TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, AAF 166, US Army.

1. The Signal Officer has brought to the attention of this Headquarters the letter issued by the 1052nd Signal Company, Service Group, on the establishment of policy for Signal Corps Supply and Maintenance, for the use of its dependent units.

2. This letter is quite thorough in its portent, and it is the desire of this Headquarters, together with the Signal Officer of this Command, to commend the 1052nd Signal Company, Service Group, on its foresight, and ability to put into use such precedent of procedure. A copy of this letter is bring reproduced and sent to all similar organizations of this Command, to be used as a guide in the preparation of a similar directive, in order to increase the efficiency and speed up operations of all agencies concerned.

By order of Colonel VOSS:

ROBERT F. CHUPP,
Major, A.G.D.
Adjutant General.

1 Incl: Ltr on Signal Supply and Maint. Procedure


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1714 ###]

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE GROUP

13 June 1944

In reply refer to: 400.12

SUBJECT: Signal Corps Supply and Maintenance.

TO: Commanding Officers, All Units, AAF Station 162. Commanding Officers, All Units, AAF Station 166.

1. Signal Supply

A. Only authorized channels of supply will be followed by organizations. All requests for Signal Supplies for units serviced by this Group will be made to the 1052nd Signal Company (SG) of the Service Team concerned.

B. Initial issue of common Signal supplies and equipment will be handled by the unit concerned directly with the appropriate SOS Base Section.

C. Initial organizational equipment for newly arrived and newly activated units will not be requisitioned by the unit but will be issued automatically in accordance with memorandum No. 65-9, Hq., IX PSC, dated 13 March 1944. Units transferred to the Ninth Air Force will requisition shortages in accordance with same memorandum. Shortages of initial issue equipment will be shown on required reports as prepared by unit supply officer. Hq., IX AFSC is responsible for all initial T/BA and T/E shortages.

D. Initial issue of controlled items will normally be made on the basis of the appropriate Table of Allowances. All equipment in excess of authorized allowances will he considered as controlled items and will be issued in accordance with the current overall tactical situation existing in the theater. Certain items of Signal Corps equipment are in short supply in this theater and will, until further notice, be designated as critical items. They will be distributed and processed in the same manner as controlled items but will not be listed on reports calling specifically for controlled items only.

E. Requisitions to be picked up by organizations in in theater will be held. by the Signal Corps Depot for a period of thirty (30) days from the date of notification to the organizations concerned that the equipment is available to be picked up. If equipment is not called for within the period specified, the requisition will be automatically cancelled and the equipment placed in depot stocks.

F. All equipment on changes and supplements to Tables of Authorization is automatically requisitioned and supplied by the Headquarters of IX AFSC or IX BC. Requisitions are merely reminders and are not favorably received.

G. Procedure for obtaining SOS Equipment and Supplies for Alerted IX AFSC Units will be in accordance with subject letter Hq., 1st AADA, IX AFSC, dated 5 May 1944, file 400.12. Normal supply channels will be followed.

H. Request for British type Signal supplies and equipment, if approved, will be forwarded in duplicate to Signal Supply Section of Service Team concerned. Equipment will be secured through British Liaison Officer of depot concerned.

I. All expendable items other then small amounts of minor items will be requisitioned. Full allowance of expendable supplies are authorized to be on hand in accordance with availability of items.

J. Unit supply officers should anticipate maintenance needs and requisition supplies well in advance of time needed.

2. Requisition Procedur.

A. Units will requisition on any supply form available and in two (2) copies only, except where noted. One copy will be returned to the unit showing action taken.

B. Separate requisitions will be submitted for:

(1) Quantities of authorized supplies and equipment within established limits including uncontrolled items peculiar to the Air Force.

(2) Quantities of authorized supplies and equipment in excess of established limits. All units of Bomber Commend will request approval for issues of all controlled items and equipment in excess of authorized allowances through command channels only. Upon approval from Bomber Commend, Air Force Service Command will authorize items to be issued through normal supply channels.

(3) Requests for replacements of T/BA items will be forwarded through normal supply channels stating reason for request. Certificate of fair wear and tear or approved report of survey rill be attached where applicable.

(4) Request for items other than T/BA or T/E will be submitted in letter form in seven (7) copies starting reason for request and submitted through normal supply channels. Seven (7) copies of requisition must be attached to request

C. Requisitions will contain the following:

(1) Organization for which property is requisitioned.

(2) Basis and authority on which requisition is made.

(3) Stock numbers, nomenclature or complete description of item and columns headed On Hand and Due, Consumed, and Required mist be filled in.

D. Statement of Charges and Reports of Survey will in some cases act as requisitions.

3. Excess and Surplus Property

A. All excess signal property will be turned in to the Signal Warehouse. Service unit will make immediate re-issue to other units within the supply channel where shortages exist. Excess airborne parts and equipment not required for operation and repair will be forwarded to the Signal Warehouse Section of the Service Team concerned.

B. Prompt repair and subsequent return to stock of repairable items is required. Defective equipment for which replacement is desired should accompanied by an appropriate certificate of use in Government Service and replacement will be on the exchange method whenever possible. All T/BA or TZ controlled items which have been turned in for repair or salvage and not repaired or replaced within a reasonable amount of time (not more then 30 days) will be dropped from unit records and shown as a shortage on the material status reports which is important in this regard. Unit will contact Signal Supply Section of Service Team Tor authority to drop item from records.

C. All radio equipment from crashed aircraft will be salvaged and turned over to the Signal Supply Section of the Service Team concerned in accordance with existing regulations on salvage of aircraft. This includes all secret and confidential American and British equipment which must be accounted for by the Signal Group (SG) and Mobile Repair and Reclamation Squadrons of the Service Group.

4. Signal Maintenance:

A. Second echelon maintenance within the Service Group and third echelon maintenance of all Signal Corps equipment of units serviced by the Servic. Group, including all communication equipment, airwarning and aircraft radio and telephone equipment will be performed by the responsible Signal Maintenance Section of the Signal Company (3G)

B. All repairable items and assemblies will be forwarded to the Signal Supply Warehouse of the Team concerned within 48 hours of removal from aircraft or within 48 hours of damage of equipment itself.

5. Security

A. Certain items of Signal Corps equipment must be safeguarded at all times, including during storage, shipment, and use; therefore, proper security measures must be complied with and enforced by all personnel and organizations concerned. Security measures and certificates of destruction will be in accordance with Army Regulation 380-5.

By order of Lieutenant Colonel CALDWELL:

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps Group Signal Officer.

OFFICIAL:

FRANK E. ROBINS, JR.,
Captain, Air Corps
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1719 ###]

HEADQUARTERS 1ST ADVANCED AIR DEPOT AREA IX AIR FORCE SERVICE COMMAND OFFICE OF THE SIGNAL OFFICER

APO 149, US Army

In reply refer to: 413.44

SUBJECT: Mobile Telephone Main Frame.

TO: COMMANDING OFFICER, 1052ND SIG.CO. SERV. GP. AAF 166

1. On a recent Field Contact trip conducted by the Signal Officer, 1st AADA, it was noticed that the 1052nd Signal Company, Service Group, had constructed a very good main frame to be used with the TC-12, The frame is highly mobile and incorporates the following:

A. Test Set EE-65 (mounted on top of the frame).

B. Toleringer (mounted on side of frame).

C. 56 pair Jacks and Sockets for sixty extensions. (6 Sockets placed at the bottom on each side of the frame).

D. Fuse panels to accommodate the sixty extensions.

E. Rubber covered cable leads from the fuses to the boards.

2. The frame is supported and protected by two angle irons formed into an inverted "U" design, and separated by approximately 18".

3. The Mobile Telephone Central Main frame is designed for the purpose of speeding up installation of telephone communications for a Service Group. It is to be used with either W-110-B Field Wire or rubber covered cable, five or ten pair. The frame will accommodate three (3) TC-12 switchboards, each consisting of 20 extensions and 4 trunks, 2 total of 72 lines, plus 16 repeater coils for phantom circuits.

IRA F. STINSON,
Major, Signal Corps Signal Officer.

2 Incl: Photograph


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1720 ###]

Auth: CO, 53rd Serv Gp
Date: 4 Aug 1944
Initials:

1176TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY, SERVICE GP (AVN)
APO 149, US Army.

4 August 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History

To: Group Historian, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. The following is a subsequent installment of the Unit History of this organization for the month July 1944.

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: (As of 31 July 1944) 2 Officers, 39 EM

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. Unit Narrative:

At present this unit is accomplishing, with EM of its various units, the task assigned them. These include the requisitioning, receiving, storage, and issue of all food, clothing and equipment, gasoline and oil, and the laundry, dry cleaning, shoe repair, and salvage service necessary at this station.

A Company Party was held on 28 July 1944 to celebrate one (1) year's activation of this unit. Guests of the Officers and EM were girls from nearby towns and member of the ATS. Dance music was furnished by a band from the REME. The refreshment menu included:

Potato Salad
Sandwiches (Corned Beef and Cheese)
Deviled Eggs
Apple turnovers
Oranges
Ice Cream (Pineapple)
Coca Cola (British)
BEER (Bitter)

A good time was had by all.

DANIEL W. MAHONEY
1st Lieut., QMC
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1721 ###]

Auth: CO, AAF Sta 166
Date: 4 August 1944
Initials: ???

COMPANY HISTORY of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn)

1 July 1944 to 31 July 1944

Organization: Negative.

Strength: as of 31 July 1944, the strength of the organization was four Officers and seventy-four Enlisted Men.

Movement: Negative.

Casualties: Negative.

Decorations: Negative.

On the 15 July 1944 an inter-company Enlisted Man's Council was formed. One Man to represent each of the different grades was elected. These Men are: Pvt Salvatore J. Mennella (Privates), Pfc George Tater (Privates First Class), T/5 George T. Ziegler ( T/5 and Corporals), T/4 Charles L. Crutners (T/4 and Sergeants), T/Sgt Howard F. Koenig (1st 3-graders). The Council then voted that each Monday they would meet with the Commanding Officer at 1630 hours. In their first meeting on 24 July 1944, the main topic of discussion was the Mess situation.

A Company picture was taken in April 1944, but due to censorship regulations the organization was unable to obtain a copy for the Company History until this month. Since the time the picture was taken, there has been many changes in Personnel.

2nd Lt Irving (NMI) Brody (Armament and Supply Officer) came through with flying colors and won the Championship Ping-Pong Match from Lt Albert Lane, QMC. The tournament was between Officers of the 53rd Service Group.

The Headquarters Section of this organization has not been nearly as busy as the other sections. Regular daily routine is 9/10 of the work, done each day in this section. Duties of the Enlisted Men have been cut to a minimum, each Man, of the last 5 grades, gets guard duty once each month. Kitchen Police twice each month. Grades 4 and 1st 3-graders have Charge of Quarters about once every 20 days. For the first time in the history of the organization, the First Sergeant has not had to carry the abuse alone. Despite very little mail, morale is exceedingly high.

The Ammunition Section, under the direction of 1st Lt Fred J. Werran has, since the arrival on this station, been the busiest section of the organization. Upon arriving at the station, the Ammunition Ares was not completed. This section helped build roads, revetments, and hutments. Today the Area is almost complete. They did this aside from storing the ammunition for the Bomb Group. The section is divided into 2 shifts for day and night work. This division enables the EM to have every other night free. There are 2 EM sleeping in the Area and they act as Charge of Quarters. There is an armed guard at the e: ranee to the Area 24 hours per day.

During July some of these Men have received training in loading and fuzing bombs in the aircraft. They are helping the Bomb Group in these operations. This section has had experience in handling propaganda bombs in storage, loading, and fuzing in the aircraft. Since the arrival of the Bomb Group the Ammunition Section has handled approximately 7500 tons of explosives, but the Ammunition Section has handled many more tons.

2nd Lt Irving (NMT) Brody joined this organization 10 March 1944 and was assigned to the Supply and Armament Sections.

T/Sgt Carl C. Cooper, Armament Section Chief and TYSet Howard F. Koenig, Supply Section Chief, and the section members were called in for a general discussion of present and future policies. Existing policies were to remain in force and necessary changes were made to meet the tactical situation as needed.

With increasing Allied Operations, both the Armament and Supply Sections were soon operation et peak performance. Every man "pitched in" and the efficiency of the sections reached a new peak,

The Armament Section's courses in 50 cal. Machine gun function and operation produced a high percentage of trained Men, who in turn instructed members of their respective units. The courses consists of five separate phases: (1) Nomenclature, (2) Disassembly, (3) Assembly, (4) Malfunctions, and (5) Test Firing and Examination.

Frequent inspections of all the units' weapons are made and discrepancies must be quickly eliminated. Weapons turned in for repair are put back in operation the next day or sooner.

T/5 Raterman, our "Fuddy Duddy Watchmaker" keeps the timepieces of the organization in good working order, repairing them in his spare time. If cigarette ashes are dropped on the spotless floor of his Small Arms truck, you are, "a no good so and so".

Sgt Smedley, T/4 Kowalec, Cpl Burns, and Pfc Rochau fulfil their jobs efficiently and thoroughly. Pfc Wall, who is on DS to Station Defense, appears once 4 month to pick up his "G I Cabbage" at the pay table.

These units supplied by this organization are being well supplied, and equipped by the supply section. All ordnance equipment and general supplies for the station, both in-coming and out-going, must clear through the ordnance supply section.

The operation of this section is similar to a small depot and where ever possible depot procedure is used.

The major portion of paper work is under the able control of S/Sgt Lynch, Set Reycik, T/5 Drescher and Pvt Poms.

In the Warehouse, T/Sgt Koenig, T/4 Peddicord, T/5 Jensen and Pvt Dumler operate the issue and receiving sections. Their efficiency promotes a smooth flown of supplies to and from units and can cope with any immediate emergency covering supplies. Sgt Wilson joined this crew. He brought with him many tales from France. His experiences in supplies during combat are no doubt a credit to the function of this section.

Organization Supply Sergeants are kept up to date on current supply problems and procedure and are given all possible assistance and information for proper requisitioning of supplies.

Any problem beyond the scope of the Section Chiefs is taken to the Supply & Armament Officer who makes the decision after it is thoroughly discussed from the point of view that units of this station will benefit by that discussion.

The Maintenance Section under the direction of Lt. Wardell and M/Set Emerson, since the arrival on this field, have received 510 Job Orders to date. 485 of these have been completed. 19 Job Orders have not been completed, including 8 deadlined vehicles. 6 jobs have been taken to Fourth Echelon Maintenance shops.

320 jobs have been completed by auto mechanics and Shop Truck mechanics. These include valve jobs, coils, clutches, Connecting rods, differentials, winches, installing roofs on Shop Trucks, brakes, transmissions, generators, horns, starters, axles, springs, radiators, painting, water-pumps, carburetors, fuel pumps, body work, installing gun mounts, 6000 mile inspections, air cleaners, and engine tune ups.

101 jobs have been completed by the Welders. These include jobs on radiators, file baskets, towing hooks & hitches, burning various holes, bumpers and other body work, plugs, gun mounts, bows and other supports, ammunition boxes, window and door frames, and pipes.

64 jobs have been completed by the Machine Shop Truck and two machinists. These jobs include making nuts & bolts, rethreading nuts & bolts, drilling holes, making tools, turning down shafts, sharpening tools, shaping, tapping holes, making plugs & ells and making various tool and small parts


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1725 ###]

1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn) - Personnel Photo


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1726 ###]

Auth: CO, AAF Sta 452.
Date: 4 August 1944.
Initials: ???

1812th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co. Avn
Office of the Company Commander
53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 4 August 1944

Subject: Unit History.

To: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. Thru: Commanding Officer, Service Team "B", 53rd Service Group.

1. In compliance with Paragraph 3, letter Hq 53rd Service Group, dated 23 January 1944, subject same as bove, the following report is submitted:

A. Organizational: Negative.

B. Strength: 31 July 1944 - 75 EM, 4 Officers.

C. Date of arrival or departure of Station: 21 July 1944 the organization moved from AAF Station 162 for AAF Station 452. Movement was by air and motor transportation.

D. Awards to & Decorations of Members: 37 EM awarded the Good Conduct Medal.

2. Something new has been added! After having spent almost a year at Station 162, we were finally ordered to move along with the rest of the combat and service units formerly assigned to the field. It was a welcome change and most of the men were eager for the change. However, after spending a year at the old station, it was kind of tough to leave old friends behind.

a. The first impression most of the men had upon arriving here was that we were a long, long way from anywhere. However, with time the distances are gradually diminishing. The field is a large one. Our Ammunition Dump is in a heavily wooded area in the far end of the field and contains no revetments and very few huts. The men of this section are building their own huts and are constructing a road which will enable them to store their bombs in a more convenient and accessible place.

b. The Automotive Section is very adequately set up in a "blister" hanger and has been operating very effectively in repairing vehicles which became defective as a result of the numerous convoy trips back and forth from the old station,

e. The Supply and Armament Section also were fortunate in securing an adequate building in which to establish their shops, offices and stockrooms and have carried on with their mission in the usual manner. Our supply depot has been changed to Station 519.

d. Headquarters Section is situated in the center of the men's living quarters and is operating in its usual effective manner. Great credit should be given to the enlisted men of this section who successfully created and maintained both supply and administrative facilities at both the old and the new stations for over a period of two weeks, passes have again been awarded the men and a company party is being planned.

MICHAEL B. HEINDL
Capt, Ord Dept.
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1728 ###]

Auth: CG 9th AF
Init:
Date: 6 August 1944.

HEADQUARTERS
2198TH QUARTERMASTER TRUCK COMPANY AVIATION
53rd SERVICE GROUP
APO 149, US ARMY

6th August 1944

UNIT HISTORY, for Month July 1944:

1. ORGANIZATION: Negative.

2. STRENGTH: 4 Officers, 97 Enlisted Men

3. MOVEMENT: Headquarters: Negative. Det "A": From AAF Station 162 to AAF Station 452.

4. CASULTIES: Negative.

5. DECORATIONS: Negative.

During month of July unit continued to operate and perform duties of a Quartermaster Truck Company attached to Service Teams of a Service Group. The vehicles hauled bombs, rations, air craft parts, personnel, and performed miscellaneous transportation duties at an AAF Station. Detachment "A", 2198th QM Trk Co Avn, consisting of 46 Enlisted men and 2 Officers, moved to AAF Station 452, with Service Team "B" of the 53rd Service Group. The Detachment supplied most of the vehicles connected with the movement, and operated from the Station to Station via the shuttle method. Headquarters, 2198th QM Trk Co., Avn went to Clacton on the Sea for the purpose of firing 50 cal., machine guns at Aerial towed targets. 4 Enlisted men and 2 Officers fired. Results of the firing were satisfactory. Nine 2 1/2 ton GMC trucks were assigned to the unit bringing the total number of 2 1/2 ton trucks to 49.

PAUL S. GLICK
1st Lieut., QMC
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1731 ###]

AUTH: Memo 20-10 IX AFSC
DATE: 7 September 1944
INITIALS:

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP
APO 149 US ARMY

31 August 1944

SUBJECT: Monthly Installment of Unit History

To: Group Historical Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with memorandum, Hqs, IX Air Force Service Command, No. 20-10, dated 5 February 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 27 Officers and 134 Enlisted Men.

c. Movement: Captain Charles E. Bettinger - Group Material Officer, 1st Lt George W. Hoffman - Asst Group Finance Officer (6) E/M Finance Section, (3) E/M Medical Section and (1) E/M Air Corps moved from AAF Station #452 to the Far Shore with Team "B" of the 53rd Service Group.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. A short narrative of the part played in the war by this organization.

a. On August 25th Alert Orders were received and every man in Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron "let go" with a sigh of relief. Here, at last, was the news that had been so eagerly awaited; news that meant an end to "sweating it out® in England; news that gave sharp and clear meaning to the months of preparation, the piles of boxes and pecking cases with their unit markings in bright colors so casually gay and yet so full of import, the estimates of space requirements in transport facilities, the listings of priority items and the thousand and one other details, the meaning and purpose of which appear so complicated and inevitably unfold so clearly in due time. With electrifying suddenness the activities of the Squadron multiplied e hundred fold as blankets and overcoats were stored, clothing marking and show down inspections were held, physicals administered and "shots" received with unexpected cheerfulness. Renewed meanings were derived from the old stand-by Articles of War and every Officer and enlisted men in the Squadron went through the Gas Chamber and perhaps exercized a little more care in adjusting the mask and checking the apparatus. Here, at last, was the opportunity to come to closer grips with the enemy and share in the burdens and hardships, the adventures and excitements of our fellow soldiers across the Channel. Since every projected movement is always accompanied by a countless variety of rumors and guesses, speculation ran high and more than one map was "pin holed" with the hopes and anticipations of the "Campaign Strategists". With reckless abandon wagers were made and extravagant odds freely given as every soldier's pulse quickened in the knowledge that our own D-Day was on the way. And beneath the surface of our "friendly arguments" and daily bickerings there runs the thread of common purpose that makes us look to the future with confidence.

b. In accordance with the principle that "all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy" the men of the Squadron are finding time to plan another get-together. The success of the last Squadron Party has furnished us with a high mark to shoot at and has given us plenty of incentive to make the coming affair an even greater success. Knowing that this may well be our last good time together in England, the committees are working day and night to complete all of the arrangements and while the "event" is still a closely guarded secret in order to maintain the element of surprise the remarks heard here and there have inspired us to pass along this tip; WATCH FOR THE DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED AND DON'T MISS THE PARTY.

c. Captain Walter N. Armbruster, one of our best Officers and our former Commanding Officer was transferred to Hq & Hq Sq, IX Air Force Service Command.

3. This unit is at the present time stationed at AAF Station #166, with Team "A" of the 53rd Service Group. Two (2) Officers and ten (10) enlisted men of this unit are some where in France with Team "B" of the 53rd Service Group.

JOHN A. EVERHARD,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1733 ###]

Auth: CG 9AF
Date: 4 Jan 44
Init:

87th Service Squadron

APO 149, US Army 7 September 1944.

SUBJECT: Squadron History (Installment VIII, 31 August 1944)

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with Letter, Hq, 53rd Service Group, Subject: Unit History, 23rd January 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 8 Officers, 1 Warrant Officers, 233 Enlisted Men

c. Arrived AAF Station 173, Dunkeswell, near Honiton, Devon, 28 July 1943. Departed AAF Station 173 and arrived at AAF Station 162, Chipping Ongar, Essex, 13 November 1943. Departed AAF Station 162, 27 December 1943 and arrived at AAF Station 166, Matching Green, Essex, 27 December 1943.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations and Awards: Negative.

2. The activities of the 87th Service Squadron during the month of August 1944 were primarily concerned with preparation and readiness for overseas departure. On the 22nd of August the long awaited alert orders arrived. All the complex administrative details of moving overseas had to be worked out. SOSTC Forms 8, 8a, 9, and 10 supplying all information on the unit baggage, unit vehicles, unit packing cases to be loaded on vehicles together with their weight and square footage were initiated, filed, and re-made as changes occurred in the original planning. Lt. Hawkins, Squadron Adjutant, who assumed the responsibility for this work held close conferences with all department chiefs until details were worked out minutely. All departments were given instructions to pack away all unnecessaries of immediate importance and operate so that in a few hours given notice everything would be in readiness to leave. Tents were cleared of stoves, English blankets were returned to the Custodial Warehouse, items of furniture and foot lockers were discarded or returned to the liaison warehouse.

3. At the same time the organization was packing, it was necessary to continue with the ordinary function of the service squadron to a tactical group. During the month of August 1944, the engineering section repaired 64 B-26 planes. Most of the work was ordinary battle damage consisting of flak holes in the metal and fabric structure. Nevertheless hard work had to be done on some ships as evidenced by the following: The tedious job of replacing fuel cells was completed on 10 ships and one's complete tail assembly had to be replaced. 2 B-26 which had crashed on take off were salvaged. 1 ship slipped off its jack and fell narrowly missing two mechanics working on the ship at the time. This fall made it necessary to replace the wing which entailed a detail of 6 men to Middle Wallop for the purpose of obtaining a like wing from a salvageable ship which had landed at that base.

WESLEY B. GOVER, JR.,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1734 ###]

Auth: CG Ninth AF
Initials: 5 August 1944

40TH MOBILE R & R SQUADRON AAF Station 166

APO 149 US Army 5 August 1944

314.7

Unit History, August 1944

1. Organization: Negative.

2. Strength: a. Officers 6, F/O 1. b. Enlisted Men 105

3. Movement: Detachment "A" Station 162 transferred to Station 452, authority for transfer not known.

4. Casualties: Negative.

5. Decorations: Negative.

Seventeen enlisted men were promoted on the first of the month, Promotions included: two S Sgts, six Sgts, three Cpls, and six Pfc's. There are still a number of promotions to be filled according to the T/O.

The five unit chiefs and one transportation man attended a seven course in auto maintenance at Station 572. The course was afforded by the 53rd Service Group S-3 and two men at a time ware placed on DS to take advantage of the schooling.

Two medics joined the organization from Hq and Hq squadron of the Service Group, thus bringing all sections of the T/O up to strength. The medics are working with the station sick quarters.

1st Lt, Harvey J. Hartley, O-322784, joined the organization per Par 1, SO 180, Hq, 1st AADA on the 14th of the month. He was assigned to duty as Security officer vice 1st Lt Hysler, Jr, relieved, per squadron order No. 12.

The movement of Detachment A from station 162 to station 452 cut the administration of the Command Section of the Squadron in half. Personnel records, 201 files, Forms 20 and payrolls were turned back to the detachment. This enables the Detachment to operate as an independent squadron, with Captain Weaver as CO.

1st Lt Elry L Fleisher was transferred into the organization from the 42d R & R Sq, per SO 190, 1st AADA dated 23 July. He assumed the duties of Adjutant, vice 1st Lt Robert W. Boyle transferred to SHAEF. Lt Hartley became a member of the detachment in the capacity of adjutant.

Since the lull in Missions for the B-26's Line activity has slowed down to a pace. Much time is being devoted to inventory of tools and rebuilding and improving upon equipment on hand.

Morale of the men is up to par. They feel that the 40th is now almost a full grown outfit and has picked up a name for itself with the many Units on the field.

The squadron party which was held in the early days of the month proved to be a great success. It was held in Brentwood and consisted of beer, women, song and chow plus a good dance band. All look forward to another gala affair.

With election just around the corner men have taken advantage of the opportunity given them to practice their duties as citizens.

1st Lt Fleisher has been appointed Soldier Voting Officer for the Organization per squadron order 15. Meanwhile the men have been attending an orientation course on voting given by the Group S-3. Two enlisted men from the 40th are on the Group S-3 staff.

JAMES H. HYSLER, Jr
1st Lt, AC Historical Office


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1737 ###]

Auth: CG Ninth AF
Initials: 5 Sept 1944

40TH MOBILE R & R SQUADRON (Less Det "A") AAF Station 166

APO 149 US Army 5 September 1944

314.7

Unit History, August 1944

1. Organization: Negative.

2. Strength: a. Officers 6, b. Enlisted Men 125

3. Movement: Detachment "A" transferred to "Far Shore", authority not known.

4. Casualties: One, Non-Battle, 1st Lt. Mathieu T. Bistagne, injured in B-26 Plane Crash, 16 August 1944, at Friston England.

5. Decorations: Negative.

Promotions held the attention of the men again on the first of the month. The first M Sgt was appointed in addition to two S Sgts, four Sgts, two Cpl and four Pfc's.

The enlisted strength changed somewhat in the early part of the month. The Squadron lost it's medical personnel, as well as overages of two line chief's, and one cook. Additional personnel included four sheet metal workers and four hydraulic mechanics.

Five off base jobs took an equal number of Units to various parts of England; Ford, Friston, Sussex, Dunsford and Stonycross.

Battle damage and engine changes on B-26's forced down were the tasks confronting the Units that went to repair and salvage the ships.

Eleven men were afforded the advantage of going to schools during the month, Two went to 2800 advanced engine school, seven men attended airplane sheet metal school, and two participated in an orientation course.

Flight Officer Robert B. Elverman and two enlisted men were transferred to Detachment "A" to make up for a shortage of personnel necessary to complete final shipment of Detachment "A".

Orders transferring Detachment "A" called for a total of 64 enlisted men and officers, this necessitated sending one complete unit to Station 166, thus increasing the number of units from fiv. (5) to six (6) units on this field.

The most important event was receiving Alert Order No 66 dated 22 August 1944 from Ninth Air Force Headquarters placing the organization on the alert in preparation for overseas shipment. Activity really began in the organization and immediately all units began completing arrangements to have their vehicles and personnel ready to move within six (6) hours notice.

1st Lt. Robert H. Countryman, O-855267 was assigned and joined from 33rd Depot Repair Squadron per Par 1, SO 224 1st ADDA., and has been appointed Asst Engineering Officer.

JAMES H. HYSLER, Jr
1st Lt, AC Historical Office


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1739 ###]

Auth: CO, 53rd S. G.
Date: 7 Sept 44
Initials:

1176TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY, SERVICE GP (AVN)
APO 149, US Army.

6 Sept 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History

To: Group Historian, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. The following is a subsequent installment of the Unit History of this organization for the month of March 1944.

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: (As of 31 Aug 44) 2 Officers 38 EM

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. Unit Narrative:

At present this unit is accomplishing, with EM of its various sections, the task assigned them. These include the requisitioning, receiving, storage, and the issue of all food, clothing and equipment, gasoline and oil, and the laundry, dry cleaning, shoe repair, and salvage service necessary at this Station. The job Of procuring and issuing individual equipment has increased recently due to showdown inspections held within the various organizations at this station.

Pending receipt of further orders, this unit has all the equipment and supplies crated and packed in readiness for a possible move to the far shore. Members of this unit nave been trained and are prepared to set up and Operate QM installation under combat conditions which may be encountered.

DANIEL W. MAHONEY
1st Lieut., QMC,
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1740 ###]

Auth: CG 9th AAF
Date: 7th Sept 1944
Init:

HEADQUARTERS
2198TH QUARTERMASTER TRUCK COMPANY AVIATION
53rd SERVICE GROUP
APO 149, US ARMY

7th September 1944

UNIT HISTORY, for Month August 1944:

1. ORGANIZATION: Negative.

2. STRENGTH: 3 Officers, ?? Enlisted Men, 2 Enlisted Men Transferred, 2 Enlisted Men asgd and jd, 1 Officer Transferred

3. MOVEMENT: Headquarters: Negative. Det "A": AAF Sta 452 to France.

4. CASUALTIES: Negative.

5. DECORATIONS: Negative.

During month of August, Headquarters, 2198 QM Trk Co, Avn, remained at AAF Sta 166 and performed duties of a Quartermaster Truck Company attached to a Service Team of a Service Group. The vehicles hauled bombs, rations, air craft parts, personnel, and performed miscellaneous transportation duties at an AAF Station.

Det "A", 2198 QM Trk Co., Avn, consisting of 46 EM and 1 Officer moved from AAF Sta 452 to the Continent and are operating in France. From reports reaching this HQ, the men are engaged in transporting gasoline and oil, bombs, rations, air craft parts, personnel and miscellaneous transportation requirements.

Headuarters gained one truck which fills out the T/E allowance of 26 2 1/2 Ton trucks, 2 1/4 T trucks, 25 1 T cargo trailers and 1 250 gal water trailer.

PAUL S. GLICK
1st Lieut., QMC
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1741 ###]

Auth: Serv Gp CO
Date: 31 Aug 44
Init:

1052nd Signal Company (SG)
53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 31 August 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. (ATTN: Group Historian)

1. Following is the August installment of the Unit History of this organization. Changes were as follows:

a. Organization: On Special Orders Number 140 of Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 13 August 1944, the following men were transferred from the Company:

Sgt Lawrence A. Brennan 12056692 (821)

On Special Orders Number 138 of Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 8 August 1944, the following men were transferred from the Company:

T/Sgt Robert J. Brown 7060434 (647)
Sgt Eugene N. Field 37285036 (237)
Cpl Winton L. Lenz 36812440 (950)
Cpl George W. Dinger 33292992 (951)

On orders from a General Hospital the following man was transferred out of the Company:

T/5 John S. Serick 32730107 (955)

On Special Orders Number 220 of Hq, IX Air Force Service Command, dated 7 August 1944, and amended by Number 230, dated 17 August 1944, the following man was transferred to the Company:

Sgt George W. Malanger 3?151870 (?21)

Three more men were transferred to the Company, but the orders are not available at this time.

Sgt Alexander W. Wertensky 36719841 (955)
Cpl John W. Noonan 36722636 (955)
Pfc William ?. Carr 19135821 (055)

b. Strength: The Company is now one man short of its normal strength of 97 EM and three Officers.

c. Movement: The Supply and Maintenance Team "B" moved from Station 452 to the Continent during the second week of the month.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. During the second week of August the Supply and Maintenance Team "B" moved to France, though actual time of departure, details of the trip, nor the ultimate destination are known at this time. Prior to the departure Sgt Lawrence A. Brennan, who joined the Company in April of 1942, shortly after it was activated, was transferred to the 890th Signal Company Depot, Aviation. Also transferred was T/5 John Serick, who was sent to a General Hospital. Three new men joined the Team, Sgt Wartensky, Cpl Noonan, and Pfc Carr. T/4 Thomas Brennan was added to the Team to take charge of the Communications Section. Pvt Walter Brooks was to have gone with "B" Team on temporary duty but was returned to his organization, Hq & Hq Sq. T/5 Pratt took over the job of Assistant Warehouse Foreman and T/5 Hymovitz is also working in that Section. Following is a list of the Officer and 23 EM of the Team:

TEAM COMMANDER
1st Lt John M. Casson O-1643738 4400

RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
M/Sgt Malcolm D. Raines 34231859 955

ASST RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/3 Francis S. Brownell 11039851 951

AIRBORNE RADIO CHIEF
T/4 Bernard (NMI) Kastner 35220090 951

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Knowles R. Roberts 34820933 647
T/5 William E. Siebold 31354795 647

VHF RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Simon H. Snider 38329725 951

VHF RADIO REPAIRMEN
Pfc Thomas H. Conn 38434696 647

RADAR REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Robert J. Martin 46245300 955

RADAR REPAIRMEN
Sgt Alexander W. Wertensky 36719841 955
Cpl John W. Noonan 36722636 955
T/5 William C. Finley 38318823 955
T/5 Richard C. Matthews 13150898 955
T/5 Frederick A. Hofmann 13159542 955
Pfc William ?. Carr 19135821 955

WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/Sgt Frank A. Swider 33135179 581

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/5 Henry L. Pratt, Jr 38410858 835

WAREHOUSEMEN
T/5 John W. Depew 34186223 835
T/5 David S. Hymovitz 33054079 647

TEAM CLERK
T/5 Robert H. Paul 33247036 405

COMMUNICATIONS CHIEF
T/4 Thomas J. Brennan 33712143 950

COMMUNICATIONS SECTION
T/5 William W. Pinkerous 32240257 238
T/5 Robert J. Higgins 12059069 239
Pvt Walter J. Stilley 34147463 650

a. Some of the details of conditions on the Continent are as follows. The first night ashore was spent in pup tents, and then the Team was moved into barracks formally used by the Germans. It is understood that the boys are now billeted three miles from a town. All water had to be carried in, and there was no electricity in the area. The 24-75 supplies power for light for work at night.

b. The Warehouse and Repair sections are located at an open hanger with sides of earth built ?? up. Three pyramidal tents are used for Supply and also for Repair. There has been very little repair work or calls for supplies as yet. On the day after arrival of the Team MAJOR STINSON brought information on supply procedure through 2d Tactical Air Depot, and courier is run daily to his location.

c. The orderly room and switchboard room are located in one tent. The organization that moved out the day the Team arrived left their lines none of which were tagged. The linemen had a busy time salvaging what they could of this system and now have a set-up much the same as at 162.

d. A consolidated mess was formed of all the organizations but the Service Squadron which has its own. The Team supplies ??, and Sgt Wertephy is serving as a cook. The food on the Continent has been excellent.

e. The boys passed through several towns, but they were largely heaps of rubble. There are loads of anti-personnel mines about, but the roads are cleared to the hedges on both sides and are so marked. One doesn't cut through the fields - one British ack-ack gunner tried it and may lose his arm. German installations, gun emplacements, dumps, etc., are much in evidence. Ammunition is scattered all over. Some of the boys from one of the units got hold of a lot of potato mashers and grenades and were "practicing" with them, but a stop was put to this. Sgt Kastner, the collector, has more German equipment than American - gas mask, mess-kit, etc. It's really dangerous to pick up such things. One Frenchman was killed near the area when he picked up a service red cross kit.

d. For diversion the whole gang went for a swim on a Sunday at the beach - besides they needed a bath. Although the towns are out of bounds, but the boys go for a walk or bicycle ride at night.

3. The Headquarters & Maintenance Section and the S & M Team A received their Alert Order on the 25th of August, and many administrative and supply activities in preparation were accelerated. Due to the amount of work required to be ready for a move on a few hours notice other activities were limited this month. The Alert Order calls for 23 men in the Team so the personnel of the Team is as follows:

TEAM COMMANDER
2nd Lt William W. Pashwa O-1645273 500

WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
S/Sgt John J. Costello, Jr. 12034091 851

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/5 Reece B. Drinnen 34186188 835

WAREHOUSEMEN
Cpl Cecil C. Summers 18039762 405

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
Sgt William W. Casey 36171752 647

RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/Sgt Vaughn W. Gagosian 31355338 647

ASST RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Donnis E. Taylor 34395374 955

RADAR REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 George C. Lewis 39324364 955

ASST WIRE CHIEF
S/Sgt John (NMI) Fischer 37471453 261

COMMUNICATIONS SECTION
Sgt George W. Malanger 3?151870 239
Pfc Donald I. McCoy 16101404 650

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 William W. Craig 35800677 647
T/5 Aaron K. Kraft 16097032 647
Cpl Raymond N. Blair 33553738 647

VHF RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
Sgt Joseph C. Bleiler 31090438 951

VHF RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Edward E. Sheerer 33508965 951
T/5 Tolbert J. Neibich 33506232 647

RADAR REPAIRMEN
T/5 Richard M. Ramsbey 35541621 955
T/5 George M. Parker, Jr 16085397 955
T/5 Finley M. Gleason, Jr 39024227 955
Pfc Beryl R. Cullen 16127760 955
Pfc Douglas F. Daugherty 19176378 955

a. On Special Orders Number ??? of Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 22 July 1944, T/5 Richard Ramsbey went to the 875th Signal Company Depot, Aviation, at Station 479 on temporary duty to study and make conversions on British Navigational Aids. On Special Orders Number 157 of Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 6 August 1944, T/4 Blair and Craig went to Tolebury, Wiltshire, for a two week course at a British school of ???

4. The personnel of the Headquarters Section is ???:

COMPANY COMMANDER:
CAPTAIN WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR., O-469001 0210

FIRST SERGEANT:
F/Sgt Robert (NMI) Gray 35262884 585

ADM & TECH CLERK:
S/Sgt Merhl W. Sulcer 33371646 275

CLERK TYPIST:
T/4 John M. McCarty 31062428 405
T/4 Byrne W. Pike 39844307 656

SUPPLY SERGEANTS:
Sgt Jerome V. Lundblad 39280944 405
Sgt Laurel C. Howard 39831883 821

SUPPLY CLERKS:
T/5 Peter (NMI) Slata 33362208 766
Pvt Aven B. Moody 18125096 650

MOTOR TRANS NCO:
S/Sgt John J. Corsall, Jr. 12067069 813

AUTOMOBILE MECH:
T/5 Laverne J. Tiedeman 36246651 014

ARMORER:
T/5 Anton Klein 37287074 511

COOK:
T/4 Ciro M. Montuori 12191777 060
T/5 Fred (NMI) Bedross 32872058 060

COOK'S HELPER:
Pfc Lemoine C. Shaw 16024418 060

BASE DEFENSE:
Pvt Tom D. Olin 36735567 647

5. After drawing the men out of the Operations Section for the two S & M Teams the personnel left ?? follows:

WIRE CHIEF
T/Sgt Jarvis J. Phillips 16043194 950

LINEMEN & INSTALLATION REPAIRMEN
T/5 Robert A. Phelps 37493604 950

CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
T/Sgt Anthony J. Laraia 31045818 766

RADIO OPERATORS
T/4 Frank J. Squadrito 13098795 766

#
LINEMEN & INSTALLER REPAIRMEN
T/5 Keiner E. Schumaker 34178731 238
Pfc Leland (NMI) Johnson 37285804 950
Pfc Ormal P. Goodell 36554706 950
Pfc Calvin C. Hornbeck 15075230 238
Pfc Willie D. Risher 14099839 238

CHIEF TELEPHONE OPERATOR
T/5 Will T. Shiflet 38413103 238

TELEPHONE OPERATORS
Pfc Ernest F. Colbath 31114167 650
Pfc Charles L. Coley 36718896 650
Pvt Ronald W. Wood 19170878 ???

CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
S/Sgt Harold M. Bauer 37115135 237

ASST CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
Sgt Warren S. Parsons 34537736 237

TELETYPE OPERATORS
T/5 Ben T. Ware, Jr 34597673 237
Pfc Richard E. Otis 36479127 237
Pfc Howard F. Fischer 35684695 237
Pfc James G. McMahon 39186467 237
T/4 Stanley A. Szoda 32241294 237

RADIO OPERATORS
T/4 William F. Finn 31098430 766
T/5 Clifford S. Jelliff 12098430 766
T/5 Leland (NMI) Montgomery 15104546 766
Pfc Robert G. Kampert 13152313 766
Edward A. Olsen 12095760 766
Pvt Clarence C. Rankin, Jr 33301555 766

MESSAGE CENTER CHIEF
S/Sgt Raymond (NMI) Perry 34178024 667

ASST MESSAGE CENTER CHIEFS
Sgt Florience R. Dicke, Jr 35336466 667
Sgt Floyd H. VanGuilder 31114163 667

MESSAGE CENTER CLERKS
T/5 Edward J. Doyle 11088302 667
T/5 Meyer S. Finkelstein 12082078 667
Pvt Samuel (NMI) Ben 12096566 667
Pvt Kenneth H. Lincoln 12207730 667

MOTOR MESSENGERS
Pfc Willard M. Austin 12066999 590
Pfc James L. Drinnen 34186258 590

a. This division of personnel complies with the specification of our Alerter order, Number 66 of Hq, Ninth Air Force SC, dated 22 August 1944, a copy of which is appended, which specifies 23 men in the Team and 53 in headquarters.

b. Administrative activities of th emonth were largely the usual routine duties and the myriad of details necessary in preparation for overseas movement. One special activity was a Company meeting in which besides the usual discussion of activities, reading of the Company History, and orientation lecture. A British training film called "Fighters All" on Airdrome Defense was shown and CAPTAIN RIECK, acting in the capacity of unit voting officer, gave an explanation of voting procedure. This was followed up by a check to make sure each man understood the regulation in his state and had the opportunity to make an application for ballot. Pfc Kampert was designated the unit instructor in aircraft recognition and was sent to school, ???, Southport, Lancashire.

5. The chief social activity for the month was a party and dance for the Headquarters and Operations Sections and Team ?. Most of the girls were from the Women's Land Army. The party featured food and beer this time and refreshments prepared by the cooks. It was held in a dance hall in Harlow, and the civilian staff complemented the boys on their courtesy and good behavior.

6. The Company had a celebrity in its area this month, ??list Billy Conn. He received a haircut from the Company barber, T/5 Peter Slata, who became so flustered he almost short changed Conn ten shillings.

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1747 ###]

HEADQUARTERS
NINTH AIR FORCE COMMAND

APO 696, US Army.
22 August 1944

COPY NO. 140

SUBJECT: Alert Order No. 66

TO: Commanding General, IX Air Force Service Command, APO 149, US Army. (By Special Handling)

1. The following listed units of your command are alerted effective this date, in preparation for movement to the successive stages of mounting for an overseas shipment. It is improbable that personnel or vehicles will return to original station:

List Index NumberUnitSerial NumberStationPersVehLong Tons
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO SERVICE TEAM CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
2549b14 Sv Gp, Hq & Hq Sq, Less Dets52038Wethersfield, Essex163268.0
2549b21112 Sig Co Sv Gp, Hq & Opns Plat, Less Det “A”52131Wethersfield, Essex539
2549b346 Mob R&R Sq, Hq & 1 Unit51926Little Walden, Essex6721
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO 4TH SERVICE GROUP CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
2550b1484 Service Sq52006Wethersfield, Essex2455927.0
2550b21781 Ord S&M Co52168Wethersfield, Essex8026
2550b346 Mob R&R Sq, 4 Units Det A51926Wethersfield, Essex6424
2550b41179 QM Co Sv Gp, Less Det “A”52121Wethersfield, Essex412
2550b52250 QM Trk Co Avn, Less Det “A”52914Wethersfield, Essex5354
2550b61112 Sig Co Sv Gp, S&M Plat Less Det “A”52131Wethersfield, Essex234
2554b868 Chem Co ?.?51520Wethersfield, Essex60238.0
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO DEPOT GROUP CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
4633b7 Air Dep Gp, Hq & Hq Sq50068Membury, Berks17733200.0
4634b7 Depot Supply Sq51568Membury, Berks1316
4635b7 Depot Repair Sq50069Membury, Berks34053
4636b1454 Ord MM Co Avn Q52411Membury, Berks4812
4637b444 QM Plat Ad Gp50632Membury, Berks249
4638b2205 QM Trk Co Avn52270Membury, Berks104107
4639b10 (US) Med Sup Plat50110Membury, Berks213
4640b878 Sig Co Dep Avn, Less Dets52300Membury, Berks18932
4641b314 Air Trans Sq51472Grove, Berks28320.0
4642b21 Wea Sq, Det ZT50159Membury, Berks1450.0
3937b1894 QM Trk Co Avn50831Ashdown Park, Berks1041070.0
4393b22 Mob R&R Sq51480Membury, Berks195720.0
4643b322 Sta Comp Sq52239Membury, Berks1181312.0
4644b41 Mobile R&R Sq51958Grove, Berks195710.0
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO SERVICE TEAM CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
2603b130 Sv Gp, Hq & Hq Sq, Less Dets52143Chelgrove, Oxon163268.9
2603b21106 Sig Co Sv Gp, Hq & Opns Plat52136Chelgrove, Oxon539
2603b349 Mob R&R Sq, Hq & Opns Plat Less “A”51924Chelgrove, Oxon6721
4645b31 Air Transport Group, Hq & Hq Sq51470Chelgrove, Oxon2316
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO 30TH SERVICE GROUP, SERVICE TEAM “B” CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
2658b1494 Service Sq52171Gosfield, Essex2455927.0
2658b21569 Ord S&M Co52134Gosfield, Essex8026
2658b349 Mob R&R Sq, 4 Units Det A51924Gosfield, Essex6424
2658b41078 QM Co Sv Gp, Det “A”52176Gosfield, Essex412
2658b52251 QM Trk Co Avn, Less Det “A”52915Gosfield, Essex4953
2658b61106 Sig Co Sv Gp, S&M Plat Det “A”52136Gosfield, Essex245
2662b868 Cml Co, Det “B”51520Gosfield, Essex3198.0
4646b326 Ferrying Sq51964Gosfield, Essex26220.0
4675b315 Air Transport Sq51473Gosfield, Essex28230.0
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO DEPOT GROUP CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
3131b43 Air Dep Gp, Hq & Hq Sq50262Grove, Berks17733260.0
3132b43 Depot Supply Sq50241Grove, Berks13146
3133b43 Depot Repair Sq50240Grove, Berks34054
3134b43 Depot Repair Sq, Det Mob Oxy Unit50240Grove, Berks166
3135b443 QM Plat Ad Gp50631Grove, Berks243
3136b896 Sig Co Dep Avn, Less Dets A & B50693Grove, Berks18932
3137b1764 Ord MM Co Avn Q50887Grove, Berks4812
3138b2255 QM Trk Co Avn52919Grove, Berks104107
4839b37 (US) Med Sup Plat50208Grove, Berks213
3128b1255 MP Co Avn, Less Det “A”50803Grove, Berks524
3140b21 Wea Sq, Det Xi50159Grove, Berks125
4648b99 Sta Comp Sq, Det “A”51663Grove, Berks505
35168240 Mob Comm Sq, Det “N”50255Grove, Berks124
4649b767 Cml Sep Co51883Grovely Wood, Wilts82140.0
4650b2044 QM Trk Plat52963Ashdown Park, Berks51510.0
4651b2047 QM Trk Co, Less 1 Platoon52962Ashdown Park, Berks53560.0
4652b2047 QM Trk Platoon52962Ashdown Park, Berks51510.0
4653b2044 QM Trk Co, Less 1 Platoon52963Ashdown Park, Berks53560.0
4053b1513 QM Bn (Mob), Hq & Hq Det, W/Med Det50827Ashdown Park, Berks2760.0
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO 70TH SERVICE GROUP, SERVICE TEAM “B” CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
4654b76 Service Sq50323Gt. Dunmow, Essex2455927.0
4655b1769 Ord S&M Co50890Gt. Dunmow, Essex8026
4656b39 Mob R&R Sq, 4 Units Det A51496Gt. Dunmow, Essex6424
4657b1054 QM Co Sv Gp, Det “A”50734Gt. Dunmow, Essex412
4658b2196 QM Trk Co Avn, Det “A”51887Gt. Dunmow, Essex5354
4659b1087 Sig Co Sv Gp, S&M Plat Det “A”50751Gt. Dunmow, Essex234
4660b808 Cml Co, Det “B”50662Gt. Dunmow, Essex67218.0
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO 42ND SERVICE GROUP, TEAM “A” CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
4664b361 Service Sq50237Andrews Field, Essex24559
4665b1642 Ord S&M Co50855Andrews Field, Essex8026
4666b28 Mob R&R Sq, 4 Units Less Det A51486Andrews Field, Essex6424
4667b1136 QM Co Sv Gp, Less Det “A”50774Andrews Field, Essex412
4668b2253 QM Trk Co Avn, Less Det “A”52917Andrews Field, Essex5354
4669b1020 Sig Co Sv Gp, S&M Plat Less Det “A”51825Andrews Field, Essex234
4670b819 Cml Co A/O, Less Det “A”51973Andrews Field, Essex6721
3512b1925 Ord Amm Co51912Grovely Wood, Wilts18618
4671b50 Mob Trng Unit53081Grove, Berks94
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO 42ND SERVICE GROUP, TEAM “B” CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
4672b74 Service Sq50978Stansted, Essex2455927.0
4673b1815 Ord S&M Co50906Stansted, Essex8026
4674b28 Mob R&R Sq, 4 Units Det A51486Stansted, Essex6424
4675b1136 QM Co Sv Gp, Det “A”50774Stansted, Essex412
4676b2253 QM Trk Co Avn, Det “A”52917Stansted, Essex5354
4677b1020 Sig Co Sv Gp, S&M Plat Det “A”51825Stansted, Essex234
4678b819 Cml Co A/O, Det “A”51973Stansted, Essex6720
3803b2004 Ord Maint Co Af51833Stansted, Essex22667
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO SERVICE TEAM CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
4679b53 Sv Gp, Hq & Hq Sq50282Matching, Essex164268.0
4680b1052 Sig Co Sv Gp, Hq & Opns Plat52119Matching, Essex5390.0
4681b40 Mob R&R Sq, Hq & 1 Unit51497Matching, Essex67210.0
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO 53RD SERVICE GROUP CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
4682b87 Service Sq50284Matching, Essex2455927.0
4683b1589 Ord S&M Co50848Matching, Essex8026
4684b40 Mob R&R Sq, 4 Units Less Det A51497Matching, Essex6424
4685b1176 QM Co Sv Gp, Less Det “A”51828Matching, Essex412
4686b2198 QM Trk Co Avn, Less Det “A”52212Matching, Essex5954
4687b1052 Sig Co Sv Gp, S&M Plat Less Det “A”52119Matching, Essex234
4688b873 Cml Co A/O, Less Det “A”50674Matching, Essex67218.0
4690b2016 QM Trk Co Avn50845Grovely Wood, Wilts1041070.0
4691b1950 QM Trk Co, Less 1 Platoon50843Bures, Essex53560.0
4692b1966 QM Trk Co Avn50844Bures, Essex1041070.0
4693b1950 QM Trk Plat50843Bures, Essex51510.0
4694bIX Air Force Service Command, Hq & Hq Sq51557Sunninghill, Berks533900.0
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO DEPOT GROUP CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
4695b30 Air Dep Gp, Hq & Hq Sq50184Stansted, Essex17733280.0
4696b30 Depot Supply Sq50186Stansted, Essex13146
4697b30 Depot Repair Sq50185Stansted, Essex34053
4698b30 Depot Repair Sq, Mob Oxy Gen Unit Det A50185Grove, Berks166
4699b1605 Ord MM Co Avn Q50849Stansted, Essex4812
4700b430 QM Plat Ad Gp50619Stansted, Essex243
4701b2206 QM Trk Co Avn52269Stansted, Essex104107
4702b909 Sig Dep Co Avn, Less Dets A, B, & C50699Stansted, Essex8917
4703b919 Sig Dep Co AvnStansted, Essex18932
4704b1957 Ord Dep Co51790Stansted, Essex18628
4705b303 Sta Comp Sq51894Stansted, Essex11813
4706b1256 MP Co Avn, Less Det “A”50804Stansted, Essex524
4707b2012 Engr Avn Ff Plat51397Grove, Berks239
4708b36 (US) Med Sup Plat51811Stansted, Essex212
4709b1 Mob Photo Sup & Maint Unit (Prov)34495Stansted, Essex4980.0
4710b21 Wea Sq, Det “C”50159Stansted, Essex1450.0
4711bIX Air Force Service Command, Hq & Hq Sq, Det “A”51500Stansted, Essex1770.0
4712b755 Cml Dep Co Avn, Cld50565Cinderford82140.0
4713b759 Cml Dep Co Avn50657Cinderford82140.0
4714b2108 Ord Amm Bn Avn, Sp51714Bures, Essex6164.0
4715b1928 Ord Amm Co52468Bures, Essex186186.0
4118b2028 QM Trk Co Avn52964Grovely Wood, Wilts1041070.0
4716b47 Mob R&R Sq51928Stansted, Essex195710.0
4717b1 Adv Air Dep Area, Hq & Hq Sq, “B” Ech52464Haseley Ct., Oxon2234040.0
4718b320 Sig Co Wg, Less Det “A”50485Haseley Ct., Oxon4411
4719b1366 MP Co Avn, Less Det “A”52197Haseley Ct., Oxon524
4720b42 Mob R&R Sq51949Grove, Berks19571
ALLOCATION OF TONNAGE TO DEPOT GROUP CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING UNITS:
4721b45 Air Dep Gp, Hq & Hq Sq50259Grove, Berks17733280.0
4722b45 Depot Supply Sq50261Grove, Berks13146
4723b45 Depot Repair Sq50260Grove, Berks34054
4724b45 Depot Repair Sq, Det “A”50260Grove, Berks166
4725b1824 Ord MM Co Avn Q50910Grove, Berks4812
4726b445 QM Plat Ad Gp50633Grove, Berks243
4727b2256 QM Trk Co Avn52920Grove, Berks104107
4728b890 Sig Co Dep Avn, Less Det B & C51669Grove, Berks18932
4729b99 Sta Comp Sq, Less Det “A”51633Grove, Berks68810.0
4730b100 Sta Comp Sq51667Grove, Berks1061312.0
3128b1255 MP Co Avn50803Grove, Berks5243.0
4731b1 Adv Air Dep Area, “C” Ech53464Grove, Berks4910
4734b13 Rcd51600Bishopstrow, Wilts13524
4732b2019 QM Trk Co Avn50846Tostock, Suffolk104107
4733b1516 QM Trk Bn, W/Med Det50842Tostock, Suffolk279
4735b24 (US) Vet Sect Avn52220Sunninghill, Berks31
4736b25 (US) Vet Sect Avn52366Sunninghill, Berks31
4737b26 (US) Vet Sect Avn52367Sunninghill, Berks31
4738b33 Mobile R&R Sq51491Crookham Common, Kent19571
4739b34 Mobile R&R Sq51492Grove, Berks2217
4740b26 Mobile R&R Sq51484Crookham Common, Kent19571
4741b149 Army Postal Unit32788Sunninghill, Berks121
4742b591 Army Postal Unit32271Bishopstrow, Wilts121
4829b318 Sta Comp Sq52208Grove, Berks10613
4743b814 Cml Co A/O51965Headcorn, Kent134418.0
4744b859 Cml Co A/O52129Bures, Essex134418.0

[NOTE: The following pages (1752 thru 1760) were not transcribed as they contain detailed instructions for the movement.]


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1761 ###]

AUTH: CO IX AF
Date: 7 Sept 1944
Initials:

COMPANY HISTORY of the 873RD CHEMICAL COMPANY, AIR OPERATIONS (H or M)

1 August 1944 to 31 August 1944

Organization: Negative.

Strength: As of 31 August, 1944, the strength of this organization was four (4) Officers and one hundred and twenty nine (129) Enlisted Men.

Decorations: Under the provisions of AR 600-68, 4 May, 1943 and Memorandum No. 35-18, Hq, Ninth Air Force, dated 20 December, 1943, the following named EM of this organization were awarded the Good Conduct Medal:

T/5 Albion E. Michaud 31253327 (766)
Pfc Homer D. Clark 38211952 (345)
Pfc Lionel E. Sabourin 31170380 (590)
Pfc Kenneth Zaleski 32547891 (345)
Pfc Melvin Allen 14182670 (786)
Pfc Arthur B. Knoolock 31164770 (835)
Pfc Patsy J. Trovstore 35541187 (345)
Pvt Walter A. Krol 16087322 (786)
Pvt Harry N. Neihaus 12157391 (786)

Casualties: Negative.

Movement: Detachment "A" of this organization moved from AAF Station 452 to the Continent during the second week of the month. Two (2) Officers and sixty fiv. (65) Enlisted Men made the trip.

I. During the second week of the month, detachment "A" of this organization moved to France. The actual time of departure, details of the trip and the exact destination are not yet known. Only a few details of conditions on the Continent are known, Some of them are as follows:

4. The men slept in pup tents when the first went ashore but have since moved into permanent living quarters which were used by German troops not long ago.

b. Water is rather scarce and there are no lighting facilities.

c. Team "B", with the exception of the 53rd Service Squadron, have set up a consolidated mess.

d. Many of the men were able to go for a swim recently. It was the first bath they had had for several weeks.

II. The Headquarters Section of this unit became alerted on Alert Order No 66, Headquarters, Ninth Air Force (Rear), dated 22 August, 1944. The unit performed the following duties in compliance with these orders:

a. Showdown inspections of clothing and equipment were made and all shortages were replaced.

b. Showdown Requisitions were submitted on all T/E Equipment that was not on hand.

c. The 28th Article of War was read and explained to all personnel.

d. Excess Station property, such as extra blankets, stoves, buckets ans extra tentage, were turned in to the Custodial Officer.

e. All equipment was loaded on trucks and trailers to determine the weight, measurement and shipping lists, Necessary forms were completed and turned in.

f. An inspection was made of all records and files of this unit by the Air inspector of the Ninth Air Force. All descrepancies have been corrected.

g. All members of the organization went through the gas chamber.

III. A company meeting was held and Lt. Robert H. Gray, our Voting Officer, gave a talk on "Requirements for Soldier Voting’. Many men of this company have sent in request for absentee ballots.

Plans for a company party were also discussed at this meeting. It was decided that we have the party in September to celebrate our first year in the ETO.

IV. All regular camp duties, including the Handling of Chemical Ammunition, Ordnance Ammunition and assisting of loading planes for bombing missions, were also accomplished during the month.

For the Commanding Officer:

ROBERT H. GRAY
1st. Lt., CWS,
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1763 ###]

Auth: CO, Sta 166
Date: 4 September 1944
Init:

COMPANY HISTORY of the 1589TH ORDNANCE SUPPLY & MAINTENANCE CO (AVN)

1 August 1944 to 31 August 1944

Organization - Negative.

Strength - As of 51 August 1944, the strength of the organization was four Officers and seventy-three Enlisted Men.

Movement - Negative.

Casualties - Negative.

Decorations - Negative.

The 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn) performed its usual operational duties during the first twenty-one days of August, 1944.

Receipt of Alert Order Nos 66, Hq, Ninth Air Force (Rear) dated 22 August 1944 started a flurry of activity within the organizations. In addition to its regular operational duties each section took upon itself the added responsibility of stripping of all extraneous equipment.

Equipment which had been drawn on MR was turned in; stoves, blankets, chairs, and a multitude of other items which were not to be shipped with the organization to the Far Shore.

The Headquarters Supply Section and the Ordnance Supply Section were kept especially busy during the latter part of the month.

The job of preparing and marking shipping crates for all organizational equipment was completed by the Headquarters Supply Section. All radios, as well as overcoats and mackinaws were turned in to this section. Three showdown inspections were held and all shortages of personal equipment and clothing were filled.

The Ordnance Supply Section had the double task of supplying all units on the base with their shortages of Ordnance equipment and of picking up, transporting, recording and crating their 30-day stock level of Ordnance items.

As of the 31st of August, 1944, this organization was prepared to depart from this station for the Far Shore on 8-hour notice.

During the month of August, 1944, this organization had its administrative records examined by the IGD. All administrative records were found to be in "Excellent" condition


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1765 ###]

Auth: CO, Sta 162
Date: 6 June 1944
Init:

1812th ORDNANCE SUPPLY & MAINTENANCE Co. (AVN)
Office of the Company Commander
Service Team "B", 53rd Service Group

APO 149, U.S. Army 6 June 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History.

TO : Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, U. S. Army. THRU: Commanding Officer, Service Team "B", 53rd Service Group.

1. In compliance with paragraph 3, letter, Hq 53rd Service Group, dated 23 January 1944, subject "Unit Histories", the following report is submitted:

A. Organizational: Negative.

B. Strength: 31 May 1944 - 77 EM, 3 Officers.

C. Date of arrival or departure of Station: Negative.

D. Awards to & Decorations of Members: Negative.

2. The month of May has been an exceptionally busy month for us. Practically all Sections have had a record month of activity. As we look back upon it we can take justifyable pride in our accomplishments.

A. Lt. Wardell joined the organization the early part of the month and being assigned Ammunition Officer, fell into a real hot bed of activity. His initiative and organizational ability in addition to his friendly and cooperative spirit made him truely a valuable asset to the organization. His subsequent transfer out of the outfit, the latter part of the month, has disappointed the entire company.

Be The Automotive Section, under Lt. Sandals, has, in con- junction with the Supply Section under Lt. Silesky, accomplished what we had long thought to be an impossibility on this base, namely, bringing the deadline vehicle report to show less than ten vehicles. Supply did a noteworthly job in getting parts required to keep 'em rolling and the use of the Automotive Shop used ability and ingenuity in accomplishing this success. We are going to try hard to keep it this way.

C. The supply of ordnance organizational equipment on this field will soon be a moot question inasmuch as practically all major requirements have been filled. The recent arrival of Capt. Bettinger as Service Team S-4 Officer and Lt. McGovern as Service Team Ordnanc. Officer has aided the supply situation materially.

MICHAEL B. HEINDL
Capt, Ord Dept.
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1766 ###]

Auth: CO, 1ST AADA (ADV)
Date: 21 Sept. 1944
Init:

HEADQUARTERS 1918TH ORDNANCE AMMUNITION COMPANY, AVN

APO 149, US Army 4 September 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History. TO: Historical Officer, Hq 1st Advanced Air Depot Area (Advanced), APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with Memorandum 20-10, Hq IX Air Force Servic. Command, the following report is submitted.

A. ORGANIZATION: Negative.

B. STRENGTH: 179 EM, 8 Officers.

C. MOVEMENT: (1) Departed AAF Sta 328, Bures, at 1000 Hours, 18 Aug 1944. Arrived Camp C-21 (Marshalling Area at Southampton, England) at 2030 Hours.

(2) Departed Camp C-21 at 1230 Hours, 22 Aug 1944 and boarded "Empire Javelin" Troopship at 1800 Hours.

(3) Empire Javelin weighed anchor at 0220 Hours, 23 Aug 1944, arrived Utah Beach-head, and we debarked at 1500 Hours, 23 Aug 1944. We marched inland under pack to bivouac at Beauville, or Ste. Vere Eglise - arrived 2030 Hours.

(4) On unloading, the Vehicle Party the ship's lifting apparatus failed and one prime move and tractor crane were dropped some forty feet over the side onto a barge. Both vehicles were smashed beyond repair. This places us temporarily in an awkward position.

D. CASUALTIES: Negative.

E. DECORATIONS: Negative.

F. OPERATIONS AND ACTIVITY: On arrival at the transit area, we learned that we would take over the operation of Utah, Air Forces Ammunition Dump from the 1907th Ord Am Co, Avn, of the 2109th Ord Am Bn (Avn) Sp.

Our first few days with the 1907th were spent in sorting out small arms ammunition by lot number and proper stacking according to regulations.

The 1520th Trk Bn was in a state of movement and transportation was very meagre. When the trucks finally did move it was decided that 2nd AADA would send trucks only for ammunition to go forward to Fighter Command, and if Bomber Command Stations needed Ammunition badly enough they would send their own transportation.

Electric current for the Mess Hall and Ammunition Office became a serious problem. So far our attempts to procure a generator have Seen unsuccessful but we are still trying.

G. RECOMMENDATIONS: It is recommended that a T/E for Air Force Ammunition Company be brought up to date and published. At present the only authorization for equipment is in TB/A # 9, dated 1 Sep 1941. Furthermore, said TB/A is for ground forces Ammunition which is handled quite differently than Air Forces Ammunition; the main difference being in the use of mechanical equipment.

CHARLES W. WRIGHT,
Capt., Ord. Dept.,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1771 ###]

Auth: CO, Team B
Date: 5 Sept 44

1812th ORDNANCE SUPPLY & MAINTENANCE Co. (AVN)
Office of the Company Commander Team "B", 53rd Service Group APO 149, U.S. Army

5 September 1944 SUBJECT; Unit History.

TO : Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, U. S. Army. THRU: Commanding Officer, Team "B", 53rd Service Group.

1. In compliance with paragraph 3, letter Headquarters, 53rd Servic. Group, subject same as above, dated 23 January 1944, the following report is submitted:

A. Organizational: Negative.

B. Strength: 31 August 1944 - 4 Officers, 76 Enlisted Men.

C. Date of arrival or departure of Station: 19 August 1944 the organization moved from AAF Station 452 enroute to France, 23 August 1944 organization arrived in France.

D. Awards to & Decorations of Members: Negative.

2. The month of August was a truely eventful one for our company. On 11 August 1944, Headquarters 9th Air Force cut orders alerting us for movement overseas and on 19 August 1944 the entire unit departed AAF Station 452 enroute to a martialing area, RCRP, C-5, for a permanent change of station. The unit was divided into two sections, a marching party and a vehicle party; the former in charge of Capt Heindl, the latter in charge of Lt Sandals. The vehicle party departed Station 452 at 0945, 19 August 1944. The marching party was to have left at 0800 but due to difficulties in securing transportation, it was necessary to wait until 1050 before the party got underway. Needless to say, it was raining at the time.

3. Both the vehicle party and the marching party proceeded to RCRP, C-5 arriving there at 1200 hours and 1230 hours respectively. While there, landing rations were issued. Recreation was provided in the form of movies and games.

4. The Vehicle Party, composed of two officers and twenty eight enlisted men were alerted and departed RCRP, C-5 at 0600 hours, 20 August 1944, enroute to POE. The Marching Party, composed of two officers and forty eight enlisted men were alerted and departed RCRP, C-5 at 1500 hours, 21 August 1944 by motor convoy enroute to POE. Troops were embarked at 1630 hours, 21 August 1944, for destination in France. Accommodations for troops were meager and almost thirty hours were spent laying at anchor in Southampton awaiting orders to move. The trip across the channel was made at night and the French coast could be seen at daylight.

5. The Marching Party disembarked at 1400 hours, 23 August 1944 at Utah Beach, France and proceeded on foot to Transit Area B, Site #30. This site was operated by the 9th Air Force. Upon arriving at the site, tents were pitched and men were issued K rations. The Vehicle Party did not disembark in a body. The last vehicle disembarked at Utah Beach, France at approximately 1200 hours, 26 August 1944.

6. The Marching Party departed Transit Area B, Site #30, Utah Beach at 1015 hours, 25 August 1944 and arrived at our destination, Strip #15, Maupertus, France, at 1200 hours. The Vehicle Party was intact at Strip #15 on 26 August 1944.

7. Living conditions were found to be better than expected. There was more than an ample amount of buildings and hard stands to meet operational requirements. The company is operating its own mess for the first time in its history and all personnel of the organization are very well pleased with it.

8. Operations during the past month have been very slow due to the fact that the tactical situation did not call for it and also because both the tactical and the service groups were in the process of moving to a new location.

MICHAEL B. HEINDL
Capt., Ord. Dept.,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1773 ###]

AUTH: CO Sta 162
Date: 5 June 1944
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE SQUADRON
Office of the Commanding Officer

APO 149, US Army 5 June 1944

In reply refer to: 300.6

SUBJECT: Unit History

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with letter, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army, dated 23 January 1944, subject, Unit Histories, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: None.

b. Strength: O-7, WO-1, EM-215.

c. Movement: None.

d. Casualties: None.

e. Decorations: None.

2. Organization performing 3rd Echelon Maintenance on B26s for the 387th Bombardment Group (M).

IRWIN L. UNGERLEIDER
Capt., Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1776 ###]

AUTH: CO Team "B"
Date: 5 Sept 1944
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE SQUADRON
Office of the Commanding Officer

APO 149, US Army 5 September 1944

In reply refer to: 314.7

SUBJECT: Unit History

TO: Commanding Officer, 1st Advanced Air Depot (Advanced), IX Air Forc. Service Command, APO 149, U. S. Army.

1. In compliance with letter, your Headquarters, dated 1 September 1944, subject and file number same as above, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: No Change.

b. Strength: O-7, WO-1, EM-229.

c. Movement: In accordance with letter, Headquarters, IX Air Force Servic. Command, dated 15 August 1944, subject, Movement Warning Order, the Marching Party and Vehicle Party of this organization departed AAF Station 452 (Stoney Cross, Hants County, England) on the morning of 19 August 1944 for Strip A-15 (Maupertus, Manch. County, France). The Marching Party arrived at Strip A-15 on 25 August 1944. One section of the Vehicle Party arrived or 29 August 1944, and the other section arrived on 30 August 1944.

d. Casualties: At 1237 hours, 23 August 1944, the U.S., SS Louis Kossuth, boat on which Vehicle Party was travelling, was hit by Accoustic Mine. Cpl. John E. Lachette, Jr., 13024525 and Pvt. Walter R. Bruce, 34086320 were slightly injured.

e. Decorations: None.

2. Organization performing 3rd Echelon Maintenance on B26s for the 387th Bombardment Group (M).

IRWIN L. UNGERLEIDER
Capt., Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1780 ###]

Auth: Memo 20-10 IX AFSC
Date: 1 July 1944
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP
APO 149 US ARMY

30 June 1944

SUBJECT: Monthly Installment of Unit History

To: Group Historical Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with memorandum, Hqs, IX Air Force Service Command, No. 20-10, dated 5 February 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 28 Officers and 130 Enlisted Men.

c. Movement: 26 Officers and 120 Enlisted Men moved from AAF Station #166, Matching, Essex, to Far Shore, Roye/Amy, Strip A-73.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. A short narrative of the part played in the war by this prganization.

a. Squadron Party - On September 9th Headquarters Squadron held it's second party in the E.T.O. and any existing doubts about surpassing their first get-together were quickly dispelled as the GIs and their guests arrived at Hutton School Hall in Shenfield and proceeded to take over for on evening that will long be remembered after the war has been won and we are concerned with the problems of winning the peace. With plenty of refreshments, beer and Coca Cola, with the superb music of Tommy Harmon's dance band and with the consciousness that the "far shore" was beckoning, everybody was determined to make the most of the occasion. Some of the boys proudly introduced their new brides to the gang, others "showed off" their latest heart interests while the regular Liberty Run commuters stuck a little closer to their "steady gals" and all joined in to make the Squadron's farewell to England a memorable one. Our officer guests included Lt Col Harry D. Stone, Group Executive Officer, Captain James L. Tucker, Squadron Commander, 1st Lt Robert M. Lick, Squadron Adjutant and 1st Lt Paul S. Wexler, Group Special Service Officer. For the second time we ere indebted to our English friends who kindly placed Hutton Hall at our disposal and we acknowledge our everlasting gratitude to the committees who worked out party plans and arrangements to perfection. After all of the superlatives have been used up, it remains only to say that "one swell time was had by all".

b. Movement - Working day by day in an atmosphere of expectancy, the degree of excitement that prevailed after alert orders were received, reached it's highest pitch when Captain Everhard, our Commanding Officer, called a formation at 2100 hours on September 22nd to announce that with the exception of a Motor Convoy, the entire Squadron was moving to France by Air in our own B26 bombers augmented by C-47s of Air Transport Command. The first wave comprising the advance party was immediately alerted and briefed for movement at 0600 hours on the morning of September 23rd, and at 1000 hours on the same day took off from Station 166, Matching, Essex, and was winging it's way over the British countryside toward the Channel and the coast of France. Like all movements by Air, ours was subject to weather conditions and two planes of the first formation returned to Matching where the men spent the night in the hangar together with the personnel of the second wave who had already taken up their advance positions for transport. On the morning of September 24th, the weather men again made some ugly faces but relented somewhat toward mid-day and both the remainder of the first echelon and the entire second wave took to the skies and set down on Air Strip A-73 at Amy in France to join those hardy pioneers who managed to put their feet on the ground after their original take-off and who, likewise, spent their first night on French soil in a strictly "air conditioned" hangar. As one of the boys remarked, life in Headquarters Squadron had become "just one hangar after another". By the morning of Monday, September 25th, the weather man had become really "browned off" and made it clear that no one would enjoy the freedom of the airways for the rest of the day. The intervening time was put to a variety of uses as last minute check-ups of the Motor Convoy were made, clean-up details were arranged and the final monetary possessions of the boys were casually tossed away in games of chance which ranged from coin flips through the more scientific game of Black Jack to the ultimate of all gamblers' delight, draw poker. Tuesday morning, September 26th, broke clear and sunny and the third and final wave bade farewell to the convoy drivers, moved on to the flying field and "took to the air" at 1300 hours that afternoon under ideal flying condition. In exactly one hour and ten minutes the last formation landed on Strip 73 and was robustly and roundly cheered by the "Veterans" of France who had already discovered how cold it can be in a three-sided building with the roof missing, how disconcerting it is to discover a beautiful French girl and be tongue tied at the same time, and how sustaining and altogether distasteful K rations can become as a steady diet. For many of the boys the movement provided their first trip by air and the exchange of first impressions ran the gamut of all experiences encountered by beginners. Some were awed by the beauty of the English countryside and we suspect that more than one GI looked "long and longingly" as the minutes ticked by and their plane carried them farther from Brentwood, Chelmsford, Ilford, Ongar and those many other places which had come to be a second home where there was always a welcome and hospitality in abundance. Others were thrilled by the sense of power and magnitude that belong to those rho ride the sky ways. And, of course, a few had "the misery" which comes when the stomach tries to "muscle in" on the chest and were grateful for the spaciousness on the inside of the helmet which is known to have a multiplicity of uses. After an informal bull session during which the past strategies of the West Wall campaign were irrevocably settled, until they crop up again, we proceeded to the peaceful little village of Beauvraignes to take up quarters in an abandoned German rest camp and to await the arrival of our Motor Convoy which was reported well on it's way beyond the coastal beach-heads. Perhaps the most universal impression that resulted from our trip by air was the thoroughness of our bomber personnel who travelled that same route and many other routes to France day by day through flak infested skies-and the pride each men felt in being in same measure a part of the Flight for Freedom that has helped to give France back to Her People again. Now truly, we understand the warmth and sincerity of those who say "Monsieur" and smile at us so disarmingly. We close this chapter with our heartfelt thanks to the flying personnel of our own Marauders and to the men of Air Transport Command who brought us safely through the France where we look for greater opportunities to do our share in the days to come.

c. Captain John A. Everhard was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron 7 September 1944 and became our new Squadron Commander.

3. This unit is at the present time stationed at Strip A-73, Roye/any, with Team "A" of the 53rd Service Group. Three (3) Officers and ten (1) enlisted men of this unit are with Team "B" of the 53rd Service Group at Strip A-39.

JOHN A. EVERHARD,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1783 ###]

AUTH: CO IX AF
Date: 5 Oct 1944
Initials:

COMPANY HISTORY of the 873RD CHEMICAL COMPANY, AIR OPERATIONS (H or M)

1 September 1944 to 30 September 1944

Organization: Negative.

Strength: As of 30 September, 1944, the strength of this organization was four (4) Officers and one hundred and thirty (130) Enlisted Men.

Decorations: Negative.

Casualties: Negative.

Movement: The headquarters detachment of this unit moved from AAF Station 166, Matching, Essex, England to Strip A-73, Roye/Amy, France. Two (2) Officers and sixty four (64) Enlisted en made the trip.

1. During the latter part of the month, the Hq. Detachment of this organization moved from AAF Station 166, Matching Green, Essex to Strip A-73, Roye/ Amy, France. One (1) Officer and thirty nine (39) Enlisted men made this move in Military Aircraft, some flying in B-26 Marauder bombers and some in C-47 Transport planes. Some of our organizational equipment was also flown to the Continent, including tentage, mess equipment and housekeeping equipment.

On the 23rd of the month, one (1) Officer and nineteen (19) Enlisted Men left AAF Station 166 at 1300 hours in B-26 Marauders enroute to Strip A-73. Weather conditions over the Continent, however, were very poor and only one of the planes carrying personnel from this organization was able to land. The rest of the men had to fly back to AAF Station 166 and wait until the following day. Those who succeeded in landing at Strip A-73 are:

Captain John J. O'Hara
T/4th Robert H. Bennigan
T/5th George J. Koellner
T/5th Henry J. Savoi.
T/5th John J. Zeis
Pfc Paul G. Neblett
Pfc Archie L. Null

Those who made the trip but had to return to AAF Station 166 because of adverse weather conditions are:

S/Sgt. Alfred A. Cataloni
Cpl. Jdward J. Woloszynski
T/5th Herman Yoselovitz
Pfc Arthur B. Knoblock
Pvt. James Connolly
Pvt. James R. Cobl.
Pvt. Gerald R. Kelly
Cpl. Austin R. Rowsey
Pyt. James O. Eaton
Pvt. Victor S. Medling
Pvt. Howard R. Porter
Pvt. Melvin A. Smith
Pvt. William T. Wilson

The men described the trip as being very rough and several of them were rather ill before the trip was over. Pfc Archie L. Null, who had never been in a plane before, was sick from take off to landing. On arriving at Strip A-73 and getting his feet on the good earth again he was heard saying , "never again".

Captain O'Hare and the six (6) Enlisted Men who landed with him spent the first night in the large, open hangar on the airfield. It was a cold, rainy and windy night so none of them enjoyed their first night in France. The next day, these men set up pyramidal tents and started to get our newly designated area in a livable condition, T/5th Herman Yoselovits, our Post Office employee, was busy selecting a site and making preparations for the new Base Post Office.

On Sunday, 24 September, 1944, those Enlisted Men who were unable to land on Saturday, with the exception of S/Sgt. Cataloni and Cpl. Woloszynski, again were flown to Strip A-73 in B-26 Marauder bombers and this time were able to land safely. In addition, the following named Enlisted Men also made the trip.

Cpl. Carter Y. Powell
T/5 Francis J. Parra
Pfc Frank Melendez
Pvt. John D. Clark.
Pvt. Ralph F. Alvarez
Pvt. Walter A. Krol

During this period, Lt. Robert H. Gray, with the help of S/Sgt. Norman A. Fenerty and T/5th Marcus L. Johnson, was busy getting our Motor Convoy ready for the trip overseas. Trucks and trailers were loaded, shipping lists were made out and SOSTC forms were completed and turned in. By Monday night, 25 September, 1944, our Convey Was lined up and ready to roll.

On, Tuesday, 26 September, 1944 the Unit officially moved from England to the Continent. The following named EM were flown to Strip A-73, this time C-47 Transport planes were used.

1st Sgt William J. Dougherty
S/Sgt. Alfred A. Cataloni
S/Sgt Norman A. Fenerty
S/Sgt. Jack B. Skidmor.
Cpl. Donald G. Devitt
Cpl. James S. Hill
Cpl. Howard J. Koloszynski
T/5th George W. Doyl.
T/5th Marcus L. Johnson
T/5th John Knott
Pfc Melvin Allen
Pfc Walter J. Schneemeyer
Pvt. Bert Cloward
Pvt. Ageteno M. Mosca
Pvt. Harry M. Neihaus

These EM described the flight as very quiet and clear visibility enabled them to enjoy the scenery on the way over.

On the 26th of the month, T/5th Robert H. (Mother) Sennigan, our Mess Sergeant, opened our new Mess Kitchen which is shared with the 40th M R&R Sqd. of the 53rd Service Group. Thus far the meals have been excellent with plenty to eat for all.

On Wednesday, the 27th of the month, our Motor Convoy left AAF Station 166 enroute to the Continent. This Convoy was made up of three (3) Jeeps, on. (1) Command Car, one (1) 2 1/2 Ton Cargo, 8 23 Ton Chemical Service trucks and eight (6) Chemical Handling Trailers. With Lt. Robert H. Gray, our Convoy Officer, were the following drivers and assistant drivers:

Sgt. Harlan P. Karshek
T/5th Earl A. Anderson
T/5th Marvin W. Powell
T/5th Adelbert W. Hainlin.
T/5th Darrel J. DeBlois
T/5th Hyman Goldstein
T/5th James V. Bennett
T/5th Albion E. Michaud
T/5th John Sohr
T/5th Layton S. Hart
T/5th Casimir C. Kaplan
T/5th Starlin Bobo
T/5th Roy McClur.
T/5th Fred A. Keimel
Pfc Lionel E. Sabourin
Pfc Lawrence F. Kaszubowski
Pfc Raymond J. McGonagl.
Pfc Lee A. Peters, Jr.
Pfc Kenneth Zaleski
Pfc Frank Cavalier.
Pfc Patsy J. Trovator.
Pfc Homer D. Clark
Pfc Robert L. Hopkins
Pvt Adolpho Rossi
Pvt Earl W. Sandy

This Convoy has not arrived at Strip A-73 as yet but we have heard that they have landed on the Continent and that everything is going well.

Our headquarters and living quarters have been set up in an old Dairy Farm on the main road running through the village of Amy. The buildings in our area have been damaged by near misses of aerial bombs and these are being repaired by French workmen. Directly across the street from our Orderly Room are two huge bomb craters made by bombs from a B-26 and dropped while this village was still occupied by the Germans. Plenty of German equipment has been left here and much of it is being used by our men. By these indications, it looks as if Jerry left here in a bit of a rush.

The men of this organization have taken advantage of all the available room on this old farm for living quarters. Some are in the farmhouse, some are in tie stable and still others nave remodelled a chicken house into a very clean and cozy living place.

2. During the early part of the month, the organization was kept busy preparing for the trip to the Continent and turning over our Chemical Ammunition to various AAF Station and Chemical Depots. While disposing of leaking Mustard Bombs and Land Mines, five (5) Enlisted men were burned by the liquid mustard. Those injured were: S/Sgt. Alfred A. Cataloni, Cpl. Donald G. Devitt, Cpl. John J. Zeis, T/5th John Kott and T/5th James V. Bennett.

3. There were no maps made during the month or any photographs taken that might be classed as Company History.

For the Commanding Officer:

ROBERT H. GRAY
1st. Lt., CWS, Historical Officer


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1787 ###]

Auth: OG Ninth AF
Initials: 10 Oct 1944

40TH MOBILE R & R SQUADRON (Less Det "A")

APO 149 US Army Airstrip A-73

10 October 1944

314.7

Unit History, for September 1944

1. Organization: Negative.

2. Strength: a. Officers 6, b. Enlisted Men 130

3. Movement: From AAF Station 166, Matching, Chipping Ongar, Essex, England to AAF Strip A-73 Amy, Franc.

4. Casualties: Negative.

5. Decorations: Negative.

Perhaps the greatest event in the History of the 40th took place during the month of September. Following in the footsteps of the great Allied Armies that crashed through the German defenses in France and sent the Hun on a mad retreat that did not cease until they made a stand well within their Fatherland borders, the 40th packed its war bags and moved into France.

The movement began on the twenty-third of September and continued on thru the first few days of October. But from the middle of August until the departure day, there was ceaseless activity in proper preparation. On the line, Unit Chiefs added Benzodrine Sulphate pills to their regular dosage of headache powders, for in addition to their usual "keep-em flying" duties last minute inventories had to be made, equipment checked, packed, weighed, and stored, automobiles and trucks inspected, and new trucks had to b. "built up" to conform to the pattern of operation. In the meanwhile those in the Orderly room were confronted with the rearing of red tape's ugly head. The monster's appetite for paper and pencil records seemed insatiable. The sadistic medics insisted on getting in their telling blows with shots and physicals; headquarters wanted rosters by the score; and the Team called loud and long for details. Then too, service records, form 20's, paybooks, immunization records, and dog tags had to be checked and rechecked. Daily squadron meetings were held to keep tie men informed on how the race was being won.

The morning of the twenty-third awakened to a day of rain, cold and fog. But in the afternoon some twenty-six men under the direction of Lt Hysler boarded B-26's and took off for "far shores". All but three returned to Matching Green - our advanced party had landed!

The following day continued in the tradition of English weather. The wind blew, rains came, and the clouds were dark and heavy, but 59 men took their assigned places in the B-26's and soon were on their way to Strip A-73 in France, more specifically located in the town of Amy, six kilometers from Roye and some 62 miles from the heart of Paris.

From the air, England was a picture never to be forgotten by those fortunate enough to see it. But it’s beauty and picturesqueness were more definitely burned in our hearts when we discovered Amy. B-26's roared onto Strip A-73 and the 40th landed in strength. All around us were signs of devastation and destruction witnessed but by very few of the men before. For the first time one recognized the thoroughness and complaints of allied bombing - for once we saw the fruits of our labor.

The night was spent in a slightly "liberated" hangar. Men quickly set-up bunks, heated K or C rations, and turned in. To be sure, there was the usual small talk concerning itself about booby traps, French women, champagne, and the length of the war. Soon, however, there was the silence of sleep interrupted occasionally by the sigh of the wind as it creeped thru the broken windows or the banging of the door as late comers arrived.

The following morning, Lt Hysler located our area - it was composed more of mud then anything substantial. Tents quickly sprang up, floors and wooden walks laid, 3 mess hall established in a slightly blitzed barn. Having arranged for the necessities of life, a search was made for some of the essential luxuries. Here the men of the 40th in the literal sense of the word became part of a Marauder outfit. Miraculously and quite wonderfully stoves, lockers, wash basins, steel beds, and mattresses appeared on the scene, and the tents soon became quite habitable. On the following day, 26th of Sept, 22 more men and three officers, Capt Cogle and Lts Fleisher and Lt Countryman, arrived by transport. They informed us that Lt Speidel and 39 enlisted men had left Matching Green by convoy on the 26th to join us in France.

The final chapter of the movement was written on the third and fourth of October when the convoy arrived with the balance of the personnel and material. After their arrival, the area was moved to a better location, tents and walks set-up, the orderly room established in the attic of a combination house and barn, and a mess hall and kitchen built. On the morning of the fifth, the 40th once more went into the aeroplane business - we started operations in France.

Of personnel interest it is noted that on the tenth of September two privates joined the organization and on the twelfth one corporal and two privates became members of the squadron. Due to illness 2 EM could not accompany the outfit to Francs, and unfortunately have subsequently been transferred from the rolls. Lt Bistagne was transferred from Friston England, to the 1st (US) General Hospital. It is reported that he is making fine progress. And finally 1 EM left for the states under the "rotation plan".

JAMES H. HYSLER
1st Lt, A.C. Historical Office


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1791 ###]

COMPANY HISTORY of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn) September 1 to 30, 1944

30 September 1944

Organization - Negative.

Strength - As of September 30, 1944, the strength of the organization was four Officers and seventy-six Enlisted Men.

Movement - The 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn) was transferred from AAF Station 166, Matching, Essex, England, WI, 9930, to Strip A-73, Amy - Roye, France, N445-300, on September 24, 1944, per ltr, Hq, IX Air Force Service Command, Subject: Movement Warning Order, dtd 18 September 1944.

Casualties - Negative. Decorations - Negative.

The primary activities of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenanc. Co (Avn) in the early part of September, 1944, were concerned with preparations for the coming movement to France. These pre-movement activities were carried out in addition to our regular operational duties.

The Ordnance Supply and the Automotive Maintenance Sections were particularly hard-pressed during these pre-movement days. Only by working day and night was the Ordnance Supply Section able to perform its multiple duties; filling outstanding shortages of Ordnance items for the Bomb Group and for the Service Group, picking up at the depots, hauling, unloading, recording and reloading those items which constitutes our 30-day stock level, and crating, marking and loading those supplies already on hand at the Ordnance warehouses. This section remained in operation up until the last possible moment before the readiness date.

The industry and efficiency of Lt. Wardell's Maintenance Section is best attested to by the "Negative" report of deadlined vehicles on the date of the departure of the vehicle party.

Pvt. Walter A. Schoenradt, machinist in our Maintenance Section, was personally commended by Colonel F. T. Caldwell, Commanding Officer of the 53rd Service Group, "for his ability, efficiency and initiative which he evidenced in the fabrication of a much needed piece of equipment."

The Ammunition Section, for the first time since going into operation in December, 1943, received a short respite from its labors. Few missions were flown during the early part of September and few bomb convoys arrived at AAF Station 166, all of which resulted in the Ammunition Section's receiving a well-earned rest.

Off and on through the early part of September the organization was called on for men to serve as holding parties at other stations from which Service Groups had already departed.

The organization was fully prepared for movement by the 22nd of September 1944 in spite of the difficulties it was necessary to surmount. The last report on our activities at AAF Station 166 was a cheering one. The Air Inspector's Report of Evacuation of Station 166 and an accompanying letter from Headquarters, 1st AADA, transmitted to the Commanding Officer, Team "A", 53rd Service Group stated; "It is noted with extreme pleasure the condition of Station 166 upon evacuation of Team "A", 53rd Service Group This indicates good leadership and high moral within your command" The Officers of this organization share in the pride of a task well done.

During the last couple of weeks of our stay in England the buzz bomb or V-1 phase of the German aerial attack upon Britain was seen to be petering out. At the same time first-hand evidence was gathered that the next phase, that of V-2 or the rocket bomb, was off to an inauspicious start. Several explosions in the vicinity of AAF Station 166 were investigated by Bomb Reconnaissance Officers and NCO's of this organization. Bomb fragments and blast effect were noted and the consensus was, from a purely local point of view, that in spite of the tremendous blast effect of V2, its inaccuracy would relegate it to a position of secondary importance insofar as the military were concerned.

Departure from England was, on a miniature scale, much like departure from the States. Our organization had beer in England sinc. September 15, 1945, and had been at AAF Station 166 since December 27, 1943. During our stay in England many ties of friendship had been established. One member of the organization, Technician 5th Grade Benjamin D. Young was married shortly before our departure for France, and several other members of the organization had their marital intentions temporarily postponed by the movement.

The first body of men from the organization, one Officer and seventeen Enlisted Men, departed from AAF Station 166 on September 23, 1944. Of this body of men, one Officer and fourteen Enlisted Men arrived at Strip A-75, Amy - Roye. Bad weather forced the planes carrying the remaining three men to return to England,

The next day, September 24, 1944, the remainder of the airborne party arrived. Of the 4 Officers and 76 Enlisted Men of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn) two Officers and forty-seven Enlisted Men had arrived in France, and the remaining two Officers and twenty-nine Enlisted Men were members of the vehicle party.

The airborne party arrived at the field prior to the evacuation of the Fighter Group. While awaiting the departure of the Fighter Group six-man tents were pitched in an open field and mess facilities were set up.

The greatest difficulty encountered was, and still is, the shortage of suitable drinking water. Our rations were rather meager at first but were augmented by local produce gathered from nearby farm. Rations improved rapidly and by the end of the month were better than they had ever been since arriving in the ETO. Small, but sufficient, quantities of coal and wood were found and the heating situation was soon solved.

On the 30th of September, 1944, the organization was assigned four abandoned French farm houses and three barns. It was evident from writings on the walls of the houses and from debris in the barns and around the houses that German troops had occupied these same sites.

All the men pitched in to make these houses and their surrounding grounds not only liveable but presentable. Each building was swept out, windows repaired, holes in the roof patched, debris surrounding the buildings was shovelled up and carted away, weeds and tall grass was sickled, latrines and garbage disposal pits were dug, a mess hall, as good as any we had had since arrive] in the ETO, was set up and operating in very short order, walks were improvised and an earnest attempt was made toward mud control. Preliminary preparations were made for the arrival of the vehicle party. Their sleeping quarters were readied for them as much as possible, the barns were cleared of hay and junk in order that the shops could be set up with a minimum of delay.

Mail was brought direct from AAF Station 166 by planes of the 391st Bomb Group. After its arrival, morale returned to its previous high level.

On visiting the nearby town of Roye, members of the organization were very gratified by the kindly sentiments of the French populace. Barriers of language were either ignored, met by an exchange of high school French and broken English, or else completely overcome by use of some other common tongue; Spanish, Italian or Polish. The familiar cry of "Chewing Gum" was with us once more, along with a couple of newly phrased requests - "Bonbon" and "Cigarette pour papa". America's foremost ambassadors of good will, the soldiers, seemed to derive as much pleasure in gratifying these requests as the children enjoyed having them gratified.

The townspeople gave out the information that the Boche had evacuated from this area on the first of September and that within twenty minutes of the departure of the Germans, Allied forces had passed through the town. The FFI had taken over the job of rounding up stragglers and was still picking up these stragglers right up until the last of the month.

An enemy ammunition dump was examined by our Ammunition NCO, T/Sgt John W. Birnbaum. Sgt Birnbaum's description of the dump is as follows;

"This German bomb dump is located in a wood approximately three miles from the field. The area is so expertly camouflaged that it is practically impossible to spot the dump from either the air or the ground.

On arrival at this Air Strip, the Bomb Dump was found to be completely stocked. It contained all types of H.E. bombs up to 1000 Kg in size. There were a large quantity of anti-personnel bombs on hand packed in 100 and 500 kg size containers. These included 1, 2, 4 and 10 kg anti-personnel bombs. A very large quantity of incendiary bombs were on hand, especially the newest type, that with the separating explosive nose. There were also large stocks of all types of small arms ammunition with the exception of pistol ammunition. There were also large numbers of concrete bombs and it is interesting to note that all bombs were equipped with panic-producing screamers.

"The Germans had a very efficient method of handling their bombs. They had a complete narrow gauge railroad running through the bomb dump and to all parts of the field as well as to the railhead in the neighboring town.

"It appeared that this German bomb dump had been bombed but once and that time by no more than a flight of six planes. The bombs used were 1000 lb demolition bombs and bombing results were excellent.

"The bomb dump was rendered 100% non-operational and it would have taken several weeks to restore it to an operational status. It was a perfect piece of pin point bombing. Two sticks of bombs were dropped and each of the two had followed right up one of the main rail lines. Thus, due to the fact that there was no secondary means of hauling the bombs to the planes, the entire field could be considered to have been put out of operations until an auxiliary method of transporting bombs could be arranged.

"Another interest sidelight was the fact that the Germans had another and a larger bomb storage site already completely built in a woods approximately two miles from the dump already mentioned. It was apparent that they were prepared to move to the location of the bomb dump.

"Quite a few American bombs were found. These were undoubtedly recovered unexploded Bombs dropped on this field by the B-26s which had bombed it. Approximately 3% of the American bombs dropped here had failed to explode."

This German bomb dump is not being used by our organization. At present the plans are to keep one complete mission of bombs in our bomb storage area on the base and also two missions of bombs near the planes.

As of the 30th of September, 1944, a sufficient quantity of bombs have been stored to enable the Bomb Group to carry out its missions without any delay in operations whatsoever.

The tasks of accumulating these bombs, of preparing living quarters, and shop sites, and of setting up administration, were all carried on while the vehicle party was yet in England.

The vehicle party of this organization departed from AAF Station 166 and arrived at Southampton the same day. On the 30th of September 1944 the vehicle party boarded LCT's and embarked for France


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1796 ###]

Auth:
Date:
Initials:

U. S. ARMY

EMBARKATION PERSONNEL ROSTER

1589th Ordnance S&M Co (Avn) 50848 Matching, Essex, WL 9930

1ST LIEUTENANTS
O-1593553 Remer, Oswald M.
O-1552415 Wardell, William W.
O-1551775 Werran, Fred J.

2ND LIEUTENANTS
O-1553230 Brody, Irving

FIRST SERGEANT
37385610 Vernon, Gerald R.

MASTER SERGEANT
12017745 Emerson, Angelo A.

TECHNICAL SERGEANTS
32602050 Birnbaum, John W.
32719386 Bonanno, Thomas J.
18097563 Cooper, Carl C., Jr.
39186941 Hostetler, Jonathan
32539830 Koenig, Howard F.

STAFF SERGEANTS
36264933 Derkez, Edwin J.
17157435 Kimball, Robert A.
7002121 Woodham, Aris B.

TECHNICIANS 3RD GRADE
36374638 Hunter, Thomas F.

SERGEANTS
37410215 Beck, Orville D.
32539169 Roycik, Andrew
34370624 Smedley, Manker W.
35745763 Wilson, Gerald E.

TECHNICIANS 4TH GRADE
32588348 Cruthers, Charles L.
36149400 Cyrkiel, Henry
33299194 Dowie, Jimmie L.
36146570 Gordon, Robert B
16109941 Kowalec, Aloysius S
37419080 Mangold, Wilfred I.
31330518 Morico, Adam T.
38274639 Peddicord, Russell F.
35508531 Savage, John L.

CORPORAL
37169138 Nelson, Elmer

TECHNICIANS 5TH GRADE
18145256 Cirillo, Anthony J.
16156236 Danek, Louis P.
31274695 Drescher, Everett R.
12157699 Feinblatt, Irving
33226026 Hammack, John R.
35613608 Harris, Ralph W.
32631065 Jensen, Norman H.
31314196 Lesko, Joseph P.
32499564 McCaffrey, Thomas P.
32673034 McNamara, Goorge J.
35269995 Modory, Julius A., Jr.
38440467 Moncada, Tomas T.
31164462 Murphy, Michael R.
12155898 Perl, Tomas T.
37391918 Raterman, Lambert N.
33438935 Rutherford, Thomas , Jr.
35689652 Scour, Byron O.
16156490 Scheffner, Kenneth J.
32884239 Tatar, George
13130394 Wunderley, George E.
39005063 Young, Benjamin D.
32754585 Ziegler, George T.

PRIVATES 1ST CLASS
35495192 Armes, Robert L.
38327782 Brandon, Jim L.
33390439 Dumler, Joseph J., Jr.
33487890 Keller, Morris C.
34525947 Kindrick, Lonnie F.
35455460 King, George J.
39833335 Lytle, Ralph A.
33737869 Poms, Jack
32836591 Powers, Warren E.
38369988 Rochau, Herbert A.
33775742 Spaulding, Edward J.
36368359 Stewart, Charles E.
34456698 Wall, Charles I.

PRIVATES
33481646 Aman, Charles E.
34390674 Bell, Curtis J.
11037824 Bonnevier, Albert
39257008 Graves, Oral D.
35456490 Harris, Chester M.
35661914 Hughes, Oscar G.
31137199 Husson, Raymond D.
37128038 Kirkegaard, Anton L.
33282533 McGurvey, Francis X.
32501554 Mennella, Sulvatore J.
33487945 Moneglfa, Paul
37450099 Pumpkinseed, Nosh
34546299 Sands, John W., Jr.
36543465 Schoenradt, Walter K.
32449273 Seward, Victor D.
34356072 Smith, Terrence

Authorizing Signature: O. M. Remer, 1st Lt, 1589th Ordnance S&M Co (Avn)


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1802 ###]

Auth: CO, 53rd S. G.
Date: 10 Oct 1944
Initials:

1176TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY, SERVICE GP (AVN)
APO 149, US Army.

SUBJECT: Unit History.

To: Group Historian, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. The following is a subsequent installment of the Unit History of this organization for the month of September 1944.

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: (As of 30 Sep 44) Two (2) Officers, Thirty-eight (38) EM

c. Movement: Company moved from AAF Station 166, Matching, Essex, England, to Strip A-73, Roye/Amy, France, movement made by air.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. Unit Narrative: At present this unit is setting up and operating QM installations at its new station. All available QM supplies are being prepared. Sufficient quantities of Class I, II, III supplies are available.

DANIEL W. MAHONEY,
1st Lieut., QMC,
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1803 ###]

Auth: CG, 9th AF
Date: 10 Sept 44
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS
2198TH QUARTERMASTER TRUCK COMPANY AVIATION
53rd SERVICE GROUP
APO 149, US ARMY

10th October 1944

UNIT HISTORY for Month of September 1944.

1. Organization: Negative

Strength: 3 Officers 100 Enlisted Men

3 Enlisted Men asgd and jd.

3. Movement: Headquarters: AAF Sta 166 to RCRP #5. Det "A" : Negative

4. Casualties: Negative

5. Decorations: Negative

6. From 1st Sept to 27th Sept, Headquarters, 2198th QM Trk Co., Avn, remained at AAF Sta 166 and performed duties of a Quartermaster Truck Company attached to a Service Team of a Service Group. The vehicles hauled bombs, rations, air craft parts, personnel, gasoline and oil, and performed miscellaneous transportation duties at an AAF Station. On 27th Sept 1944, the unit departed from AAF Sta 166 by Motor Vehicles. The convoy down from Matching Green, Essex, England, to RCRP #5 was uneventful. There were no mechanical failures in any of the vehicles. At RCRP #5 the unit bivouacked for three days. Most of the men preferred sleeping in trucks or on the vehicles and housing facilities provided at this camp were not taken advantage of.

Det "A", 2198th QM Trk Co., Avn, consisting of 46 EM and 1 Officer continued operating from an AAF Station in France. From reports reaching this Headquarters, the men are engaged in transporting gasoline and oil, munitions, rations, air craft parts, personnel and miscellaneous transportation requirements.

PAUL S. GLICK
1st Lieut., QMC
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1804 ###]

Auth: Serv Gp CO
Date: 31 Sep 44
Init:

1052nd Signal Company (SG)
53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 30 April 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History.

TO : Commanding Officer, 53RD SERVICE GROUP, APO 149, U S Army. (Attn: Group Historian.)

1. The following is the September installment of the Unit History of this organization. Changes were as follows:

a. Organization: On a teletype from 1st AADA, Number S-253-C, dated 11 September 1944, the following man was transferred from the Company:

Pfc Douglas F. Daughtery 15372655 (955)

On Special Orders number 250 of Hq, 1st AADA, dated 21 September 1944, the following man was transferred from the Company:

S/Sgt Harold M. Bauer 37115135 (237)

On teletype S-253-C of 1st AADA, dated 12 September 1944, the following man was transferred to the Organization:

Pvt Lewis W. Lashbaugh 3354762 (650)

b. Strength: The Company is now two under the normal enlisted strength of 97.

c. Movement: Headquarters and Team A moved from AAF Station 166 to A-73, Roye/Amy, France by VOCO, IX AFSC. 1 Officer and 55 EM moved by B-26 and 1 Officer and 17 EM moved by convoy in the organizational vehicles. The movement was complete by 3 October 1944. Team B also moved during the month, but information is not available.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. On 23 September 1944, D-plus-109, Headquarters and Operations Sections and Supply and Maintenance Team A began movement to France. CAPTAIN RIECK and 17 men moved by convoy an the organizational vehicles, and the balance moved by B-26s belonging to the 391st Bomb Group. Some men traveled by C-47.

3. The movement by air was carried out by shuttle runs which carried individual baggage, mess equipment, and tentage. It was accomplished successfully except for the loss of three planes on a return trip because of sudden overcast. For some of the personnel it was the first trip by air, and for all it was an outstanding experience. The first group to arrive set up their cots for the night in a German hangar, and then tents were set up temporarily in what is now the motor pool area. The trip by motor was also without mishap and was highlighted by such sights as completely flattened Saint Lo and the beautiful outskirts of Paris.

4. In that the Alert Order had been received during the previous month the entire month was spent in the expectation and preparation for the move. All but the most essential equipment was packed ahead of time so that the move upon six hour notice could be made. On Special Orders Number 149 of Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 31 August, Sgt William W. Casey, T/5 Tolbert J. Neibich, and T/5 Raymond N. Blair and on Special Orders Number 154 dated 12 September Sgt Casey, T/5 Edward E. Sheerer, and Pfc Beyrl R. Cullen were sent to Station 154 and 170 respectively to service a bomb group after the departure of the service team and before the air echelon had moved completely, so in a like manner men from the 1075th Signal Company (SG) were sent to 166 after our departure to service the 391st Bomb Group until it became operational on the continent on 2 October 1944.

5. The move was made after ten months in England. For some it was the traditional "so long Piccadilly and Leicester Square", but for most , "the Brentwood boys", it meant the end of what they called "The Battle of Brentwood". For all there were memories to be left behind. The daily volume of mail the Company sends to England attests to this fact. Having been in such close proximity to London the Organization saw a great deal of the doodle-bug campaign, and the night of the 22nd brought a final salute in the form of the largest and lowest flying one we had seen and it came directly over the Company hut. During the month the men saw one of the most inspiring sights of the war - the hundreds of troop carriers and gliders of the 1st Allied Airborne Army on their historic flights to Belgium. On the first day a glider crashed near the Station, killing its occupants.

6. At Airstrip A-73, a former German base which suffered devastating bombing and from which the Germans departed in great haste less than two weeks before the arrival of our first party, the 1052nd was assigned two buildings. The larger was built by the Germans and was perhaps one of the finest buildings on the field. It suffered a direct hit and a near miss at one end which completely demolished the rooms at that end. A direct hit by a lighter bomb at the other end of the building did damage that we were able to repair. This building will house the orderly room, warehouse, radio repair, mess hall, and the living quarters for most of the personnel. The second building is a former French home and suffered a near miss which destroyed an adjacent building. This will house operations and will be the living quarters for most of the men of that section. In anticipation that the Bomb Group will be at this location for some time the men have been doing a very thorough job of putting the building in order.

7. In that the vehicles did not arrive until the 3rd of October we were hindered by lack of transportation. Buildings loaded with materials needed to repair ours were left by the Germans and discovered by the alertness of LT PASHWA were available but to get these needs transported, plus such items as picking up drinking water from a water point seven wiles distant, getting rations, etc., was an acute problem. This was alleviated by the 40th Bomb Disposal Squadron which became attached to the Organization for rations and was very generous in lending its vehicles. An alternate plan for which Sgt Gagosian's Section had high hopes was the narrow gauge steam engines the Germans had left behind and for which they had had tracks all over the field and an abundance of rolling stock. The first engine they tried to fire had been damaged by men of the Bomb Group trying to fire without water in the boiler. By a hit or miss method the engine was gotten under way by about 50% of its own power and 50% manpower. An excellent system of transport was envisioned by the "1052nd Transportation Corps", but these dreams were shattered when "Number 1" after developing a sudden and unprecedented head of steam gave the boys a wild ride late one night which was terminated with a simultaneous jumping the tracks and blowing the boiler. The other engine likewise proved unserviceable.

8. As was mentioned previously the advance party had the privilege of arriving less than two weeks after the departure of the Germans and has the opportunity of visiting the nearby towns such as Roye very shortly after their liberation. The Company has also had the opportunity of exploring the exhilarating drinks of France which is an occupation much to its liking. Some of the boys have already visited French homes and have brought home amusing tales such as T/5 Blair's dropping his French book in his soup. Many are learning French rapidly.

9. The Company has its own mess and the food has been excellent. Much of it comes in by air transport. The men draw no KP as two civilians were hired, and T/5 Freddie Bedross's fluency in French has been of great service in this respect.

10. Shortly after arrival the Company received a visit from LT COL STINSON from 1st AADA. An outcome of the visit was the fact that higher headquarters is directing that the Company is to be divided into two equal teams with a headquarters consisting only of the CO, a clerk, and a driver. It is interesting to note that this is precisely the breakdown worked out independently by CAPTAIN RIECK when the Organization was first divided at the first of the year. It is projected that headquarters of the Service Group will be at some distance from A-73 and will service both teams from a distance. This breakdown will be worked out next month and covered in the next installment.

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1807 ###]

Auth: CG 9AF
Date: 4 Jan 44
Init:

87th Service Squadron

APO 149, US Army 10 October 1944.

SUBJECT: Squadron History (Installment IX, 30 September 1944)

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with Letter, Hq, 53rd Service Group, Subject: Unit History, 23rd January 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. 8 Officers, 1 Warrant Officers, 232 Enlisted Men

c. Arrived AAF Station 173, Dunkeswell, near Honiton, Devon, 28 July 1944. Departed AAF Station 173 and arrived at AAF Station 162, Chipping-Ongar, Essex, 13 November 1943; departed AAF Station 162, 27 December 1943 and arrived at AAF Station 166, Matching Green, Essex 27 December 1943. Departed Matching Green, Essex, England and arrived at Airstrip A-73, Roye, France, 24,25, 26 September and 1, 2, 4, 7 October 1944.

d. Casualties: Negative

e. Decorations and Awards: Negative

2. During the month of September 1944, the preperstions for overseas movement that had been so painstakingly followed were put into effect as the organization changed it's location from Matching Green, Essex, England to Airstrip A-73, Roye, France. The movement was very successful and ran smoothly despite inclement weather.

3. On the 24th of September, 1 Officer, 1 Warrant Officer, and 12 Enlisted Men flew to Airstrip A-73, Roye, France, in Marauders operated by the 391st Bomb Group. This group constituted the advance detail and reception group for the balance of the organization. They set up the mess in an old barn and some tents for living quarters and the following day 35 additional Enlisted Men flew to France. On the 26th of September 2 Officers and 88 Enlisted Men left AAF Station 166 in C-47 transport planes. This party comprised the administrative staff. Working with the original party they set themselves up in the partly demolished German barracks and buildings. Dilapidated roofs were torn down and new ones were improvised from captured German building materials. Floors were laid and the areas were cleared, wiring for electricity were placed, etc. The area assumed a liveable appearance enabling the personnel to live comfortably.

4. A detail of 2 Officers and 30 Enlisted Men, who had been left behind to take care of the odds and ends at AAF Station 166 arrived on the 1st of October. They had left the evacuated station in such good order that a letter of commendation was initiated by the Air Inspector. (Copy Attached)

5. 3 Officers and 53 Enlisted Men departed Matching, Essex with all the organizational vehicles and equipment. This convoy party traveled by road and crossed the Channel via LST, leaving AAF Station 166 on the 27th of September and landing at Utah Beach, Normandy on the 30th of September 1944.

WESLEY B. GOVER, JR.,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1808 ###]

HEADQUARTERS 1ST ADVANCED AIR DEPOT AREA (REAR) IX AIR FORCE SERVICE COMMAND

APO 149, US Army

2 Oct 1944

333.3BG

SUBJECT: Evacuation of Station 166 by Team "A", 53rd Service Group

TO: Commanding Officer, Team "A", 53rd Service Group.

THRU: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group.

1. Attached hereto is Air Inspector's Report of Evacuation of Station 166 by Team "A", 53rd Service Group.

2. It is noted with extreme pleasure the condition of Station 166 upon evacuation of Team "A", 53rd Service Group. This indicated good leadership and high moral within your command.

By order of Colonel MOSS:

ROBERT E. CHUPP
Major, AGD,
Adjutant General

1 Incl: Air Inspector's Report dtd 30/9/4


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1809 ###]

Auth: CO, Team B
Date: 4 October 44

1812th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co. (Avn)
Office of the Company Commander Team "B", 53rd Service Group

APO 149, US Army 4 October 1944

Subject: Unit History.

To: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army. Thru: Commanding Officer, Team "B", 53rd Service Group.

1. In compliance with Paragraph 3, letter Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, subject same as above, dated 23 January 1944, the following report is submitted:

A. Organization: T/O 9-417 29 Sept/43 as changed by WD Cir 201, dated 22 May/44.

B. Strength: 30 September 1944: 4 Officers, 77 Enlisted Men.

C. Date of arrival or departure of Station: 19 September 1944, organization left A-15, Maupertus at 0700 hours and arrived at A-39, Chateaudun, France 1800 hours.

D. Awards to & Decorations of Members: Negative.

2. The company has remained on a "one move per month" basis now for three successive months. On 19 September 1944, Strip A-15 was left behind and the unit became re-located at Strip A-39, approximately two miles south east of Chateaudun France. The movement was made by military aircraft and by military vehicle transport. The move involved an advanced forward of roughly two hundred miles and carried us thru most of the important combat areas of Normandy. The convoy moved along the famous "Red Ball" route, an experience certain to be remembered for a long, long time.

3. It was necessary to leave a detachment of nine men behind to clear the base of all bombs and explosives. This detail was carried through very capably by Sgt. Pete Sylvester who was placed in charge.

4. Upon arrival at our new station it soon became apparent that the long and rough ride over the Red Ball Route had taken its toll. In our own company, Sgt. Dancik and T/5 Nash performed a fine emergency repair job and brought their GMC home intact. The Service Group vehicles especially were heavily overworked due to the necessity of having to send them back and forth so often to bring down aviation gasoline etc. However, combined operations between Automotive and Supply again brought things gradually back to normal.

5. Gradually, and only gradually, this organization is accumalating its "basic load" which was shipped to the continent for us in care of 5th TAD. The latter organization literally stole these supplies from us and its effect is readily apparent by the strain it has placed upon us and upon our present depot to keep our vehicles in operation. Any forthcoming move which will take us farther away from our base of supplies will truly make this situation critical. The Automotive Officer of 1st AADA is attempting to secure these stolen parts for us.

6. The move has aided the tactical position of the combat group with the result that the result that the tactical missions being flown has increased proportionally. There has been a marked turn-over in combat personnel lately.

7. The company established itself in tents with the exception of the Automotive Section who operated under an open blister hangar. The living site included tents for both officers and enlisted men and a kitchen constructed with wooden beams and covered with tarpaulin. A mechanics shelter completed the mess hall and provided ample room for messing requirements.

MICHAEL B. HEINDL
Capt., Ord. Dept.,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1811 ###]

AUTH: CO Team "B"
Date: 5 Oct 1944
Initials:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE SQUADRON
Office of the Commanding Officer

APO 149, US Army. 5 Oct. 1944.

In reply refer to: 314.7

SUBJECT: Unit History.

TO: Commanding Officer, 1st Advanced Air Depot Area, IX Air Force Services Command, APO 149, U. S. Army.

1. In compliance with letter, your headquarters, dated 1 September 1944, subject and file number same as above, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: No change.

b. Strengths O-7, WO-1, EM-227.

c. Movement: Pursuant to authority contained in TWX S-182-P, dated 12 September 1944, from 1st Advanced Air Depot Area (Advanced), organization left Strip A-15 (Maupertus, France) 0700 hours on 19 September 1944 and arrived at Strip A-39 (Chateaudun, France) 1730 hours on the same date. (The reconnaissance party moved on the 19th and the advanced party moved on the 12th.)

d. Casualties: None.

e. Decorations: Pursuant to the authority contained in General Order No. 153, Headquarters, IX Air Force Service Command, APO 149, U. S. Army, dated 1 October 1944, S/Sgt. William H. Macey, 17019562, was awarded the Bronze Star Medal for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services in the Engineering Section of this organization as an Airplane Sheet Metal worker, during the period 15 December 1943 to 14 February 1944. S/Sgt. Macey developed and perfected a modification which allows ready release of the life raft from the flight deck of all B-26 Aircraft. This enables the Co-Pilot of B-26 aircraft to pull the dinghy release from his seat in one operation and has been adapted for all B-26 Aircraft under IX Bomber Command.

2. Organization performing 3rd Echelon Maintenance on B-26 Aircraft for the 387th Bombardment Group (M).

3. Work accomplished by the different sections of the organization during the month of September:

a. Air Corps Supply: During the beginning of the month this section was hindered somewhat in furnishing supplies for the Bomb Group in that the AOG items were rather slow in coming in at first.

b. Engineering Section: This section performed seven (7) engine overhauls, four (4) 25 hour inspections, four (4) 50 hour inspections and two (2) 100 hour inspections. The different shops in this section handled the usual jobs that came up.

c. Finance Section: All units of this strip plus two (2) full Battalions of Aviation Engineers were paid on the last day of the month.

d. Medical Section: Approximately twenty-five (25) patients were treated each day in the Service Team.

e. Transportation Section: This section furnished transportation for the usual runs and upon arrival at this strip has been hauling aviation gasoline twenty-four (24) hours a day.

IRWIN L. UNGERLEIDER,
Capt., Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1816 ###]

AUTH: CO, 53rd Serv Gp
DATE: 8 November 1944
INITIALS:

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP
APO 149 US ARMY

31 October 1944

SUBJECT: Monthly Installment of Unit History.

To: Group Historical Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with memorandum, Headquarters, IX Air Force Service Command, No. 20-10, dated 25 October 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 28 Officers and 130 Enlisted Men.

c. Movement: Maj Farmer and 9 EM Finance section, Capt Davies and 4 EM Chemical Section, Capt Morse AC Supply Officer, 1/Lt Wexler and 3 EM Special Service, 1/Lt Lane and 3 EM QM Section, 3 EM Medical Section, 3 EM Photographic Section, and 1 EM Ordnance Section DS with Team "A", 53rd Service Group. Capt Henderson, Statical Officer, 1/Lt McGovern & 2 EM Ordnance Section, Capt Bettinger, Asst S-4 Officer, 1/Lt Hoffman and 6 EM Finance Section, 1/Lt Warren and 3 EM Chemical Section, 2/Lt McElroy and 2 EM Special Service, 3 EM Photographic Section, 3 EM Medical Section, 2 EM QM Section and 1 EM Air Corps are on duty with Team "B", 53rd Service Group.

d. Casualties: Negative

e. Decorations: Negative

2. A Short narrative of the part played in the war by this organization.

a. On Wednesday, September 27th, our motor convoy left Station 166 at Matching, Essex, England, and started on it's long and exciting journey to join the rest of the squadron which had already been transported to France by air. Under the command of Lt Col Harry D. Stone, Group Executive Officer, the convoy party included Major Gilbert L. Klemann, Group Surgeon, Captain Travis Purdy, Group Chaplain, 1/Lt Charles L. McQuillan, Group Transportation Officer, 2nd Lt Mansell B. McElroy, Group Asst Special Service Officer and 32 Enlisted Men. The motor caravan consisted of 2 commend cars, 4 two-and-one-half-ton trucks with one-ton trailers, 1 decontamination truck, 3 weapons carriers with one-ton trailers, 6 jeeps with one quarter-ton trailers and 2 motorcycles. With Pfc Walter M. Mitzel acting as lead scout on the forward motor-cycle and Cpl Frank T. Kiselik riding the "end of convoy" motorcycle. The motorcade made good time through Southern England and reached the marshalling yards at Southampton at the end of the first day's run. The following, day was spent in undergoing the rigid inspection procedure proscribed for all Frence-bound convoys. Anticipating a second good night's sleep, all hands retired early only to be aroused at three o'clock in the morning and told to prepare for embarkation. Perhaps it was the sudden interruption of sleep or the density of the prevailing fog which accounted for one of the boys taking a brief and unexpected dip in the briny deep in the process of boarding the transports. With all men send vehicles accounted for, the convoy personnel relaxed and waited in pleasant idleness for the "ships" whistle. Before heading out into the Channel one of the most impressive and memorable experiences of the trip took place as the two LCTs carrying the remainder of Headquarters Squadron were lashed together and Chaplain Purdy conducted a general worship service to invoke the blessings of the Almighty on. the days ahead. With the same quietness that marks all outbound passages, the convoy slipped it's moorings and set it's course towards the coast of France. In fourteen hours' time men and vehicles were landed on Utah beach at the base of the Cherbourg peninsula amidst the protruding hulls of the "ghost ships" that had descended onto the fathoms on D-Day and D-Day plus. The general comment on the water journey found all in agreement it was "rough and choppy" and a few of the boys "gave their ail" while riding the swell. With the swiftness that has catapulted the incredible mass of men and material onto the Continent and dispersed them to their appointed destinations, men and vehicles were rapidly checked, fitted into a larger convoy and started on their amazing journey which was to begin with the breath-taking devastation of St. Lo, carry then through the Caen pocket, graveyard of Naziism in France, on to the bloody battle-grounds of Carentan, through villages, towns and cities, each marked in it's own special way by the blight of war. If there had ever been any reluctance to forego the experience of flying to France in order to ride the convoy, it quickly disappeared as the days that followed left no doubts that here was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see at first hand the overwhelming might of the conquering Allied Armies and the utter chaos and destruction demanded as the price of freedom. Travelling at high Speed over the red ball highway, creeping along the bomb pitted roads of the "blitzed" areas, the panorama of war passed by the convoy in sweeping glances as refugees returned in search of homes and belongings, once proud Nazis were herded along in dejected silence to priscner-of-war camps and the long pent-up wrath of a bonded nation gave expression to it's fury in the pitiless and pitiable treatment of those who had "sold out" to the invaders in the dark days of 1940. Here the crowds gathered to spit and stare at a "pretty face" covered with a scarf to hide a head completely shorn of tresses; there an excitement prevailed as anther collaborator was publicly exhibited for his shame. But over all was the expression of hope for better days as the people of France raised their hands in the V for Victory salute and smiled their encouragement to the passing men of war. As each day passed, filled as it was with the excitement of their experiences and the exhaustion of travel, sun down found all ready and eager to partake of their K rations and "bed down" for another night in the road camps which dot the convoy highways through France. Under the influence of the deep weariness that taxes all "dust eaters" and "mud huddlers", the men found no difficulty in falling asleep in the seat of a cab or in an improvised bed under canvas stretched from the side of a truck. After three full days "on wheels" the motor convoy arrived at Beauvraignes and the movement of Headquarters Squadron from England to France was completed. At exactly 1315 on 3 October the boys rolled into the German rest camp on the outskirts of the village and greeted the rest of the gang with the old familiar expression "Hello, Joe", "Have I got any Mail", "Where do we eat", "Have you guys been paid yet?". With all questions answered and appetites satisfied, life soon returned to normal and England seemed very far away. With plenty of conveniences and four villages within walking distance, more than one GI was hoping that the squadron was to settle down for awhile. But after days of suspense and amid the customary rumors which deployed the unit all the way from Belgian border to the coast of China, an advance detail was sent to city of Beauvais to "ready up" the grounds and buildings of two country estates. On October 12 the squadron once again packed it's bags, tied down it's canvass covers and set out to find another home. If we found the elaborateness of the rest camp of Beauvraignes to our liking, with it's swimming pool, steam heated buildings and modern plumbing, what can be said of the chateau of the Prefect of Paris Police which houses the Officers and the adjoining summer home of a Paris banker and insulated German barracks which house the Enlisted Men. In the space of four days 48 Officers and Enlisted Men have been sent on detached service to Team "A" at Roye/Amy and to Team "B" at Beaumont. Once again we begin to function as a headquarters unit and once again we know the pleasant thrill of working together and taking our place in the pattern of Victory that has been worked out by the Supreme Command.

b. Captain David G. Henderson, Asst Statical Officer, was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Squadron, 6 October 1944.

3. This unit is at the present time stationed at Strip A-61A, Heauvais, with 53rd Service Group Headquarters. Five (5) Officers and twenty-six (26) enlisted men of this unit are with Team "A", 53rd Service Group, Strip A-60, Beaumont. Six (6) Officers and twenty-two (22) enlisted men of this unit are with Team "B", 53rd Service Group, at strip A-73, Roye/Amy.

JOHN A. EVERHARD,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1819 ###]

42ND MOBILE RECLAMATION AND REPAIR SQUADRON 1ST ADVANCED AIR DEPOT AREA

APO 149, US Army 6 November 1944

Subject: Unit History for October 1944

To: Commanding General, IX Air Force Sv Comd, APO 149, US Army. Attn: Historical Branch. THRU: Commanding Officer, 1st Advanced Air Depot Area, IX Air Force Service Command,
APO 149, US Army

1. In compliance with Memo. 20-10, Hq, IX Air Force Sv Comd, dd. 25 October 1944, the following Unit History for this organization for October 1944, is herewith submitted:

a. ORGANIZATION - No change.

b. STRENGTH - Officers (9); Enlisted Men (181).

c. MOVEMENT - Negative

d. CASUALTIES - Negative

e. DECORATIONS - Negative

f. Organization attached to the 1st Transport Group (Prov), IX Air Force Service Command, effective 0001 hours, 12 October 1944, per par. 3, GO #163, Hq, IX Air Force Service Command, dd. 12 October 1944. Organization relieved attachment from 1st Transport Group (Prov) per par. 1, Section II, GO #169, Hq, IX Air Force Service Command, dd. 20 October 1944.

SHERWOOD H. HANSEN
1st Lt, Air Corps
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1820 ###]

Auth: CG Ninth AF
Init:
Date: 6 Nov 1944

40TH MOBILE R & R SQUADRON APO 149 US Army

AAF Strip A61-A 6 November 1944

314.7

Unit History for October 1944,

1. Organization: Negative

2. Strength: a. Officer: 10 b. Enlisted Men: 183

3. Movement: Organization moved from AAF Strip A-73 to AAF Strip A-61-A, at Beauvais.

4. Casualties: One (1), Non Battle Casualty: Pfc Patsy Tufariello, Det "B", 40th R & R Sq, was accidentality injured when a 25 cal. pistol, which he was examining was discharged. The projectile entered the lower right side of his neck.

5. Decorations: Negative.

Once again the 40th was intact. The Motor Convoy arrived in two sections, 2nd Lt Speidel and 23 EM arrived on the 2nd of October and Sixteen additional men arrived o the 4th of October, bringing together the complete squadron.

Many were the stories, the men had to tell of their trip. Tales of the ravages and destruction of modern warfare were most prevalent. The wreck and ruin of Saint Lo, was beyond description, and the beauty of Paris, had inscribed itself deep within the men that had the good fortune to view it as they passed through.

Flowers for Staff Sgt O'Nil L. Doucette, he had the good fortune to return to his loved ones by the "Rotation Program." We bid him "Bon Voyage" and here's hoping the rest of us won't spend thirty six (36) months overseas before our return is realized.

Pete LeCleres' mobile Unit No 1, departed for a repair job at AAF Strip A-70. Also T/Sgt Currans’ Unit No 4 had to repair a damaged aircraft at AAF Strip A-68. Mobile Unit No 6 of Detachment "A", had an engine change at AAF Strip A-39. A B-26 aircraft was forced down near Cherbourg and Mobile Unit No 7, with T/Sgt Gowdy in charge, was called upon to make the necessary repairs.

Mobile Unit No 9, with T/Sgt Steele in charge, first salvaged a B-26 Bomber that had crash landed in a field near Dun, France, and then had the unique experience of traveling to a spot approximately, fourteen miles behind the front lines, near Aachen, Germany, for the purpose of repairing 4 battle damaged aircraft which had been forced down in that vicinity. The Unit had to repair the plane and then prepare it for storage because the runaways for it to take off on, had not been repaired.

One Officer and six Enlisted Men from the Bomb Disposal Squadron, and Nine Enlisted Men from the Finance Section, were attached to the 40th for rations only. And lucky indeed were they, the 40th has this reputation for having the best mess on the Field.

A Memorable day, wad the 18th of October 1944. Once again the 40th was divided and a new detachment was established at AAF Strip A-73.

Detachment "A", was redesignated as Detachment "B", and a new Detachment "A" was established at AAF Strip A-73, with the Headquarters personnel moving to Group Headquarters at AAF Strip A-61-A, at Beauvais, France, per authority contained in 1st Ind Letter, headquarters, 1st AADA, IX AFSC, File 370.5, SUBJECT: Movement of Troops, dated 12 Oct 44.

Two Officers and four enlisted Men now comprise the Headquarters section of the 40th Mobile R & R Sq. Four Officers and 102 Enlisted Men are members of Det "A", at AAF Strip A-73 and Det "B" had a total strength of Four Officers and 77 Enlisted Men, at Strip A-60.

1st Lt Bistagne returned from his period of hospitalization. Though still a little weak, he was anxious to return to his job as Engineering Officer of Detachment "A".

Detachment "B" (Then Det "A") moved from Strip A-39 to AAF Strip A-60 near Beamount on the 15th. The usual scenes of devastation greeted their arrival and there was the usual rush and bustle of setting up on a new site.

Due to inclement weather the planes of the two bases have not been very active and the men of both Detachments have have a chance to get their living sites into the proper conditions.

ELRY L. FLEISHER,
1st Lt., A.C., Historical Officer


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1822 ###]

Auth: CO 53rd Serv Gp
Date: 4 November 1944
Initials:

COMPANY HISTORY 1769th ORDNANCE SUPPLY & MAINT CO AVN

OCTOBER 1944

Organization: Negative.

Strength: 2 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer (jg), 71 Enlisted Men.

Movement: Negative.

Casualties: Negative.

Decorations: Negative.

PERSONNEL

17 - Cpl Leo J. Puchalski, 32742194, assigned and joined from Hq & Hq Sq. IX Air Force Advanced Depot Area Command.

RECREATION

The enlisted men of this organization have organized an "Enlisted Men's Club". Pvt James Seawrisht was elected Chairman of the club and the council is represented by a member of each section of the organization. T/Sgt Samuel Ells, Tec 4 Maurice Roberge, Tec 5 Daniel Taylor, Tec 5 John Reed. Construction of the club is now under way. Building material was obtained from damaged buildings once occupied by Jerry. The club will be equipped with ping-pong tables, library, snack bar, and a writing room. The men of this organization are looking forward towards spending many a sociable evening in their club.

RESUME

Automotive Section

The automotive repair shop of this organization went into operation at this base under deplorable conditions. The buildings they had to work in were falling apart and manure was spread around knee deep. Rain kept falling continually and the atmosphere was quite cold. Men had to crawl under vehicles in puddles of water in order to put them back into operation as soon as possible.

Work was immediately begun to remove the manure and debris. Gravel was hauled in to level the ground and improve the looks and traversing of the area. Roofs were patched and gaping holes in the walls were soon boarded up. Finally lights were installed and stoves were set up enabling the men to work under better conditions.

The men of this section had resigned themselves to working under these conditions, when word came that the section was changing its location. They were moving into quite a large unoccupied factory that the Germans had taken over from the French in order to make cement blocks before being driven off in turn by our forces. Quite a bit of work was needed to put the garage into operation but that was soon accomplished. Today, the men of this section are proud of their efforts and boast of having one of the best "setups" in the ETO.

Ammunition Section

The men of this section cleared an old German bomb dump of unexploded bombs and ammunition. The men started to store their bombs here but later on it proved to be too small. At the present time the men are operating in an open field using railroad rails for dunnage which helps a great deal in operations. During the early part of the month we had to haul our own bombs from the depot, sometimes going seventy or eighty miles away. At the present time a trucking outfit is hauling the bombs.

Armament Section

This section over-hauled Cal. .50 machine guns which were to be returned to the Depot for salvage.

Supply Section

This section procured and issued equipment to units on the station during the month of October. The following items were unattainable at the depot due to the priority of the ground forces: six (6) Armor, flyer's protective, M5 or T-13 (groin) for the 553rd Bomb Squadron; Spotlight-Ambulance, complete for the 194th Med. Dispensary (Avn); one (1) Winch, assembly (CV-3666183) for the 554th Bomb Squadron; Cylinder, acetylene, 225 cu. ft. filled (complete with valva) Icc Spec. No. 8 for the 554th Bomb Squadron and the 555th Bomb Squadron; compressor, air, portable, gasoline, engine driven, 1-3/4 HP, 6 cu. ft. complete with hose for the 76th Service Squadron; compound, anti-freeze and 200 gal. of ethylene glycolttyde urgently needed for organizations on this strip. Tires and tubes are almost impossible to obtain at the depot.

JAMES H. TSCHAPPT
Captain, Ord. Dept., Historical Officer


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1825 ###]

AUTH: CO, Sta A-73
Date: 31 Oct 1944
Initials:

COMPANY HISTORY of the 1589th ORDNANCE SUPPLY & MAINTENANCE CO (AVN)

1 October 1944 to 31 October 1944

Organization - Negative

Strength - As of 21 October 1944 the strength of this organization is four Officers and 76 Enlisted Men.

Movement - Negative

Casualties - Negative

Decorations - Negative

As of the 30th of September 1944, two Officers and forty-seven Enlisted Men had already arrived at Air Strip A-73, France, while two Officers and twenty-nine Enlisted Men were still enroute to join.

1st Lt. Fred J. Werran arrived eat Air Strip A-73 on the 1st of October after having served as holding party for our organization at AAF Station 166, England.

The vehicle party consisting of one Officer and 29 Enlisted Men departed Southampton Harbor at 0700 hours and arrived at Utah Beach, France, at 1000 hours on October 1, 1944. Immediately upon touching land, the vehicles proceeded from the LCT's to the assembly point and at 1500 hours the same day the convoy was formed and started for Air Strip A-73.

The initial start of their journey in France took them through French towns, the names of which were already familiar to all of them from their readings on the Normandy Campaign - Carentan, St. Lo, Viri, Argentan, towns which had borne the brunt of the power of the Allied military machine. And then through L'Aigle, Verneuil, Dreux, Gambrais, Versailles, Paris, Chantilly, Creil, Clermont, St. Just en Chausse, Montdidier, Roye, and at 1800 hours, 3 October 1944, to their destination, Amy, France.

During the convoy the splendid work of the Automotive Maintenance Section had been noted and 1st Lt William W. Wardell was commended by Lt. Col. Harry B. Stone.

After the arrival of the vehicle party this organization settled down to its regular operational duties.

1st Lt. Fred J. Werran was hospitalized October 13, 1944, as the result of burns suffered by the explosion of a cartridge while he was working in the Bomb Storage Area.

On the 15th Of October 1944, 1st Lt. O. M. Remer, the Company Commander, was promoted to Captain. (Par 11, SO 289, Hq, Ninth Air Force dtd 15 Oct 1944)

Toward the end of the month the very limited social activities that were to be had in nearby town made it clear that further facilities for entertainment were needed on the base. Work on a company day room neared completion on the 31st of this month, tables, soft chairs, reading material and games were procured and everything was set for the opening. It is believed that this day room, in addition to the base special service facilities, will greatly. aid in maintaining a high standard of morale within this organization.

O. M. REMER
Capt, Ord Dept
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1827 ###]

Auth: Co 53rd S.G.
Date: 4 Nov 1944
Initials:

SUBJECT: Unit History - 1176 Qm Co Sv Gp TO: Group Historian, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, U.S. Army.

1. The following is a subsequent installment of the Unit History of this organization for the month of October 1944.

a. Organization: Negative

b. Strength (As of 31 Oct 1944): Two (2) Officers, Thirty-seven (37) EM

c. Movement: Negative

d. Causalities: Negative

e. Decorations: Negative

2. Unit Narrative:

During the past month, the Class III section of this organization has run into extreme difficulty in procuring, 4 sufficient quantity or supplies. Grease, Oil and Kerosene have had to be hauled in from the beach. Both bulk and packaged gas have been obtained from whatever source made available to us by 9th Air Force Service Command.

Class I supplies, in general, are being procured without much difficulty. As yet, a few items have not been available in sufficient quantity. The proper supply level on C and K rations is being maintained at all times by this Class I Section.

A great deal of difficulty has been encountered in obtaining many items of Class II Supply.

HAROLD P. JACOBS
Captain, QMC,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1828 ###]

Auth: CG 9th AF
Date: 5th Nov 1944
Init:

HEADQUARTERS
2198TH QUARTERMASTER TRUCK COMPANY AVN
53rd SERVICE GROUP
APO 149, US ARMY

5th October 1944

UNIT HISTORY for Month of October 1944.

1. Organization: Negative.

2. Strength: 3 Officers, 100 Enlisted Men.

3. Movement: Headquarters: From RCRP 5, Southampton England, to AAF Station A-73, Roye/Amy France. Det "A": From AAF Station A-73 to AAF Station A-60.

4. Casualties: Negative.

5. Decorations: Negative.

6. The unit left RCRP 5 on the 1st October 1944, proceeded to Southampton and boarded LST 500. There was no mishap connected with the boarding of the ship, and vehicles ware parked on both the tank, and upper deck. The ship mowed from the landing about 1200 hrs and remained anchored in Southampton bay for the night leaving for France at about 0830 hrs 2nd October 1944. The unit landed on Utah beach at approximately 0230 on 3rd October 1944, unloaded, and proceeded to the vehicle transit area. There the convoy formed and the Unit proceeded by way of Paris to AAF Station A-73. On the following morning all vehicles were unloaded and checked and the first meal served in the mess hall was breakfast on the 5th October 1944. The unit is quartered in houses that were occupied by German personnel. Vehicles on various runs about 200 miles per day.

Detachment A, 2198th QM Truck Co., Avn consisting of 49 EM and 1 Officer, moved from AAF Station A-43 to AAF Station A-60. The men are engaged in transporting gasoline and oil, munitions, rations, air craft parts, personnel, and filling miscellaneous transportation requirements.

PAUL S. GLICK
1st Lieut., QMC
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1829 ###]

Auth: CG 9AF
Date: 4 Jan 44
Init:

87th Air Service Squadron

APO 149, US Army 5 November 1944.

SUBJECT: Squadron History (Installment X, 31 October 1944)

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with Ltr, Hq, 53rd Serv Gp, Subj: Unit History, 23rd Jan 44, the following squadron history installment is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 8 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 230 Enlisted Men

c. Arrived AAF Station 173, Dunkeswell, near Honiton, Devon, 28 July 1944. Departed AAF Station 173 and arrived at AAF Station 162, Chipping-Ongar, Essex, 13 November 1943; departed AAF Station 162, 27 December 1943 and arrived at AAF Station 166, Matching Green, Essex 27 December 1943. Departed Matching Green, Essex, England and arrived at Airstrip A-73, Roye/Amy, France, 24,25, 26 September and 1, 2, 4, 7 October 1944.

d. Casualties: Negative

e. Decorations and Awards: Negative

2. The 87th Service Squadron completed it's move during the early part of October. The 3 Officers, 53 Enlisted Men who landed at Utah Beach, Normandy 30 Sept joined the body of the organization 2 October 1944. The 11 EM driving the unit special vehicles arrived 4 October. Two EM, left in the UK on detached service with the station holding party completed their duties arriving at Roye/Amy via C-47 Transport on 7 October.

3. The sunny skies and warm weather experienced at Roye/Amy during the latter part of September and early part of October disappeared. The skies were bleak and rain poured incessantly, turning the roads and living areas into veritable quagmires. Air Operations were brought to a standstill but work was hastened on the problem of making living more comfortable. The mess hall, built from the shambles of a once lovely cottage was contemplated, initiated, and completed. An indoor shower serving 12 men at once was erected in an abandoned barn. The shower was ingeniously constructed and when finished provided as comfortable a place to shower us any the personnel of this organization had experienced at permanent bases while in the UK. A 25 ft water tower was constructed from logs and 6x6 wood beams and a 700 gallon tank set on the platform with lines leading to a 400 gallon tank in the barn where the water heater NaS placed. The 400 gallon water tank is connected to a 250 gallon hot water pressure tank. The shower room itself is provided with a steam radiator. Water is supplied from a well discovered nearby and pumped to the tanks by an old Germam pump. This excellent bit of work was accomplished through the untiring efforts of the 87th Serv Sq First Sergeant, Louis J. Carlo, who with his detail of men labored in the inclement weather procuring from unmentionable sources the necessary materials and constructing.

4. Shortly before leaving AAF Sta 166 in England a large proportion of organizational property and supplies was boxed and delivered to RTO for delivery on the Continent. Up until this date only a small percentage has been delivered working a hardship on the organization. Of the crates that did arrive some of the contents were in poor condition and practically unusable due to rough handling somewhere along the line. At present searching parties are endeavoring to locate the balance of this shipment.

5. During the month of October, 3 EM were dropped from the squadron's roles, two being left in England at the time the squadron moved to the continent and one in France where, due to hospitalization, transfer was effected.

THOMAS B. HAWKINS
1st Lt., A. C.,
Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1831 ###]

Auth: CO, 53rd Serv Gp
Date: 2 November 1944
Init:

HEADQUARTERS 76TH AIR SERVICE SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP

SUBJECT: History of Organization.

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with letter, your headquarters, Subject: History of Organization, and Memo 20-10, Hq IX AFSS, par 4b and 4c, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: (1) Changes in organization effected by new T/O's or other means: Negative.

b. Strength of Organization: (1) Period covering from 1 October to 31 October 1944 Commissioned: 7 Officers, 2 Warrant Officers, 236 Enlisted Men

c. Movements: Negative

d. Casualties: Negative

e. Decorations: Negative

2. Contribution towards the war effort and part played by this unit: The greatest contribution toward the war effort by this organization is, maintaining supplies for combat personnel and aircraft, maintenance and servicing of aircraft for combat duty for the past nineteen months.

PAUL L. SAFFELL,
Major, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1832 ###]

Auth: Serv Gp CO
Date: 31 Oct 44
Init:

HEADQUARTERS 1052ND SIGNAL COMPANY (SG)
53RD SERVICE GROUP

A-61-A, US Army 31 October 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History. TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, Strip A-61-A, US Army. (ATTN: Group Historian)

1. The following is the September installment of the Unit History of this organization. Changes were as follows:

a. Organization: On verbal authority from higher headquarters and by 1st Indorsement, Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 16 October 1944, to letter, file number 370.5, Hq, 1st Advanced Air Depot Area, dated 12 October 1944, subject: "Movement of Troops" (copy attached) the Company was redivided and redesignated as follows: Company Headquarters is now located with Group Headquarters and designated as 1052nd Signal Company (SG) (less Detachments A & B); Detachment A, located with Team B of the Service Group, was redesignated Detachment B, 1052nd Signal Company (SG); and the balance of the organization is designated as Detachment A, 1052nd Signal Company (SG).

b. Strength: Company Headquarters has one officer and six enlisted men; Detachment A has one officer and 46 enlisted men; and Detachment B has 1 officer and 43 enlisted men, bringing the total to three officers and 95 enlisted men. There were no changes in personnel during the month, so the strength is still two enlisted men under normal strength as it was last month.

c. Movement: On 15 October 1944 Detachment B (then Detachment A) moved from Strip A-39, Chateaudun, W-265604, to Strip A-60, Beaumont Sur-Oise, S-0576. On 21 October 1944 Company Headquarters was set up at A-61-A, Notre Dame du Thil, VM9109, Headquarters, 53rd Service Group.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. With the arrival of the vehicles on the 3rd and 4th of October the movement to France was completed for all elements of the 1052nd. Last to arrive, the nine organizational vehicles with CAPTAIN RIECK in charge and 17 EM left Station 166, Matching Green, England, in a convoy of 120 vehicles of the 53rd Service Group on the 27th of September. The first and second nights were spent in the marshalling area, Camp C-5, near Winchester. The alert came at 0330 on the morning of the second day. Because of unfavorable weather the crossing was held up, and the night was spent aboard the landing craft. The ship which carried our vehicles was the LCT 677. This ship has been the lead ship of its flotilla on D-Day and was struck by a mine near the starboard engine but made the shore. CAPTAIN RIECK became acquainted with the British Lieutenant in command and learned he had spent some time in South Carolina where the 1052nd was stationed before leaving for the ETO. The convoy landed at Utah Beach on 1 October 1944. The radio and warehouse trucks were on a different shipping number from the other seven vehicles. The convoy went through Carentan, St. Lo, Vire, and Argentan which gave the boys a chance to see some of the wreckage of war. The convoy went through Versailles and St. Germain but was unable to cross the Seine and had to go to Mantes to cross the river. The destination as designated by the Transit Area B where route instructions were received, was reached the second night, the 2nd, and the night was spent at A-60 where the Detachment B is now located. Strip A-73 was reached on the 3rd by the main group, and the two vehicles traveling in another convoy arrived on the following day.

3. On the 21st of October Company Headquarters was established at Headquarters, 53rd Service Group, located at Notre Dame du Thil, VM 9109, near Beauvais. This situation is approximately midway between the two air fields where the Teams are located and is in the sane town where the 30th Air Depot Croup, our next highest technical and supply headquarters, is established. In this location in an office in the chateau occupied by Group Headquarters CAPTAIN RIECK could best perform his duties of Commanding Officer of a Company divided between two Air Strips, of Group Signal Officer, and also keep a close check on supply problems at the Depot. The following personnel were moved with Company Headquarters:

CAPTAIN WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR. O-469001 (0210) Commanding Officer
Sgt Florience R. Dicke, Jr. 35336466 (667) Message Center Clerk
T/4 Byrne W. Pike 39844307 (955) Clerk
T/5 Anton Klein 37287073 (511) Armorer & Wireman
T/5 Leland Montgomery 15104546 (237) Driver
Pfc James G. McMechan 39184647 (237 Teletype Operator
Pvt Lewis W. Lashbaugh 33547622 (650) Switchboard Operator

a. The first communications established were a temporary courier service and telephone system of two extensions off the switchboard of the 1020th Signal Company (SG) located on the field, A-61 outside Beauvais. Cpl Klein with the assistance of Sgt Dicke installed a system of 15 extensions, our own switchboard, and two trunk lines running into the switchboard of the 30th ADG. One of these lines is simplexed for teletype which was also in operation in short order with Sgt Dicke doubling as teletype operator in the absence of Pfc McMechan, who is in the hospital. Sgt Dicke and Cpl Klein set up their message Center and Communications Office in the basement or the chateau. The small room serves as their living quarters also (the balance of the EM live in a nearby German built barrack) and is so neatly arranged and full of ingenious devices the boys have really bedded down for the winter and have received complements on their work from COLONEL CALDWELL and many others.

b. The office on the main floor of the chateau serves as Company Headquarters, Group Signal Office, and orderly Room for the men of the Headquarters Section. A great part of the Company administration is handled here. The personnel are messed with the Hq & Hq Sq, 53rd Service Group. Permanent courier service to both Teams will be effective on the 1st of November, and the drivers will spend the night at Company Headquarters.

4. Detachment B (formally Detachment A) with a personnel of 1 officer and 23 EM left the UK on the 20th of August and arrived at their first station on the Continent, strip A-15, Maupertus, 250267, near Cherbourg, on the 24th. This may make them eligible for battle credit in the announced campaign "Northern France", 25 July to 14 September 1944. On September 19th the Detachment moved to Strip A-39, Chateaudun, W265604, which was formerly a show place of the French Air Force. The men were not here long but were very busy. Between the 1st and 19th of October the Radio Repair section cleaned, checked, and repaired 156 radio sets and salvaged the radio equipment on three B-26's. During this period two EM from the 1025th Signal Company (SG) were on TD with the Detachment to operate the teletype machine. A-39 is located near the town of Orleans where the boys were permitted to go on day pass. Special Service took over a theater to show motion pictures and just before the boys left featured a civilian show called "Paris Revue". On the 15th of October the Detachment moved to Strip A-60, Beaumont Sur-Oise, S-0576, where they joined a new bomb group, the 386th, and a new service squadron, the 76th. Facilities are lacking on this field and a lot of work has to be done to set up operations. On the 21st of October 20 EM were transferred from Detachment A, bringing the strength to 1 Officer and 43 EM:

DETACHMENT COMMANDER
1st Lt John M. Casson O-1643738 4400

RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
M/Sgt Malcolm D. Raines 34231859 955

ASST RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/3 Francis S. Brownell 11039851 951

AIRBORNE RADIO CHIEF
T/4 Bernard (NMI) Kastner 35220090 951

AIRBORNE REPAIRMEN
T/5 Knowles R. Roberts 34820933 647
T/5 William E. Siebold 31354795 647

VHF REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Simon H. Snider 38329725 951

VHF REPAIRMEN
Pfc Thomas H. Conn 38434696 647

RADAR REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 Robert J. Martin 46245300 955

RADAR REPAIRMEN
Cpl John W. Noonan 36722636 955
T/5 William C. Finley 38318823 955
T/5 Richard C. Matthews 13150898 955
T/5 Frederick A. Hofmann 13159542 955
Pfc William P. Carr 19135821 955

WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/Sgt Frank A. Swider 33135179 581

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/5 Henry L. Pratt, Jr 38410858 835

WAREHOUSEMEN
T/5 John W. Depew 34186223 835
T/5 David S. Hymovitz 33054079 647

WIRE CHIEF
T/Sgt Jarvis J. Phillips 16043194 950

LINEMEN & INSTALLER REPAIRMEN
T/4 Thomas J. Brennan 33712143 950
T/5 William W. Pinkerous 32240257 238
Pfc Ormal P. Goodell 36554706 950
Pfc Leland (NMI) Johnson 37285804 950

CHIEF SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
T/5 Robert J. Higgins 12059069 239

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS
Pfc Ernest F. Colbath 31114167 650
Pvt Ronald W. Wood 19170878 ???
Pvt Walter J. Stilley 34147463 650

CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
T/5 Ben T. Ware, Jr 34597673 237

TELETYPE OPERATORS
Pfc Howard F. Fischer 35684695 237
Pfc Richard E. Otis 36479127 237

PERSONNEL CLERK
S/Sgt Merhl W. Sulcer 33371646 275

CLERK
T/5 Robert H. Paul 33247036 405

SUPPLY SECTION
Sgt Jerome V. Lundblad 39280944 405
T/5 Peter Slata 33362208 766

COOKS
Sgt Alexander W. Wertensky 36719841 955
Pfc Lemoine C. Shaw 16024418 060

MESSAGE CENTER CHIEF
Sgt Floyd H. VanGuilder 31114163 667

MESSAGE CENTER CLERKS
T/5 Edward J. Doyle 11088302 667
Pvt Kenneth H. Lincoln 12207730 667

MOTOR MESSENGERS
Pfc Willard M. Austin 12066999 695

CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
T/5 Robert G. Kampert 13152313 766

RADIO OPERATORS
T/4 Frank J. Squadrito 13098795 766
T/5 Clifford S. Jelliff 12098430 766
Pfc Edward J. P. Murphy 11115777 776

a. This shift of personnel brought the set up of the Detachment to much the same as it was when the Company was first split at the first of the year in the USA. S/Sgt Sulcer is back in his old job as acting First Sergeant of the Detachment. The Detachment was redesignated from "A" to "B" by 1st Indorsement Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 16 October 1944, to letter, File number 370.5, Hq, 1st AADA, dated 12 October 1944, subject: "Movement of Troops" a copy is attached. The boys are now hard at work building a day room and bar in addition to working on their quarters and technical sites. The Supply and Radio repair sections have been repairing a building for their equipment.

5. By the same authority mentioned above the Detachment at strip A-73, Roye/Amy, AN 448288, was designated Detachment A and consists of the following officer and 46 EM:

DETACHMENT COMMANDER
2nd Lt William W. Pashwa O-1645273 0500

RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/Sgt Vaughn W. Gagosian 31355338 647

ASST RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
T/3 Donnis E. Taylor 34395374 955

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
Sgt William W. Casey 36171752 647

AIRBORNE RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Aaron K. Kraft 16097032 647
T/5 William W. Craig 35800677 647
T/5 Raymond N. Blair 33553738 647

VHF RADIO REPAIR CHIEF
Sgt Joseph C. Bleiler 31090438 951

VHF RADIO REPAIRMEN
T/5 Edward E. Sheerer 33508965 951
T/5 Tolbert J. Neibich 33506232 647

RADAR REPAIR CHIEF
T/4 George C. Lewis 39324364 955

RADAR REPAIRMEN
T/5 George M. Parker, Jr 16085397 955
T/5 Richard M. Ramsbey 35541621 955
T/5 Finley M. Gleason, Jr 39024227 955
Pfc Beryl R. Cullen 16127760 955

WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
S/Sgt John J. Costello, Jr. 12034091 581

ASST WAREHOUSE FOREMAN
T/5 Reece B. Drinnen 34186188 835

WAREHOUSEMEN
Cpl Cecil C. Summers 18039762 405
Pvt Joseph J. McFadden 31161569 835

ASST WIRE CHIEF
S/Sgt John (NMI) Fischer 37471453 261

LINEMEN & INSTALLER REPAIRMEN
T/5 Robert A. Phelps 37493604 950
T/5 Keiner E. Shumaker 34178731 238
Pfc Calvin C. Hornbeck 15075230 238
Pfc Willie D. Risher 14099839 238

CHIEF TELEPHONE OPERATOR
T/5 Will T. Shiflet 38413103 238

SWITCHBOARD OPERATORS
Pfc Donald I. McCoy 16101404 650
Pfc Charles L. Coley 36718896 650

CHIEF TELETYPE OPERATOR
Sgt Warren S. Parsons 34537736 237

TELETYPE OPERATORS
Pvt Stanley A. Szoda 32241294 237

CHIEF TELETYPE REPAIRMAN
Sgt George W. Malanger 3?151870 239

FIRST SERGEANT
F/Sgt Robert Gray 35262884 502

CLERK
T/4 John M. McCarty 31062428 405

SUPPLY SECTION
Sgt Laurel C. Howard 39831883 405
Pvt Aven B. Moody 18125096 650

COOKS
T/4 Ciro M. Montuori 12191777 060
T/5 Fred (NMI) Bedross 32872058 060
Pvt Tom D. Olin 36735567 647

MOTOR TRANS NCO
S/Sgt John J. Corsall, Jr. 12067069 813

AUTOMOBILE MECHANIC
T/5 Laverne J. Tiedeman 36246651 014

CHIEF RADIO OPERATOR
T/Sgt Anthony J. Laraia 31045818 766

RADIO OPERATORS
T/4 William F. Finn 31098430 766
Pvt Edward A. Olsen 12095760 766
Pvt Clarence C. Rankin, Jr 33301555 766

MESSAGE CENTER CHIEF
S/Sgt Raymond (NMI) Perry 34178024 667

MESSAGE CENTER CLERKS
T/5 Meyer S. Finkelstein 12082078 667
Pvt Samuel (NMI) Ben 12096566 667

MOTOR MESSENGERS
Pfc James L. Drinnen 34186258 345

. The men of Detachment A spent the month of October repairing, the buildings which dad been assigned to them. The building now houses the Signal Warehouse. Radio Repair shop, Orderly Room, Mess Hall, and some of the personnel. The other building has been assigned to the operations section and most of the Operations personnel are quartered there. All personnel are now comfortably settled in their new quarters and on the 23rd of October a short meeting was held at which the boys decided to have a proper house-warming after the First of the next month. At the meeting LIEUTENANT PASHWA, Detachment Commander, gave a short talk in which he thanked the boys for the fine cooperation they had shown in the work which had been accomplished. He also cited several of the boys for the leadership they had shown in getting things done. Among those mentioned were T/Sgt Laraia, T/Sgt Gagosian, S/Sgt Perry, and S/Sgt Fischer.

b. Numerous trips were made during the month to various German warehouses and railheads. Large quantities of enemy material and equipment were acquired for use by the Detachment. The mess hall under the management of T/4 Montuori acquired several tables and a quantity of chairs for use in the dining hall now under construction. The Radio Repair Section profited the most by the excursions as they received a supply of German Signal Equipment which will provide a good stock of spare parts. The Detachment also became the owner of a German half-track vehicle through a deal between LT PASHWA and MAJOR WESLEY F. GOVER, service Team Commander.

c. The Telephone Installation and Repair section, under the direction of S/Sgt Fischer, has been one of the busiest sections during the month. After installing the telephone system of the Service Team the crew set out to repair a German pole route between Roye and Beauvais. Upon completion of this work, three talking circuits and one TWX circuit will be provided between these points. Progress has been slow at times on this project because of heavy damage caused by fighting in this sector. All work being done is open wire work which is a little new for most of the section. Despite this fact the job is rapidly nearing completion. Sgt Belanger, teletype repairman, has been giving S/Sgt Fischer some very able assistance on this line work.

d. The Radio Repair Section under T/Sgt Gagosian has contributed a large share of the work done on the building now occupied by the detachment. In addition to this work the boys have set up their shop, and the photo-bugs in the section have installed a photo dark room in the basement of the main building. Every night several men of the section may be found in the shop using their own time to repair civilian sets which have been brought in.

e. The Operations section has been kept busy repairing the building assigned to them and setting up the equipment necessary for maintaining Signal communications. The Radio, Telephone, and Message Center Sections are now in operation, and the Teletype Section is set to go as soon as the line to Beauvais is completed. While cleaning the area surrounding their building some of the boys unearthed an old well. The pumping system was repaired, and the well is now supplying water for cooking and washing. It is hoped that in the future it may be utilized to provide water for a shower room.

f. The Headquarters and Warehouse sections were for the most part content with doing the work assigned to them. The kitchen acquired a new cook when Pvt Olin joined the staff. He had been on Base Defense in the U.K. and general handy man of late but was placed in the mess hall to help out because of shortage of personnel. He has learned fast and has been a factor in the good chow now being provided by the boys. T/5 Bedross, the other cook on Sgt Montuori's staff, has been doubling as interpreter. Being the only man in the Detachment who can speak French fluently, he has been a great help in all dealings with French civilians.

g. The morale of the men has been excellent. This is due to the fact they have a nice comfortable, clean place to work and live, and they know that this is possible only because they worked together to make it that way. The addition of a shower room and a recreation hall in the near future should boost the morale even higher.

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1839 ###]

Auth: CO, 1ST AADA
Date: 12 Oct 1944
Init:

HEADQUARTERS 1ST ADVANCED AIR DEPOT AREA IX AIR FORCE SERVICE COMMAND

APO 149, US Army 12 October 1944

370.5

SUBJECT: Movement of Troops.

TO : Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, U S Army.

1. The following, units will move as indicated:

UNIT FROM TO APPROX STRENGTH O-EM O/A DATE
Hq & Hq Sq, 53rd Serv Gp A-73 A-61-A 28 135 12 Oct 44
1052nd Sig Co Serv Gp (less Dets A & B) A-73 A-61-A 1 9 12 Oct 44
40th Mob R & R Sq (less Dets A & B) A-73 A-61-A 3 30 12 Oct 44

2. Movement will be by air, rail and/or motor transportation. 60-114 F 433-01-02-03-04-05-07-08 A 212/50425.

3. This is a permanent change of station.

4. All organization equipment will be taken.

5. sufficient rations will be carried for the duration of the journey and at least two days:thereafter.

6. Units will comply with ltr 370.5, Adv Hq, IX Air Force Service Command, 20 Aug 44, subject: "Operations, Movements Control on the Continent of Europe", with particular reference to prompt submittal of Reports of Arrival; and ltr 370.5, Adv Hq, IX Air force Service Command, 2 Sep 44, subject: "Standard Operating Procedure for Unit Movements on the Continent".

By order of Colonel VOSS:

ERVIN G. HAACK
Captain, Air Corps, Actg Asst Adj Gen


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1840 ###]

1st Ind.

C-R-3

Hq, 53rd Service Group, Strip A-61-A, US Army, 16 October 1944.

TO: Commanding Officer, 1052nd Sig Co (SG), Strip A-61-A, U S Army.

1. For compliance with basic communication except that only enough enlisted personnel necessary to operate your Headquarters Section will be moved to strip A-61-A.

2. The Detachment of the 1052nd Signal Co now located at Strip A-73 will be designated as Detachment "A", 1052nd Sig Co (SG).

3. The Detachment of the 1052nd Signal Co now located at strip A-60 will be redesignated as Detachment "B", 1052nd Sig Co (SG).

By order of Colonel CALDWELL:

ROBERT W. RHEA
Captain, Air Corps
Asst. Adjutant


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1842 ###]

AUTH: CO 53RD SV GP
DATE: 6 Dec 1944
INITIALS:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE GROUP

APO 149, US Army 6 December 1944

In reply refer to: 300.6

SUBJECT: Installments of Unit Histories. TO: Commanding General, IX Air Force Service Command, APO 149, US Army. ATTENTION: Historical Branch, Intelligence Section. (THRU CHANNELS).

Transmitted herewith in compliance with par 5, Memo 20-10, Hq, IX Air Force Service Command, 25 October 1944, are installments of Unit Histories for organizations of this group for your information.

For the Commanding Officer:

ROBERT W. RHEA
Captain, Air Corps
Asst. Adjutant

9 Incls: Unit Histories.

[Abridged]

ROBERT F. CHUPP,
Major, A.G.D.
Adjutant General


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1843 ###]

AUTH: CO, 53rd Serv Gp
DATE: 3 December 1944
INITIALS:

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP
APO 149 US ARMY

30 November 1944

SUBJECT: Monthly Installment of Unit History.

To: Group Historical Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with memorandum, Headquarters, IX Air Force Service Command, No. 20-10, dated 25 October 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative

b. Strength: 29 Officers and 134 Enlisted Men

c. Movement: Negative

d. Casualties: Negative

e. Decorations: Negative

2. A short narrative of the part played in the war by this organization.

a. Honorable mention, this mouth, goes to Sergeant "Ace" Carrigan of the Transportation Section whose quick thinking resulted in the apprehension of three Nazi super-men, who were reported in the vicinity by a native French women. As "Ace" tells the story, with much modesty, it was just a case of heading for their hideout on the double, picking up a couple of MPs on the way and the element of surprise did the rest. All of which goes to show that not all of the "incidents" take place on the front lines.

b. If we are not in a position to load the guns "up front" or pilot the planes over the enemy's territory, we can always help to provide the ammunition and buy the ships needed to do those jobs. When the "Eagle screamed" on pay day, 30 November, the boys "Shelled out" more than $400.00 for U. S. War Bonds to exceed ten per cert of the month's cash pay roll and the stipulated percentage aimed at as the Squadron's quota. We gratefully acknowledged the efforts of T/Sgt William T. Burt and S/Sgt James J. Lehman who so painlessly separates the boys from their "dough" as they passed through the pay line. Likewise, we pay our respects to the CO whose ingenuity conceived the idea of stimulating a bond drive by raffling off a carton of smokes among the purchasers and whose sales talks proudly convinced us of the soundness of the investment.

c. Master Sergeant William L. Poplin, our Aircraft Engines Technician, who left us at Station 166 in England for a brief period of hospitalization, returned to Headquarters Squadron on November 6th and was immediately requisitioned by Team "A" at Amy for some important inspection work. We say welcome to "Pops" whose valuable technical knowledge will be much in demand again.

d. On November 30th Staff Sergeant Samuel M. Fisher was transferred to Headquarters Squadron from the 40th Mob R & R Squadron and placed on detached service with Team "A" at Amy to help carry on the Army Educational Program. Knowing the splendid work S/Sgt Fisher did in England in connection with the orientation program and the Enlisted Mens' Council, we shall expect to hear some good reports of him from the boys at Amy.

3. Social high-lights for November 1944.

a. Having in mind the principle that there is always room for improvement, our many conveniences have been augmented through the co-operation of all the men who "pitched in" to provide the Squadron with the finest Day Room at any Station in the E.T.O. With a polished mahogany bar left behind by the Nazis in their hasty Departure, together with plenty of easy chairs, reading lounge and writing tables obtained from nearby German Warehouses, the cheerless emptiness of the rooms in the south end of the barracks building were soon transformed into a lively recreation center which includes a ping pong court, combination lounge and library, writing room and "poker den" with felt topped "round table" over which the fortunes of the Squadron change hands with the swiftness and unpredictability that attend the games of chance and make all of us grateful for the far-sightedness of those who conceived the Soldiers' Deposit Plan, the Insurance Program and the Allotment Scheme. After a day's work which more than likely includes a healthy session with the cross-cut saw, GI Joe can drop in for a few beers or a class or two of cider and browse through the well stocked magazine racks, exercise his brain over a game of checkers or have a go at five, ten and fifteen. For perfect relaxation, a quiet corner with a novel or detective story from the circulating library will make the evening pass by all too quickly. For the reckless guy there is the opportunity to challenge the few "experts" who hover over the chess board with that "I dare you" look on their faces at all times. And when that "lucky feeling" rolls around, there is always the "den" down the hall with it's irresistible invitation to join those who seek the favors of the whimsical Lady Luck wrapped in the elusive smoke fog that hangs in uncertain heaviness below the glaring spot light which reveals so clearly the other guy's ace in the hole while at the same time hiding so cleverly his expressionless poker face in the dim shadows. With talk of a music box and possibly a radio to round out the appointments of the Day Room, the needs of the enlisted men are will provided for and there is little time left for too much "wishful thinking" about Romford, Chelmsford, Brentwood, Ongar and the rest of the old familiar haunts of England. For those who still like to prowl at night, there are four movie shows a week at the Jeanne Machette School Hall in Beauvais under the supervision of the 30TH AIR DEPOT GROUP and a number of cafes along the route which provide good spirits or a single night cap. And just to insure a well rounded leisure-time program, our Special Service friends from Team "A" at Amy and Team "B" at Beaumont drop in occasionally to give us a special treat or run off a bingo party at which the whole Squadron can sit together and compete for prizes ranging from Chef Polzin's apple pies to the much coveted packs of cigarettes. For their latest contribution to our welfare, we express our thanks to the Special Service Unit from Term "B" for the recently installed volley-ball court which was christened on Sunday, November 26th by a "double header" between the Officers and Enlisted Men who split the honors by winning a game a piece. With marked frequency the genial "merci" is creeping into tie daily lingo and fast displacing the much vaunted "ta". After two samplings of the finest products from the Champagne cellars of Perrier-Jouet, through the courtesy of our valuable contact men, the entire Squadron is ready and eager to join with the native population in wholeheartedly shouting *VIVE LA FRANCE".

b. It would be nice to to able to record that Thanksgiving Day dawned bright and clear with a golden sun making, it's bow over a clear blue horizon in a manner reminiscent of the sun rises in Cakosh or Kalamazoo or Brooklyn or wherever our favorite spot might be, bit as a matter of fact and in line with strict factual reporting, it rained like hell all day. However, it takes more than a rainy day to dampen the spirits of the men of Headquarters Squadron and if weather wasn't according to the best home traditions, the program for the day left nothing to be desired, with an excellent turkey dinner cooked to perfection and served to the men by Captain Everhard, our Commanding Officer, 1st Lt Lick, ow Squadron Adjutant, First Sergeant Cheatwood and a number of the ranking non-coms. Promptly at 1215 hours, all of the Enlisted Men dressed in Class "As" formed the customary line in the mess hall and proceeded past the chow tables laden with an abundance of roast turkey, giblet gravy, chestnut stuffing, creamed potatoes, buttered peas, candied carrots, dropped cookies, crushed pineapples, cider apples, candy and coffee. Everybody had a good laugh as one of the boys exclaimed "this must be Thanksgiving" and recalled the song from the last war, "I've Got My Captain Working For Me Now". With everyone seated, all eyes were turned in the direction of the "speakers' table" and all heads were bowed as Chaplain Purdy read the beautiful prayer of thanksgiving from the souvenir program culled "Nous Remercions Dieu" distributed to each man to commemorate the religious services held on the Sunday following Thanksgiving. Needless to say, many of the programs found their way into envelopes addressed to the folks back home and helped in some measure, we hope, to compensate for the empty chairs at the family table. The next twenty minutes were devoted exclusively to "the taming of the Shrew" and the splendid efforts of the mess personnel who put so much work into planning the menu and so many extra hours into it's preparation, were amply rewarded by the rich compliments to be heard throughout the dining room, all of which were perhaps crystallized by the single remark of one enlisted man who said that "this is the best Thanksgiving dinner I've ever had anywhere in the service". After the turkey had "become but a shadow of it's former self", the speaker's table began to stir and our Master of Ceremonies, M/Sgt John A. McCarthy proceeded to get the entertainment program under way. With the casualness and spontaneity that stamp him an experienced host, he introduced each guest in such a fashion us to leave no doubt that there are plenty of unfilled places in the Rogues' gallery and in addition to the fun and humor provided, we suspect that more than one of the boys was deeply touched by his recollection of the places they have been and the experiences they have shared together since trading their "civies" for Uncle Sam's khaki. And certainly, all of us felt grateful after his apt and pointed comparison between our celebration this year and last year's observance. In a moment of seriousness he reminded us that we have our definite place in the current struggle and if the fortunes of war and the complexities of the service system have cast us in an unspectacular role, we are, none the less, a vital part of the gigantic squeeze play that is steadily confounding the Axis. The high spot of the festivities was reached when our Commanding Officer, Captain Everhard rose to address the gathering, and stated simply and with u(NMI)stakable sincerity that the principal reason for his gratitude on this Thanksgiving Day was his good fortune in being associated with such a fine group of men. In our turn, we wish to go on record in saying with equal sincerity that his magnificent tribute is heartily reciprocated. For his leadership, understanding, fairness and personal interest in each of us individually and in all of us as a Squadron, we are truly grateful. When a Unit reaches that stage where the desires to conform is universal, the high degree of cooperation that exists between the Commanding Officer and his men, on the one hand, and among the men themselves, on the other hand, is the best proof of the strongest morale development throughout the whole Squadron. At a time when the morale factor is receiving so much emphasis and wiser conditions which require the utmost in mutual consideration, Headquarters Squadron has reached an all-time high in solidarity and united effort. As a fitting climax to the occasion, our hard-hearted First Sergeant, so described here because all First Sergeants are supposed to be hard-hearted, dispensed with the one O'Clock formation and another Thanksgiving Day, away from home, slipped into the storehouse of our memories which will be recalled with pleasure in the years to come. And none of them, we are sure, will be more pleasant to remember than our get-together on November 23, 1944 in Beauvais, France.

c. With the Liberty Run to Paris in operation since the middle of the month, the "City Beautiful" has come in for a goodly share of "oh's and ah's" as the Officers and Enlisted Men vie with one another in describing the stately magnificence of Notre Dame, the imposing height of the Eiffel Tower, the spaciousness of the Place de la Concorde and the many other wonderful sights in this city filled with gay French-men and "chic" women. With the promise of added messing facilities, it is a foregone conclusion that Paris will see more and more of us.

d. The daily radio news bulletin so expertly edited by S/Sgt Edwin C. Adams continues to compete with the daily edition of the Stars and Stripes which comes to us through the courtesy of our faithful mail men who also brings mail (sometimes). As we follow each new advance on the map table and realize the cost of each foot of ground gained against the forces of the opposition, the unending mud and the indescribable hellishness of war, all our hopes and prayers go out to our soldier-comrades who fight and die for the freedom that we cherish mostly only when it is challenged, for the rights that we take for granted too often and for the privileges and responsibilities that have meaning and life to Democracy.

4. This unit is at the present time stationed at Strip A-61-A, Beauvais, with 53rd Service Group Headquarters. Six (6) Officers and twenty-six (26) Enlisted Men of this unit are with Team "A", 53rd Service Group, Strip A-73, Roye/ Amy. Six (6) Officers and twenty-two (22) Enlisted Men of this unit are with Team "B", 53rd Service Group, at Strip A-60, Beaumont.

JOHN A. EVERHARD,
Captain, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1848 ###]

Auth: Serv Gp CO
Date: 30 Nov 44
Init:

HEADQUARTERS 1052ND SIGNAL COMPANY (SG)
53RD SERVICE GROUP

A-61-A, US Army 30 November 1944

SUBJECT: Unit History. TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, Strip A-61-A, US Army. (ATTN: Group Historian)

1. The following is the November installment of the Unit History of this organization. Changes were as follows:

a. Organization: Only change during the month was the return of S/Sgt Harold M. Bauer, 37115135 (237).

b. Strength: The return of Sgt Bauer brought the strength of Company Headquarters to 1 officer and 7 enlisted men; Detachment A remains at 1 officer and 46 enlisted men and Detachment B with 1 officer and 43 enlisted men. This brings the total strength to three officers and 96 enlisted men, one enlisted man short of the T/O strength of 97.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. In November, 32 months after activation, the 1052nd Signal Company celebrated its first year of overseas service, and the boys sewed on their sleeves their second overseas service "Hershey" bar. Also this month came news of proposed reorganization of service groups into service centers and the possibility this company might be deactivated.

3. This month the organization received General Orders Number 24 Headquarters, 1st Advanced Air Depot area, IX Air Force Service Command, dated 6 November 1944, which assigned Company Headquarters and both Detachments to the 30th Air Depot Group, located in Beauvais, for technical control. It was for the purpose of close coordination with the Depot that Service Group and Company Headquarters were moved to its present location. A copy of the above General Order is appended.

4. S/Sgt Bauer, who has long been the Section Chief of the Teletype Operations Section, was transferred from the organization in England for hospitalization, and this month those orders were cancelled. On the 22nd Sgt Bauer returned hale and hearty, all six feet, seven and a half inches of him, and was welcomed back after three months absence. Sgt Bauer has the distinction of being the only man in the Company to become married overseas. He received a seven day furlough and was married in London before reporting back to this organization.

5. Sgt Bauer's return and assignment to the Headquarters Section was the only change in organization, but there were a number of promotions during the month. T/3 Francis S. Brownell and T/3 Donnis E. Taylor, the Assistant Section Chief of Radio Repair for Detachment B and A respectively, were promoted to staff sergeant on Special Orders Number 109, Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 6 November 1944. On the same order Joseph C. Bleiler and Simon H. Snider, Section Chief of VHF Radio Repair for Detachment A and B respectively, were promoted to technician third grade. On Special Orders Number 167, Hq, 53rd Service Group, dated 1 November 1944, the following were promoted: T/4 George G. Lewis and T/4 Robert J. Martin, the Radar Repair Chief of Detachment A & B respectively, were promoted to technician third grade; promoted to technician fourth grade were the following Tech Fifths: Robert O. Kampert, William H. Pinkerous, Knowles R. Roberts, and Ben T. Ware, Jr., of Detachment B and Aaron K. Kraft, George ?. Parker, Jr., Will T. Shiflet, and Robert A. Phelps, of Detachment A; and Pfc Thomas H. Conn was promoted to T/5.

6. During the month Detachment 8 was still busy in winterizing their quarters, improving conditions of the area, and building up their shop. The Enlisted men's club for the detachment is nearing completion. The Detachment is still hampered by the fact that they have no commercial power as yet. The telephone line to the Depot, part of which is German cable, went out during the month, and it was discovered that some of the SP-4, spiral four cable, had been stolen. The Detachment was inspected by higher headquarters several times during the month - once on Thanksgiving Bay.

7. Detachment A spent the month doing its assigned job and making improvements on its quarters in what spare time there was. Enclosed are photographs which show the before and after appearance of the buildings occupied by the Detachment.

a. The Telephone installation and repair Section continued work on the lines to Beauvais. Considerable trouble was encountered and traced to broken insulators. This made necessary the climbing of each one of the 920 poles on the route in order that the insulators could be checked and replaced if found defective. Despite the handicaps, two talking circuits have been placed in service between the Detachment switchboard and the switchboard at the 30th Air Depot Group in Beauvais. Another trunk line has been installed to service the 1520th Truck Battalion at Montdidier.

b. The Radio Repair Section repaired and checked over one hundred and fifty sets of various types during the month besides the many civilian sets repaired during spare time. The Section also constructed a pubic address system for the Team Special Service. T/4 George Parker, together with Cpl John Noonan of Detachment B, was sent on temporary duty of three weeks to study GEE radar equipment at the 30th Air Depot. The photo lab of the section has bean doing an increasing amount of amateur film work. The lab is now recognized as one of the official ones for amateur work in the Service Team.

c. In the Operations Section the Radio and Message Center boys have beer handling the bulk of the work. An average of 500 code groups a day have been received by the operators and decoded by S/Sgt Perry and his Message Center boys. Considerable difficulty has seen encountered in receiving the NCS station in the evenings. This has made necessary three changes in frequency during the month.

d. The Headquarters and Warehouse Sections have been busy during the month with their usual administrative and supply functions. Both sections were subjected to several inspections by higher headquarters. Very satisfactory or excellent ratings were received from all inspectors.

e. The main social function of the month for the Detachment was the celebration held on Thanksgiving Day which was also the first anniversary of our arrival overseas. The kitchen staff under Sgt Montuori put out a real feast with all the turkey and extras that the boys could stuff down. The boys in the front barracks who are known as "One Big Happy Family" held their own private Banquet as did the Radio Maintenance men.

f. On the 27th a meeting was held to form an NCO club within the detachment. S/Sgt Taylor, Sgt Belanger, and Sgt Howard were elected President, secretary, and treasurer respectively. Committees were selected to draw up a set of rules and to plan and construct a club room.

g. Pam, the mascot, gave birth to a litter of five pups to add a flurry of excitement to the month. There are no existing vacancies in the T/O so the three brown and two white pups must be carried as overages at present. The paternity of the pups is still in doubt.

WILLIAM F. RIECK, JR.
Captain, Signal Corps
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1851 ###]

HEADQUARTERS. 1ST ADVANCED AIR DEPOT AREA IX AIR FORCE SERVICE COMMAND

APO 149, US Army 6 November 1944

GENERAL ORDERS )
NUMBER 24 )

SECTION I - ATTACHMENT OF UNITS
SECTION II - ASSIGNMENT OF SERVICE RESPONSIBILITY
SECTION III - ASSIGNMENT FOR TECHNICAL CONTROL

SECTION II

1. Team B, 53rd Service Group, is relieved from assigned to Service the 387th Bomb Group (M) and assigned to service the 386th Bomb Group (M), effective 0001 hours 16 October 1944.

SECTION III

1. The following service groups are relieved from assignment to the 2nd Tactical Air Depot for technical control only, effective 0001 hours 15 September 1944.

42nd Service Group
53rd Service Group
70th Service Group
304th Service Group

2. The following service groups and services teams are assigned to the 30th Air Depot Group for technical control only, effective 0001 hours 15 September 1944.

42nd Service Group
Hq, and Team A, 53rd Service Group
Team ?, 70th Service Group

3. The following service groups and service teams are assigned to the 91st Air Depot Group for technical control only, effective 0001 hours 15 September 1944.

304th Service Group
Hq, and Team A, 70th Service Group
Team B, 53rd Service Group

5. Team B, 53rd service Group, is relieved from assignment to the 91st Air Depot Group for technical control only and assigned to the 30th Air Depot Group for technical control only, effective 0001 hours 16 October 1944.

By order of Colonel VOSS:

R. A. ELLIOTT, JR. Colonel, AC Chief of Staff

OFFICIAL

ROBERT F. CHUPP,
Major, A.G.D.
Adjutant General.

DISTRIBUTION:


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1853 ###]

Auth: CO 53rd Serv Gp
Date: ??? 1944
Initials:

1769th ORDNANCE SUPPLY & MAINT CO AVN

COMPANY HISTORY NOVEMBER 1944

Organization: Negative.

Strength: 4 Officers, 69 Enlisted Men.

Movement: Negative.

Casualties: Negative.

Decorations: S/Sgt Lloyd L. Massey, Tec 3 John R. Smith, Sgts Warren F. Carrier, Charles D. Smith, Tec 4's Byrne D. Kelly, John F. Kenny, Elmer C. Neal, Lloyd E. Noland, Leo A. Overland, Maurice P. Roberge, Alan S. Tomb, Joseph Zidak, Tec 5's Joseph Cohen, Italo Sal Santo, Leornard G. Davis, Charles S. Locussistis, John J. Gouhin, Cruz Guerry, James P. Hall, Charles R. Lockard, John J. Mulholland, Leland E. Riley, Michael N. Schultz, Daniel A. Taylor, Edward J. Tolislero, Daniel M. McNamara, Pfc's Robert B. Melrose, Walter K. Osborne, John A. Van Derveer awarded Good Conduct Ribbons 5 November 1944.

PERSONNEL

16 - 2nd Lt. Neil R. Meredith, O359392, asgd jd from 1791st Ord S & M Co Avn. 26 - Pvt's Ford and ??? transferred to Hq & Hq Sq. 43rd Air Depot Group, Strip

RECREATION

The enlisted men's club of this organization ?? its ?? on Thanksgiving night. Almost every member of the organization ??? in the evening . T/Sgt ??? and Tec 4 Overland act as bartenders for the evening serving [illiegible]

RESUME

Automotive Section The motor maintenance Section of this unit continued on its normal stride this month turning out more work than usual because of the greater number of vehicles being serviced. Although many outfits not assigned to this strip for repairs are brought in vehicles to be repaired, some have been turned down. Being a hit shortage, the mechanics had to double their efforts in order to keep the work from piling up. The supply section is helping and a great deal is obtaining parts to repair these vehicles.

Ammunition Section

This section unloaded and stored ?? tons of bombs, 12,000 fuses, approximately ?? bombs were loaded with salvage to be ?? to the ?? The ?? [illegible]

Armament Section

This section over-hauled Cal. .50 machine guns which were to be returned to the Depot for salvage.

Supply Section

[illegible]

JAMES H. TSCHAPPT
Captain, Ord. Dept., Historical Officer


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1856 ###]

Auth: CG Ninth AF
Init:
Date: 5 Dec 1944

40TH MOBILE R & R SQUADRON (H) AAF STRIP A-61-A APO 149 US Army

5 December 1944

314.7

Unit History for November 1944,

1. Organization: Negative

2. Strength: a. Officer:9, Enlisted Men: 171

3. Movement: Negative.

4. Casualties: Negative.

5. Decorations: Negative.

November 1944 marks the first anniversary of the 40th Mobile R & R Squadron. The Squadron was activated on the 15th of November 1943, at Matching Essex, England.

Many changes have occurred since that bleak autumn of 1943 and many new things will have happened as time goes on. The beginning of the month shows twenty four Enlisted Men promoted, including five to Master Sergeant, one to Technical Sergeant, four to Staff Sergeant, eight to Sergeant and six to corporal.

Five enlisted men were transferred out, and two were added to the roll. 1st Lt Robert H. Countryman, Ass't Engineering Officer of Detachment "A" was transferred to the 53rd Air Service Squadron.

Three men, T/Sgt Lassiter, John W. Jr., & S/Sgts George R. Dirk, 4 James E. Thompson, were returned to the Zone of Interior, the United States, under the rotation plan. All have completed some twenty eight months of overseas duty.

A new Table of Organization and Equipment, 1-859s-(8), dtd 6 Apr 1944, was assigned the organization. Under this new table of Organization, Mos' were converted to conform with the new organization.

A personal survey was conducted in the Team. The purpose of the survey was to stimulate post war planning and vocational guidance for the men under the contemplated educational program. This is the first time a survey of this nature has been conducted by a Field in the ETO. Two enlisted men of Detachment "A", 40th Mobile R & R Sq (H), engineered the survey and have already been commended from higher headquarters for their efforts in this personal research field.

The fifteenth of November saw all the members of the Squadron together, if not in person then in spirit, to celebrate the first and we hope the last anniversary of the organization. A special meal was prepared and very elaborate decorations festooned the mess hall for the party. A very enjoyable evening was had by all. Programs were made and distributed to all the men.

Three off base jobs took the mobile units into action during the month. One job was completed near Aachen, Germany, thus enabling the outfit to get some first hand information concerning the front lines.

We almost had a Prisoner of War to our credit, or as the story goes, Lt Skidmore and an Enlisted Man were on night patrol at Detachment "B". The Lt was informed of some prowling German. Upon investigation they came upon a room with a smashed skylight and a pool of blood on the floor. After searching the neighborhood for several hours, nothing could be found.

ELRY L. FLEISHER,
1st Lt., A.C., Historical officer


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1858 ###]

AUTH: CO, 53rd Serv Gp.
DATE: 2 December 1944
INIT:

HEADQUARTERS 76TH AIR SERVICE SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP

SUBJECT: History of Organization. TO : Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 145, U. S. Army.

1. In compliance with letter, your headquarters, Subject: History of Organization, and Memo 20-10, Hq IX AFSC, par 4b and 4c, the following information is submitted;

a. Organization: (1) Changes in organization effected by new T/O's or other means: General Order 182, Hq IX AFSC, 7 November 194, i.e.- Redesignation 76th. Service Squadron as 76th. Air Service Squadron.

b. Strength of Organization: (1) Period covering from 1 November to 30 November 1944 Commissioned: 7 Officers 2 Warrant Officers 241 Enlisted Men

c. Movements: Negative

d. Casualties: Negative

e. Decorations; Negative

2. Contribution toward the war effort and part played by this unit:

Rough conditions after arrival in France give way to vigorous efficiency of 76th. personnel. Here are a few highlights of their many accomplishments in November.

Captain Eugene T. Trace, Engineering Officer, was promoted from the rank of First Lieutenant to that of Captain. Capt. Trace, who has compressed a brilliant, many-sided military career in a relatively short space of time, participated as a private in manuevers held in Wisconsin in 1940 by the Ohio National Guard, Company G.,45th. Infantry, together with a year of R.O.T.C. training at Ohio State University. Enlisting in the Army Air Forces, 23 March 1942 at Camp Perry, Ohio, he was called to active service on May 16, 1942 at Fort Hayes, Columbus, Ohio. Preflight followed at the Santa Ana Army Air Base, Santa Ana, California and then Primary light training at Thunderbird Field, Phoenix, Arizona, July to September, 1942. Next steps were Basic Flight training at the Marana Air Base, Marana, Ariz. and Advanced Flight training at Luke Field, Phoenix, Ariz., November to February,1942—43. He received rating of Pilot and was commissioned 2nd. Lt., in ORC,AAF., February 6, 1943; promoted to the rank of First Lieutenant, Feb. 5, 1944 and to the rank of Captain 1 November 1944.

Sergeant Carl Hansen designed and constructed a big brick oven outside the mess tent which, in addition to relieving the kitchen field ranges of a heavy baking load and thereby saving greatly on fuel and maintenance work, also enabled the squadron mess to serve, as often as practicable, pies, cakes, cookies, etc., a great factor in keeping up squadron morale and health.

Sergeant Hansen designed, helped construct and installed a water heating system for the GI cans used in mess gear washing which replaced the far more cumbersome water heaters commonly used. This resulted in saving two to four gallons of fuel per hour besides making washing far easier for the soldiers and eliminating much work for the

Careful study and action by the Commanding Officer and Adjutant led to a consolidation of guard posts and a roster adjustment which eased the guard duty burden from every other night to once every five or six nights per man. Organised coal and wood deliveries to each tent provided warming material for all personnel.

M/Sgt Clyde Hamilton assisted by S/Sgt. Ornell Schindler led a mobile unit into Belgium to put a battle damaged B26 back on flying status, a journey of hundreds of miles without communications with the base. The first night they slept, 12 in a pyramid tent designed to hold six. Here is a noteworthy comment on the speed of the Ninth Air Force teletype service. Upon completing the job, Sgt. Hamilton sent a teletype to his C.O., announcing that he was sending part of the unit back to base and would wait to service the plane for the flight crew. The unit reached the base a day ahead of the teletype.

T/Sgt. Edward Strecker assisted by S/Sgt. Roger Manwaring led another mobile unit into Belgium to repair a battle damaged B26. This unit lived entirely on C-rations for days and renewed their acquaintance with flying bombs which fell near their working place.

S/Sgt. Charles Erway assisted by S/Sgt. Henry Muller led another mobile unit beyond Paris to put a battle damaged B26 into the air. All these three mobile units finished their assignments many days ahead of schedule.

The Engineering Office keyed by capable officers and technical inspectors organised and maintained a repair schedule that paved the way for the arrival of five newest type B26s. Cancelling of passes and day and night work answered the demands of the 100-hour inspection in record time.

An armament department was created by borrowing armorers from mobile units to speed up T.O. modifications.

Parachute department production was maintained despite unavoidable lighting difficulties. This department also helped greatly in repairing valuable winter clothing which might otherwise have had to be salvaged. M/Sgt. Raymond Poland returned to his former post in this department and S/Sgt. James L. Rolenec became Acting First Sergeant.

Supply clicked on all fronts. Squadron supply organised dry cleaning and laundry; tech supply brought out the warm winter clothing which is such a boon to the men on the line. Quartermaster Supply brought in food as good as any in the U.K. Air Corps Supply, by storing up supplies and efficient paper work together with wise forethought have effected major repairs.

The Motor Pool sweated but schedules were steadily kept despite instances where men had to work up to 18 hours per day. The situation is now well organised, unnecessary and/or overlapping trips eliminated via the Shipping and Receiving Office, gas control very strict, working hours reasonable and equipment in unusually good condition.

T/Sgt. John Duke and his carpenters built benches and tables for an entire squadron mess. They also built cradles for airplanes and a giant stand for two big gas tanks.

Sergeants Goldwyn Kops and Harvey Silliman have been given charge of group bomb sight maintenance equipment.

Other accomplishments: Electric lights, cinder paths to cut down mud inconvenience, covered latrines, 18 hour Paris liberty runs and counter-VD measures outlined and enforced by the Medics.

The coming of Colonel Corbin as C.O. of this base on which this squadron operates has resulted in a noticeable tightening of discipline but those who have into active dealing with him have found him to be a man of eminent fairness.

To sum up: a happy month of hard work but leaving a taste of pleasurable accomplishment in the squadron mouth. The squadron hates war and wants to go home but these natural feelings are not interfering with their work.

PAUL L. SAFFELL
Major, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1860 ###]

Photo: PAUL L. SAFFELL, 76th Service Squadron.


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1861 ###]

AUTH: CG 9AF
DATE: 4 Jan 44
INIT:

87th Air Service Squadron

APO 149, U. S. Army, 4 December 1944.

SUBJECT: Squadron History (Installment XI, 30 November 1944).

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Squadron, APO 149, U. S. Army.

In compliance with Ltr, Hq, 53rd Serv Gp, Subject: Unit History, 23rd Jan 44, the following squadron history installment is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative

b. Strength: 8 Officers, 1 Warrant Officer, 236 Enlisted Men

c. Arrived AAF Station 173, Dunkeswell, near Honiton, Devon, 28 July 1944. Departed AAF Station 173 and arrived at AAF Sta 162, Chipping-Ongar, Essex, 13 Nov 43; departed AAF Sta 162, 27 Dec 1943 and arrived at AAF Sta 166, Matching Green, Essex 27 Dec 1943. Departed Matching Green, Essex, England and arrived at Airstrip A-73, Roye/Amy, France, 24,25, 26 September and 1, 2, 4, 7 October 1944.

d. Casualties: Negative

e. Decorations and Awards: Negative

2. The inclement weather continued throughout the month of November, and air operations were therefore very limited. However, the work of improving the living area was carried on without interruption. The biggest job was mud control. Toward this end, the following was accomplished; gravel hauled and put around the mess hall, barricades were constructed to keep vehicles from running off the roads into the mud, and walks were improved and added to. A new and improved method of heating water for the washing of mess kits was installed and proved to be very satisfactory. In addition, work was begun to enclose and roof this installation.

3. Some of the equipment that had been lost after being shipped via RTO was recovered. Many items were still missing, however; therefore, reports of survey were initiated on these items.

4. During the month of November, six (6) men were added to the squadron's roles. Five of these are new men and the other had returned from the hospital.

For the Commanding Officer:

WALTER B. NORTHRUP,
1st Lt., Air Corps,
Unit Historical Officer


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1862 ###]

Auth: CG 9th AF
Date: 4th Dec 1944
Init:

HEADQUARTERS
2198TH QUARTERMASTER TRUCK COMPANY AVN
53rd SERVICE GROUP
APO 149, US ARMY

4th December 1944

UNIT HISTORY for Month of November 1944.

1. Organization: Negative.

2. Strength: [illegible]

3. Movement: Headquarters: Negative. Det "A": Negative.

4. Casualties: Negative.

5. Decorations: Negative.

6. During the month of November, Headquarters, 2198th QM Trk Co., Avn, remained at AAF Sta A-73 on the continent and performed duties of a Quartermaster Truck Company attached to a Service Team of a Service Group. On Thanksgiving night a Sta Thanksgiving Party was had and enjoyed by the O & EM of this HQ and the Team Commander & Adjutant. The vehicles hauled bombs, rations, aircraft parts, personnel, gasoline & oil, and performed miscellaneous transportation duties at an AAF Station.

Det "A" 2198th QM Trk Co., Avn, consisting of 66 EM, 3 Officers remained at AAF Sta A-60. They are charged in transporting gasoline & oil, minitions, rations, aircraft parts, personnel and filling miscellaneous transportation requirments for a Service Team of a Service Group. The Detachment gained one Officer, 1st Lieut SAMUEL J. BURCK, Automotive Officer.

PAUL S. GLICK
Capt., QMC
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1863 ###]

Auth: CO, Sta 166
Date: 30 Nov 1944
INITIALS:

COMPANY HISTORY of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintensnce co (Avn)

November 1 to 30, 1944

ORGANIZATION - Negative

STRENGTH - As of 50 November 1944, the strength of this organization was 3 Officers, 77 Enlisted Men assigned and 1 Enlisted Man attached.

MOVEMENT - Negative CASUALTIES - Negative DECORATIONS - Negative

During the momth ef November, 1944, the 1589th Ordmamce S4M Co (Avn) carried on its regular operstional duties, supply and maintenance of Team "A", 53rd Service Group, and of the 391st Bomb Greup and all organizations attached to it.

1st Lt. Fred J. Werran, our Ammunition Officer, was lost to the organization as a result of his hospitalization for a wound suffered in the Bomb Dump.

Passes opened up this morth, Liberty Runs to St. Quentin deing supplanted early in the month by Liberty Runs to Paris.

Our Compauy Day Room also opened this month and has become the social center of the organization. It, together with the new pass privileges, has greatly aided in sustaining the high level of morale within this organization.

Mail service has been very spotty during the month of Nevrember, but it is confidently expected that the Christmas rush of letters and parcels will be rolling in soon. The kindly gesture of Mrs Wm. J. Turner, 537 E. 27th Street, Patterson, New Jersey, who sent a Christmas percel for a "U. S. Soldier Who Did not Get A Christmas Box", is worthy of this official expression of gratitude.

C. M. REMER
Captain, Ord Dept
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1866 ###]

Auth: CO, 53rd S. G.
Date: 5 Dec 1944
Initials:

1176TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY, SERVICE GROUP
APO 149, US Army.

SUBJECT: Unit History.

TO: Group Historian, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. The following is a subsequent installment of the Unit History of this organization for the month of November 1944.

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: (As of 30 Nov 44) Two (2) Officers, Thirty-eight (38) EM

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. Unit Narrative:

Availability of most items of Quartermaster Supply has increased during the month of November.

Class I requirements, with few exceptions, have been met by the supplying Base Depots. Sufficient quantities of meat, lard, sugar and coffee cannot be had at certain in times, however.

More items of Class II & IV Supplies have become available during November.

Less difficulty has been experienced in maintaining sufficient stock level of gasoline, although grease and oil continue to be scarce, and hauling of these items from the beach is still necessary. This unit has supervised strict rationing of MT fuel, and consumption has been reduced to a minimum.

DANIEL W. MAHONEY,
1st Lieut., QMC,
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1867/8 ###]

Photograph annotated "1052nd Signal Company - Front view of main building after repair. Strip A-73 ??"


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1869/70 ###]

Photograph annotated "1052nd Signal Company - Front view of main building after repair. Strip A-73 ??"


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1871/72 ###]

Photograph annotated "1052nd Signal Company - Communications building after repair. Strip A-73 Roye/Amy."


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1873/4 ###]

Photograph annotated "1052nd Signal Company - Communications building after repair. Strip A-73 Roye/Amy."


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1875/6 ###]

Photograph annotated "1052nd Signal Company - Main building before repair. Strip A-73 Roye/Amy."


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1877/8 ###]

Photograph annotated "1052nd Signal Company - Rear view of main building after repair. Strip A-73 Roye/Amy."


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1879/80 ###]

Photograph annotated "1052nd Signal Company - Rear view of main building before repair. Strip A-73 Roye/Amy."


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1883 ###]

AUTH: CO 53RD SV GP
DATE: 6 JAN 45
INITIALS:

HEADQUARTERS
53RD SERVICE GROUP

APO 149, US Army 6 January 1945.

In reply refer to: 300.6

SUBJECT: Installments of Unit Histories. TO: Commanding General, IX Air Force Service Command, APO 149, US Army. ATTENTION: Historical Branch, Intelligence Section. (THRU CHANNELS).

Transmitted herewith in compliance with paragraph 5, Memo 20-10, Hq, IX Air Force Service Command, 25 October 1944, are installments of Unit Histories for organizations of this Group for your information.

For the Commanding Officer:

FRANK E. ROBINS, JR.,
Major, Air Corps,
Adjutant.

9 Incls: Unit Histories


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1884 ###]

AUTH: CO 53rd Serv Gp
DATE: 6 January 1945
INITIALS:

HEADQUARTERS AND HEADQUARTERS SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP
APO 149 US ARMY

31 December 1944

SUBJECT: Monthly Installment of Unit History

TO: Group Historical Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. In compliance with memorandum, Hqs, IX Air Force Service Command, No. 20-10, dated ? October 1944, the following information is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: 23 Officers and 133 Enlisted Men.

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. A short narrative of the part ???

a. [illegible]

b. [illegible]

c. [illegible]

d. [illegible]

e. [illegible]

2. a. [illegible]

b. [illegible]

c. [illegible]

d. [illegible]

e. What first appeared to be a probing of positions on the Western Front by German mechanized units suddenly developed into a full scale counter attack by Von Runstedt with massed tanks, artillery, infantry, para-troops and strong support from from a resurgent Luftwaffe. With a ?? which ?? the seriousness of the situation on December 24th, Capt Everhard announced the restriction of all personnel to the post, the ?? of guard stations in the rear areas and the doubling of all guard patrols from 1800 hours thru 0600 hours with each patrol reporting every twenty minutes by telephone to the Sergeant of the Guard. Off post trip tickets were issued only upon the approval of Group Headquarters and personnel were instructed to carry full equioment including Gas Mask and Helmet. The emergency was ??? by the receipt

[following pages are mostly illegible


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1888 ###]

[this and following pages are illegible, looks like 1052nd Signal Company (SG)


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1895 ###]

1052nd Signal Company (SG) [this and following pages are mostly illegible and look like an inventory of vehicles and equipment


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1911 ###]

AUTH: CO, 53rd Serv Gp.
DATE: 2 January 1945
INIT:

HEADQUARTERS 76TH AIR SERVICE SQUADRON
53RD SERVICE GROUP

SUBJECT: History of Organization. TO : Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Group, APO 145, U. S. Army.

1. In compliance with letter, your headquarters, Subject: History of Organization, and Memo 20-10, Hq IX AFSC, par 4b and 4c, the following information is submitted;

a. Organization: (1) Changes in organization effected by new T/O's or other means: Negative.

b. Strength of Organization: (1) Period covering from 1 December to 31 December 1944 Commissioned: 7 Officers 2 Warrant Officers 233 Enlisted Men

c. Movements: Negative

d. Casualties: Negative

e. Decorations; Negative

2. Contribution toward the war effort and part played by this unit:

December was another deceptive month fer the 76th. On the surface, a quiet month, in reality a great deal was accomplished.

Capt. Trace's engineering, dept. continued to pour out work. Several battle damaged ships were repaired and returned to duty. New ships were given acceptance tests and prepared fer action.

Unofficial recapitulation showed the 76th. has repaired, worked on and returned to combat mere than 225 planes since coming overseas or the equivalent of 15 Air squadrons.

The parachute shop has packed easily far more than 1000 parachutes.

Lt. Kramer's motor pool, assisted by mobile unit mechanics, and superb work on two occasions, pulling cracked up planes off the mud adjoining a main runway. Their skill was strikingly demonstrated on a particularly dangerous job where safety considerations required a plane to to pulled out of the mud without a man at the towbar. The risky work was done without damage to personnel, plane er equipment.

Capt. Gordon's medics continued their vigorous fight ageist V.D. with sex lectures, movies, posters, prophylaxis and contraceptives, and proudly announced a month passed without a single V.D. casualty.

CWO Leach's electricians and CWO Smith's Air Corps Supply men, who, incidentally, under the aegis of Capt. Pinebird have handled at least $10,000,000 worth of aircraft equipment since coming overseas, cooperated to complete efficient electrification for the squadron. Huge poles were set up and the French power system tapped. Many of the men used on this job had never had previous experience on this type of work.

Lt. Nuttall's orderly room, spearheaded by Sergeant Relenec, acting First Sergeant, supervised an educational survey which resulted in many men being enabled to enjoy the privilege of sending for special correspondence courses on subjects they desired to study.

The orderly room also started am Enlisted Men's Club. The squadron elected a Committee of Five and the committee elected T/Sgt. John Duke, chairman. The committee

sent a member to Rheims and Cambrai with Lt. McElroy to buy champagne and beer. The recent Christmas party imparted a wallop to the celebration of the holiday that would have been otherwise sadly lacking.

The committee, nevertheless, had found the Champagne situation such that buying was almost impossible. The champagne factories absolutely refused to sell to American or British soldiers. Due entirely to Lt. McElroy's determination and persuasiveness, his ability to buy six bottles here and a dozen bottles there, together with long hours spent in traveling, the EM were finally enables to obtain a good supply of drinking material. Without him, Christmas would have been dry indeed for this squadron. And, so long had they been gone, that, en their return, they were greeted with surprise and joy. The squadron had heard and believed the rumor that the beer truck and its personnel had been commandeered to haul ammunition to the front.

Bomb group respect for service group intelligence was slightly enhanced when a 75th. man teamed with M.R. & R. man to slaughter a bomb group team in an Information Please Contest at the camp ARC. Score: 80 to 27. The prize was a bottle of champagne and the camp championship.

The promise of a new war role for the 76th. was foreshadowed with the arrival of an A26 mobile School. The mechanics and specialists who attended the school were pleasantly surprised at the high quality of useful instruction provided.

Bombsight Maintenance Men, Sgts. Harvey Silliman and Gerry Keps broadened their activities to include acceptance tests on all AFCE equipment handled by the squadron.

Major Saffell acted reluctantly but firmly to prevent whet threatened to because a wave of carelessness in the squadron's use of pass privileges. Several sergeants were reduced to privates for abusing Paris pass privileges and the carelessness stopped promptly.

Lt. Love'e Mess Hall delighted the squadron by hiring French boys as mess attendants, cutting KP to a minimum. Sgt. Mansen further improved his water heating device which not only eliminates the cumbersome Army water heaters but saves more then fifty percent in gasoline consumption.

Lt. McElroy's Special Services brought in three USO shows for the fellows, a such appreciated accomplishment.

PAUL L. SAFFELL,
Major, Air Corps,
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1913 ###]

[this and following pages are illegible


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1916 ###]

Auth: CG 9th AF
Date: 5th Jan 1945
Init:

HEADQUARTERS
2198TH QUARTERMASTER TRUCK COMPANY AVIATION
53rd SERVICE GROUP
APO 149, US ARMY

5th January 1944

UNIT HISTORY for Month of December 1944.

1. Organization: Negative.

2. Strength: 4 Officers, 99 Enlisted Men, 2 EM asgd and jd.

3. Movement: Headquarters: Negative. Det "A": Negative.

4. Casualties: Negative.

5. Decorations: Negative.

During month of December 1944, Headquarters, 2198th QM Trk Co., Avn, remained at AAF Sta A-73 on the continent and performed duties of a Quartermaster Truck Company attached to a Service Team of a Service Group. The CO of the organization was promoted to Captain. The men and vehicles hauled bombs, rations, aircraft parts, gasoline & oil, personnel and performed other miscellaneous transportation requirements of an AAF Station.

Det "A", 2198th QM Trk Co., Avn, consisting of 47 EM and 2 Officers remained at AAF Sta A-60. The men and vehicles are engaged in transporting gasoline and oil, munitions, rations, aircraft parts, personnel and other miscellaneous transportation requirements for a Service Team of a Service Group.

PAUL S. GLICK
Capt., QMC
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1917 ###]

Auth: CG Ninth AF
Init:
Date: 5 January 1945

40TH MOBILE R & R SQUADRON (H) AAF STRIP A-61-A APO 149 US Army

5 December 1944

314.7

Unit History for December 1944,

1. Organization: Negative

2. Strength: a. Officer:7, Enlisted Men: 170.

3. Movement: Negative.

4. Casualties: Negative.

5. Decorations: 1 Soldier's Medal.

This December month turned out to be one of excitement as well as surprise for many of the personnel being promoted. Included in the promotions were 14 corporals promoted to sergeant, 10 private first class's were promoted to corporal and 10 privates promoted to private first class. Up to date all but approximately 1 of the men have been promoted.

The squadron Commander, Captain John E. Cogle war promoted to the grade of Major.

In compliance with directives from higher headquarters the sixth war loan drive was given wide publicity and 20% of the men participated in the purchase of bonds. Approximately 54% of the men have formed the habit of putting their money into Soldier's Deposit.

As a result of the enemy counter offensive, defense plans, fire prevention, and evacuation of station have been drawn up and rehearsed. Guards were doubled and posted in important areas.

During the month some 15 men have been returned to England to attend various training schools including, prop, plexiglass, and double engine schools, for 7 to 20 day courses. At this time the majority of the men are performing dual function and filling in on numerous tasks they were not capable of doing beforehand.

The squadron has been redesignated from the 40th Mobile R & R Sq, to the 40th Mobile R & R SQ.(Heavy), per GO 192, IX AFSC, dtd 22 November 1944, effective 1 December 1944.

Technical Sergeant Fred Fisher was awarded the Soldier's Medal for heroism on the 24th of August 1944 at Friston England. Sgt Fisher, at the risk of his life forced his way into the radio compartment of a B-26 to rescue an officer lying unconscious in the blazing airplane, the result of a crash.

Two EM were transferred out of the organization , and one was added.

In spite of the restriction and extra security measures taken, Christmas Day was enjoyed in high spirit, with a large number of men attending services, and the usual holiday dinner.

The mail situation improved considerably as packages have arrived regularly and plentiful. As many as fourteen bags have been received in one day. The letters which were also presumed lost and even forgotten came through in time to make Christmas less lonelier, because of the thoughtfulness of loved ones remembering their cherished ones at the loneliest time of year.

JOHN E COGLE
Major, AC
Commanding


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1919 ###]

AUTH: CG 9 AF
DATE: 4 Jan 45
INIT:

87th Air Service Squadron

APO 149, U. S. Army, 5 January 1945.

SUBJECT: Squadron History (Installment XII, 31 December 1944).

TO: Commanding Officer, 53rd Service Squadron, APO 149, U. S. Army.

In compliance with Ltr, Hq, 53rd Serv Gp, Subject: Unit History, 23rd Jan 44, the following squadron history installment is submitted:

a. Organization: Negative

b. Strength: 8 Officers assigned, 1 Warrant Officer assigned, 5 Officers attached, 241 Enlisted Men assigned, 23 Enlisted Men attached.

c. Arrived AAF Station 173, Dunkeswell, near Honiton, Devon, 28 July 1944. Departed AAF Station 173 and arrived at AAF Sta 162, Chipping-Ongar, Essex, 13 Nov 43; departed AAF Sta 162, 27 Dec 1943 and arrived at AAF Sta 166, Matching Green, Essex 27 Dec 1943. Departed Matching Green, Essex, England and arrived at Airstrip A-73, Roye/Amy, France, 24,25, 26 September and 1, 2, 4, 7 October 1944.

d. Casualties: Negative

e. Decorations and Awards: Negative

2. Inclement weather kept the planes on the ground most of month. There were the usual inspections and minor repairs keeping the line personnel occupied. The first few days of the main German offensive in the Ardennes sector were foggy ones but after the weather broke favorably the Bomb Group sent up its planes. On the first mission there were many planes that failed to return and many more that suffered battle damage. During those few days great effort was put forth by line personnel to make the damaged ships operational. During the month of December, work was performed on twenty (20) planes, most of the repair work battle damage. Fuel cells were replaced and one engine was changed due to battle damage.

3. The special service personnel attached to this organization has done commendable work. Starting with practically nothing but a partly demolished German barracks, they used great ingenuity in improvising a first class theatre out of the material at hand. Walls and ceilings were pieced in. A stage was erected together with a small adjoining room for quarters of the enlisted special service personnel. The finished product displays red stage curtains rigged so they fold together by curtain ropes, footlights, and imitation light paneling with a modern touch. Seats are regular chairs providing comfort to movie goers. A piano is present and is often played for twenty minutes before the show begins.

Lt PAUL WEXLER, Sgt Albert Ulsch, Cpl William DeLacy, Cpl Robert E. Smith are responsible for turning what ordinarily would be just a movie into a place that the Officers and Enlisted Men of the Tactical Organization prefer in place of their own theatre.

4. Christmas, 1944, was celebrated by assigned and attached personnel of this organization by a squadron party. Handicapped by a shortage of champagne, enough beer and cider was present to supplement the drink situation. Nevertheless, enough champagne was available to provide one bottle for each three men. A good, robust time was had by all as Officers and Enlisted Men joined in song and fun.

For the Commanding Officer:

WALTER B. NORTHRUP,
1st Lt., Air Corps,
Unit Historical Officer


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1921 ###]

Auth: CO, 53rd S. G.
Date: 5 Jan 1945
Initials:

1176TH QUARTERMASTER COMPANY, SERVICE GROUP (AVN)
APO 149, US Army.

SUBJECT: Unit History.

TO: Group Historian, 53rd Service Group, APO 149, US Army.

1. The following is a subsequent installment of the Unit History of this organization for the month of November 1944.

a. Organization: Negative.

b. Strength: (As of 31 Dec 44) Two (2) Officers, Thirty-eight (38) EM

c. Movement: Negative.

d. Casualties: Negative.

e. Decorations: Negative.

2. Unit Narrative:

Most items of Quartermaster Supply have been available during the past month. Some items of Class II Supply have been frozen during the past month, but this condition is not expected to exist for any great length of time.

Not much difficulty has been experienced in maintaining sufficient stock level of gasoline, although grease and oil continue to be scarce. It has been required of the various motor pools located on the station to not change oil in their vehicles only when absolutely necessary.

DANIEL W. MAHONEY,
1st Lieut., QMC,
Unit Historian


[### Reel B0818 - Page 1922 ###]

Auth: CO, Sta A-73
Date: 31 Dec 1944
INITIALS:

COMPANY HISTORY of the 1589th Ordnance Supply & Maintenance Co (Avn)

December 1 to 31, 1944

Organization - Negative.

STRENGTH - As of 31 December 1944, the strength of this organization was 3 Officers, 73 Enlisted Men assigned, and 1 Enlisted Man attached.

Movement - Negative.

Casualties - Negative.

Decorations - Negative

The potential threat of Von Runstedt's drive and its attendant increase in aerial activity by the German Luftwaffe was reflected in the increased activity on this base during the past month.

All personnel of this organization were made available for a 24-hour-a-day , 7-day-a-week working schedule. Station security measures were put into full effect. The outlying fringe of AAF Station A-73 occupied by our organization was patrolled by roving guards throughout the night. The guard at our Bomb Stores Area was quadrupled and the number of guards furnished for plane guard was tripled. Individual weapons, ammunition and gas masks were carried at all times. Detailed plans were draws up for Emergency Evacuation and for Demolition. The Demolition Squad to remain behind after the departure of the main body of the troops was composed of volunteers from this organization and was headed by Captain O. M. Remer, and T/Sgt John W. Birnbaum.

In view of the increased German aerial activity the blackout was rigidly enforced. Full preparations were made for any contingency that might possibly arise.

In addition to, and far more important then these emergency defensive measures, the Bomb Group was taking every possible opportunity to do their part in smearing the German offensive. The Ammunition Section of this company willingly worked day and night to do their part in ensuring a steady flow of explosives to the German Reich.

The fine work of T/Sgt John W. Birnbaum, Ammunition NCO of this organization, during the period of emergency is worthy of commendation. Sgt Birnbaum has been in charge of the Bomb Storage Area since the hospitalization of our Ammunition Officer on 12 October 1944, 'The willingness and cheerfulness the personnel of the Ammunition Section display in spite of difficult working con-

ditions and the long and irregular hours of work is a tribute to the leadership qualities of Sgt Birnbaum. His industry, technical knowledge and leadership has enabled the Ammunition Section to maintain their high level of efficiency despite the lack of supervision by a commissioned officer.

During the month of December, 1944, the remaining sections of the organization performed their regular operational duties.

Lt. Irving Brody, Armament, Supply & Property Officer of this organization was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on 15 December 1944.

The MOTOR VEHICLE DRIVER AND MECHANIC AWARD was awarded to twelve members of the Automotive Maintenance Section of this organization during the month of December, 1944.

Three men were sent to Technical Schools within the past month, Techn 5th Gr Ralph W. Harris attended a short course in Enemy Mines and Booby Traps in connection with the recently initiated Disarmament Program. Technicians 5th Grade Louis P. Daneck and George E. Wunderley are attending a course on Welding in London, England.

Every effort was made to push War Bond Sale within this unit during the past month so as to see a suitable contribution to the Sixth War Loan. All personnel cooperated splendidly with the result that over 20% of the money received on the pay roll was diverted to the purchase of War Bonds.

The mails come through rather well, most Christmas packages having arrived before Christmas. Christmas in 1944, though not a day of gaiety, was a day of hope and rededication. As the year ended the men turned in, readying themselves for the next day's work. Another day's work, another day nearer home.

O. M. REMER
Captain, Ord Dept
Unit Historian.


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "On the LCT."
Pfc J. Drinnen
T/Sgt Phillips
[illegible]
Pfc Johnson

Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Vehicles on LCT."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Boarding the LCT."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Boarding a B-26 Marauder."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "C-47 Transports."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Base Defense ?"


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "On the truck ?"


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Southampton, waiting to embark ?"


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Disembarking the LCT on Utah beach, Normandy ?"


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "LCT ?."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Buying war bonds ?."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Children's Christmas Party ?."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Children's Christmas Party ?."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Children's Christmas Party ?."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Enroute to Roye/Amy ?."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Aboard the LCT ?."


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Photo: 1052 Sig Co: "Pfc Lemoine C. Shaw 16024418 and canine friend ?."